Skip header and navigation

Refine By

50 records – page 1 of 5.

Access to care and satisfaction in colorectal cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172325
Source
World J Surg. 2005 Nov;29(11):1444-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Geoffrey A Porter
Karen M Inglis
Lori A Wood
Paul J Veugelers
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Dalhousie University, 7-007 Victoria Building, QEII Health Sciences Center, 1278 Tower Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 2Y9, Canada. Geoff.Porter@dal.ca
Source
World J Surg. 2005 Nov;29(11):1444-51
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - surgery
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Nova Scotia
Patient satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Waiting Lists
Abstract
This study described the various components of access to care for resectable colorectal cancer, and correlated the timeliness of these components with patient satisfaction. With a prospective/retrospective cohort design, all patients undergoing surgical resection for primary colorectal cancer from 2/1/01 to 15/12/01, were identified during their admission for surgery. A comprehensive, standardized method of ascertaining specific time intervals, which included a patient interview, was used. A patient satisfaction questionnaire was developed, tested, and used in consenting patients. Over the study period, 118 patients underwent colorectal cancer resection. Of these, 110 (93%) consented to participate and 101 (86%) completed the satisfaction questionnaire, including test-retest. The median time intervals (interquartile range) for the various components of access to care were as follows: symptoms to first physician visit, 32 days (10-75); first physician visit to diagnosis, 88 days (44-218); diagnosis to surgery, 19 days (10-44); surgery to chemotherapy (where applicable), 54 days (47-72). On multivariate analysis, tumor location in the rectum was associated with longer prediagnosis intervals, whereas increasing tumor stage was associated with shorter intervals from diagnosis to surgery. Variation in the time interval from diagnosis to surgery was associated with patient satisfaction (r = 0.49; P
PubMed ID
16240060 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between caesarean section and childhood obesity revisited: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113830
Source
Arch Dis Child. 2013 Jul;98(7):526-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Kelli Flemming
Christy G Woolcott
Alexander C Allen
Paul J Veugelers
Stefan Kuhle
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit, Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Arch Dis Child. 2013 Jul;98(7):526-32
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Weight
Canada
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Nova Scotia
Obesity - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Abstract
The mode of delivery has recently gained attention as another potential perinatal risk factor for childhood obesity but results are conflicting.
To examine whether caesarean section is independently associated with childhood obesity after adjusting for a broad range of confounding factors.
The current study used a population-based survey in Grade 5 students linked to a provincial perinatal registry in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. Associations between caesarean section and childhood overweight and obesity at age 10/11 years were examined using multiple logistic regression.
Of the 4298 students who participated in the 2003 Children's Lifestyle and School Performance Study (response rate 51.1%), 3426 (80%) could be linked with information in the Atlee Perinatal Database, and 2988 mother-child pairs (70%) had complete information on the exposure and outcome. Compared to vaginal delivery, caesarean section was associated with offspring obesity (OR) 1.49, 95% CI 1.10 to 2.00) in the univariate analysis. After adding maternal prepregnancy weight to the multiple regression model, the OR for obesity dropped from 1.48 to 1.20 (95% CI 0.87 to 1.65). When caesarean section with and without labour were considered separately, we found no statistically significant associations relative to the vaginal delivery group (OR 1.24, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.82 and OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.84).
Our results do not support a causal association between caesarean section and childhood obesity. Maternal prepregnancy weight was an important confounder in the association between caesarean delivery and childhood obesity and needs to be considered in future studies.
PubMed ID
23680850 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular risk-factor profiles of normal and overweight children and adolescents: insights from the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119338
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Aug;29(8):976-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Katerina Maximova
Stefan Kuhle
Zachary Davidson
Christina Fung
Paul J Veugelers
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. katerina.maximova@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Aug;29(8):976-82
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Body Weight
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology
Child
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Obesity - blood - epidemiology
Overweight - blood - epidemiology
Prevalence
Primary Prevention
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
There is no cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profile in a representative sample of Canadian children and adolescents according to weight status. The 2007-2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey, launched by Statistics Canada in partnership with Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada, provides an opportunity to address this gap.
The Canadian Health Measures Survey collected information at 15 sites across Canada from March 2007 to March 2009 from Canadians aged 6 to 79 years living in private households. The survey consisted of a household interview and a visit to a mobile examination centre to perform physical measurements, including anthropometry, blood pressure, and biospecimen collection. The present analysis is based on data from 2087 children and adolescents aged 6 to 19 years.
Children and adolescents who were overweight or obese had on average higher mean concentrations and higher prevalence of adverse levels of CVD risk factors (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein B, C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and insulin levels) than did normal-weight children and adolescents. Adjustment for covariates (gender, age, household education, household income adequacy, and province of residence) and compliance with recommendations for daily steps, soft-drink intake, and sleep duration did not alter the differences in CVD risk factors between normal weight and overweight or obese children and adolescents.
Results of this study underscore the importance of excess weight as an independent risk factor for CVD health in early life and call for primary prevention of overweight and obesity in childhood to reduce CVD risk.
PubMed ID
23111384 View in PubMed
Less detail

