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Acute respiratory infections among Indigenous children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104234
Source
Med J Aust. 2014 Jun 2;200(10):559-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2-2014
Author
Paul J Torzillo
Anne B Chang
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine and Department of Intensive Care, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. paul.torzillo@sydney.edu.au.
Source
Med J Aust. 2014 Jun 2;200(10):559-60
Date
Jun-2-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Med J Aust. 2014 Jun 2;200(10):591-424882491
PubMed ID
24882472 View in PubMed
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Improving the state of health hardware in Australian Indigenous housing: building more houses is not the only answer

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284428
Source
Pages 435-440 435-440
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
HEALTHY COMMUNITIES Improving the state of health hardware in Australian Indigenous housing: building more houses is not the only answer Paul Pholeros 1 , Tess Lea2 , Stephan Rainow1 , Tim Sowerbutts3 and Paul J. Torzillo 1 ' 4* 1 Healthabitat, Newport Beach, Sydney, Australia; 2
  1 document  
Author
Paul Pholeros
Tess Lea
Stephan Rainow
Tim Sowerbutts
Paul J. Torzillo
Author Affiliation
Healthabitat, Newport Beach, Sydney, Australia
Department of Gender and Cultural Studies, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
Q Social Research Consultants, Marrickville, Sydney, Australia
Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
Source
Pages 435-440 435-440
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Australia Cost-Benefit Analysis Health Status Housing*/economics Housing*/standards Housing*/statistics & numerical data Humans Oceanic Ancestry Group/statistics & numerical data*
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This article outlines a program of applied research and development known as Housing for Health that, over the period 1999-2012, targeted health-related improvements in housing for Indigenous householders in communities across regional and remote Australia. In essence, the program focuses on measuring the functionality of key appliances and structures (we term this "health hardware") against clear criteria and ensuring identified faults are fixed. METHODS: Detailed survey and assessment of all aspects of housing was undertaken, particularly focusing on the function of health hardware. All results were entered into a database and analyzed. RESULTS: The results demonstrate extremely poor initial performance of the health hardware. A key finding is that attention to maintenance of existing houses can be a cost-effective means of improving health outcomes and also suggests the need to superintend the health-conferring qualities of new infrastructure. We briefly outline the early foundations of the Housing for Health program, major findings from data gathered before and after improvements to household amenities, and our efforts to translate these findings into broader policy. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that simply injecting funds into housing construction is not sufficient for gaining maximum health benefit.
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Respiratory exacerbations in indigenous children from two countries with non-cystic fibrosis chronic suppurative lung disease/bronchiectasis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259648
Source
Chest. 2014 Sep;146(3):762-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Gregory J Redding
Rosalyn J Singleton
Patricia C Valery
Hayley Williams
Keith Grimwood
Peter S Morris
Paul J Torzillo
Gabrielle B McCallum
Lori Chikoyak
Robert C Holman
Anne B Chang
Source
Chest. 2014 Sep;146(3):762-74
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Australia - epidemiology
Bronchiectasis - drug therapy - epidemiology - ethnology
Bronchodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Cough - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Lung Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology - ethnology
Male
Population Groups
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Suppuration
Abstract
Acute respiratory exacerbations (AREs) cause morbidity and lung function decline in children with chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD) and bronchiectasis. In a prospective longitudinal cohort study, we determined the patterns of AREs and factors related to increased risks for AREs in children with CSLD/bronchiectasis.
Ninety-three indigenous children aged 0.5 to 8 years with CSLD/bronchiectasis in Australia (n = 57) and