Children's preference for large portions: prevalence, determinants, and consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162714
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Jul;107(7):1183-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Cynthia K Colapinto
Angela Fitzgerald
L Janette Taper
Paul J Veugelers
Author Affiliation
Health Promotion Division, Sudbury & District Health Unit, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Jul;107(7):1183-90
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Child
Child Nutrition Sciences - education
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Diet - standards
Eating - physiology - psychology
Energy intake
Feeding Behavior - physiology - psychology
Female
Food - classification
Food Preferences
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Mass Media
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Overweight
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Schools
Size Perception
Vegetables
Abstract
Proliferation of large portions of snack and fast foods parallels dramatic increases in childhood obesity. This study investigates the prevalence, determinants, and consequences of large portions in children's diets.
As part of the 2003 Children's Lifestyle and School-performance Study, we surveyed 4,966 children in Nova Scotia regarding their usual portion sizes of french fries, meats, vegetables, and potato chips using three-dimensional graduated food models. We measured heights and weights and assessed dietary intake with the Harvard Youth Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire. Diet quality was summarized using the Diet Quality Index International (DQI-I). Parents were surveyed on food habits and socioeconomic background.
We used multilevel regression methods to examine determinants of children's large portion size choice and to evaluate the effect of this selection on energy intake, diet quality, and overweight.
Children reported preference for portions of french fries, meats, and potato chips that are larger and vegetable portions that are smaller than what is recommended. Children from socioeconomically disadvantaged families or who frequently eat while watching television and in fast-food restaurants preferred larger portions of french fries and potato chips. Consequences of consuming large portions of these foods included poor diet quality and increased energy intake. Consuming large portions of vegetables was associated with lower energy intake and better diet quality.
Successful marketing of large portions of french fries and potato chips may be at the expense of diet quality and appropriate energy intake. Policy regulations and nutrition education emphasizing appropriate portion sizes provide opportunities to prevent overweight and improve future health.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Jul;107(7):1107-1017604739
PubMed ID
17604749 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of ICD code-based diagnosis of obesity with measured obesity in children and the implications for health care cost estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128579
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011;11:173
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Stefan Kuhle
Sara F L Kirk
Arto Ohinmaa
Paul J Veugelers
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, 650 University Terrace, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2T4, Canada.
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011;11:173
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Electronic Health Records - standards
Female
Health Care Costs
Humans
International Classification of Diseases - standards
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Obesity - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Administrative health databases are a valuable research tool to assess health care utilization at the population level. However, their use in obesity research limited due to the lack of data on body weight. A potential workaround is to use the ICD code of obesity to identify obese individuals. The objective of the current study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of an ICD code-based diagnosis of obesity from administrative health data relative to the gold standard measured BMI.
Linkage of a population-based survey with anthropometric measures in elementary school children in 2003 with longitudinal administrative health data (physician visits and hospital discharges 1992-2006) from the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. Measured obesity was defined based on the CDC cut-offs applied to the measured BMI. An ICD code-based diagnosis obesity was defined as one or more ICD-9 (278) or ICD-10 code (E66-E68) of obesity from a physician visit or a hospital stay. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and health care cost estimates based on measured obesity and ICD-based obesity were compared.
The sensitivity of an ICD code-based obesity diagnosis was 7.4% using ICD codes between 2002 and 2004. Those correctly identified had a higher BMI and had higher health care utilization and costs.
An ICD diagnosis of obesity in Canadian administrative health data grossly underestimates the true prevalence of childhood obesity and overestimates the health care cost differential between obese and non-obese children.
Notes
Cites: Adv Data. 2000 Jun 8;(314):1-2711183293
Cites: Pediatrics. 2002 May;109(5):E81-111986487
Cites: Obes Rev. 2005 May;6(2):123-3215836463
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Sep 13;173(6):607-1316157724
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Jan;161(1):11-417199061
Cites: Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Apr;6(2):142-820874077
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jul;15(7):1895-90117636109
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2008 Jan;5(1):A0418081993
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:8818426608
Cites: J Hosp Med. 2009 Mar;4(3):149-5619301381
Cites: J Pediatr. 2009 Mar;154(3):327-3118950792
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Mar;161(3):222-717339502
PubMed ID
22189019 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comprehensive school health in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138849
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jul-Aug;101 Suppl 2:S5-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Paul J Veugelers
Margaret E Schwartz
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB. paul.veugelers@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jul-Aug;101 Suppl 2:S5-8
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Diet
Health Policy
Health Promotion - methods - standards
Humans
Motor Activity
Obesity - prevention & control
School Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
The Canadian education system is among the best in the world academically. In contrast, students' (children and youth) eating and activity levels are so poor that they have led to prevalence rates of overweight that are among the highest in the world. Given the enormous public health burden associated with poor nutrition and physical inactivity, Canada needs to address this health risk. Comprehensive school health (CSH) is a promising approach to promoting healthy eating and active living (HEAL). This article provides a review of CSH and discusses its four essential elements: 1) teaching and learning; 2) social and physical environments; 3) healthy school policy; and 4) partnerships and services. It also provides a common understanding of the implementation and broader benefits of CSH, which, in addition to health, include student learning and self-esteem. The article further discusses some complexities of a rigorous evaluation of CSH, which comprises proof of implementation, impact and positive outcome. Though such an evaluation has yet to be conducted, some studies did confirm successful implementation, and another study observed positive outcomes. Rigorous evaluation is urgently needed to provide a stronger evidence base of the benefits of CSH for learning, self-esteem and disease prevention. This evidence is essential to justify devoting more school time to promote HEAL and more resources to implement and support CSH to the benefit of both learning and health.
PubMed ID
21133195 View in PubMed
Less detail

Costs of implementing and maintaining comprehensive school health: the case of the Annapolis Valley Health Promoting Schools program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128872
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Nov-Dec;102(6):451-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Arto Ohinmaa
Jessie-Lee Langille
Stuart Jamieson
Caroline Whitby
Paul J Veugelers
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB. arto.ohinmaa@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Nov-Dec;102(6):451-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Financing, Organized - economics - organization & administration
Health Promotion - economics - organization & administration
Humans
Nova Scotia
Nutritional Sciences - education
Overweight - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Physical Education and Training - economics - organization & administration
Program Development - economics
Public-Private Sector Partnerships
School Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Volunteers
Abstract
Comprehensive school health (CSH) is increasingly receiving renewed interest as a strategy to improve health and learning. The present study estimates the costs associated with implementing and maintaining CSH.
We reviewed the accounting information of all schools in the Annapolis Valley Health Promoting Schools (AVHPS) program in 2008/2009. We considered support for nutrition and physical activity programs by the public system, grants, donations, fundraising and volunteers.
The annual public funding to AVHPS to implement and maintain CSH totaled $344,514, which translates, on average, to $7,830 per school and $22.67 per student. Of the public funding, $140,500 was for CSH, $86,250 for breakfast programs, $28,750 for school food policy programs, and the remainder for other subsidized programs. Grants, donations and fundraising were mostly locally acquired. They totaled $127,235, which translates, on average, to $2,892 per school or $8.37 per student. The value of volunteer support was estimated to be equivalent to the value of grants, donations and fundraising combined. Of all grants, donations, fundraising and volunteers, 20% was directed to physical activity programs and 80% to nutrition programs.
The public costs to implement and maintain CSH are modest. They leveraged substantial local funding and in-kind contributions, underlining community support for healthy eating and active living. Where CSH is effective in preventing childhood overweight, it is most likely cost-effective too, as costs for future chronic diseases are mounting. CSH programs that are proven effective and cost-effective have enormous potential for broad implementation and for reducing the public health burden associated with obesity.
PubMed ID
22164557 View in PubMed
Less detail

Death in children with epilepsy: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189822
Source
Lancet. 2002 Jun 1;359(9321):1891-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2002
Author
Carol S Camfield
Peter R Camfield
Paul J Veugelers
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia, Halifax, Canada. Camfield@is.dal.ca
Source
Lancet. 2002 Jun 1;359(9321):1891-5
Date
Jun-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Epilepsy - classification - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Registries
Risk
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Families of children with newly diagnosed epilepsy worry about death during a seizure. We aimed to assess the frequency and causes of death of children with epilepsy.
We did a population-based cohort study. The Nova Scotia epilepsy cohort includes all children who developed epilepsy during 1977-85. In 1999, we matched names and birth dates with provincial health-care, death, and marriage registries. We examined death certificates, necropsy reports, and physician records of children who had died and contacted families if sudden unexpected death in epilepsy could have occurred. We measured the effect of sex, age, epilepsy type, and disorder sufficient to cause functional neurological deficit on death rate. We compared cohort mortality with rates in a reference population matched for age and sex.
26 (3.8%) of 692 children with epilepsy died. Frequency of death was 5.3 times higher (95% CI 2.29-8.32) than in the reference population in the 1980s and 8.8 times higher (4.16-13.43) in the 1990s. Kaplan-Meier curves showed 6.1% mortality 20 years after onset compared with 0.88% in the reference population. Deaths occurred in one (1%) of 97 children with absence epilepsy, 12 (2%) of 510 with partial and primary generalised epilepsy, and 13 (15%) of 85 with secondary generalised epilepsy. 22 deaths were caused by disorders sufficient to cause functional neurological deficit, one by probable sudden unexpected death in epilepsy, two by suicide, and one by homicide. Functional neurological deficit was the only independent determinant of mortality.
Death from epilepsy is uncommon in children without a severe neurological disorder sufficient to cause functional neurological deficit and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy is rare.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2002 Nov 23;360(9346):1698; author reply 1698-912457825
Comment In: Evid Based Nurs. 2003 Jan;6(1):2512546043
PubMed ID
12057550 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary intake and risk factors for poor diet quality among children in Nova Scotia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174637
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):212-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Paul J Veugelers
Angela L Fitzgerald
Elizabeth Johnston
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health & Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):212-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Energy intake
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Nova Scotia
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Schools
Students
Abstract
Public health policies promote healthy nutrition but evaluations of children's adherence to dietary recommendations and studies of risk factors of poor nutrition are scarce, despite the importance of diet for the temporal increase in the prevalence of childhood obesity. Here we examine dietary intake and risk factors for poor diet quality among children in Nova Scotia to provide direction for health policies and prevention initiatives.
In 2003, we surveyed 5,200 grade five students from 282 public schools in Nova Scotia, as well as their parents. We assessed students' dietary intake (Harvard's Youth Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire) and compared this with Canadian food group and nutrient recommendations. We summarized diet quality using the Diet Quality Index International, and used multilevel regression methods to evaluate potential child, parental and school risk factors for poor diet quality.
In Nova Scotia, 42.3% of children did not meet recommendations for milk products nor did they meet recommendations for the food groups 'Vegetables and fruit' (49.9%), 'Grain products' (54.4%) and 'Meat and alternatives' (73.7%). Children adequately met nutrient requirements with the exception of calcium and fibre, of which intakes were low, and dietary fat and sodium, of which intakes were high. Skipping meals and purchasing meals at school or fast-food restaurants were statistically significant determinants of poor diet. Parents' assessment of their own eating habits was positively associated with the quality of their children's diets.
Dietary intake among children in Nova Scotia is relatively poor. Explicit public health policies and prevention initiatives targeting children, their parents and schools may improve diet quality and prevent obesity.
PubMed ID
15913088 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary iron as a risk factor for myocardial infarction. Public health considerations for Nova Scotia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189151
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Jul-Aug;93(4):267-70
Publication Type
Article
Author
Darshaka Malaviarachchi
Paul J Veugelers
Alexandra M Yip
David R MacLean
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Jul-Aug;93(4):267-70
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet
Female
Humans
Iron - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Logistic Models
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Public Health Practice
Risk factors
Abstract
Epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that high levels of dietary iron and hemeiron can lead to myocardial injury. Lean meat, a primary source of iron and hemeiron, is promoted because it is lower in fat and cholesterol. Does lean meat put us at risk for myocardial infarction, and should we reconsider its promotion?
We analyzed the importance of dietary iron and hemeiron as a risk for myocardial infarction among 2,198 Nova Scotians who participated in a nutrition survey and who were followed for eight years, using logistic regression.
Acute myocardial infarction incidents occurred in 94 (4.3%) participants. We found no increased risk for myocardial infarction associated with high intake of iron and hemeiron.
Based on Nova Scotian data showing no increased risk for myocardial infarction with high intake of iron and hemeiron, there is no need for immediate reconsideration of promotion of lean meat.
PubMed ID
12154528 View in PubMed
Less detail

50 records – page 1 of 5.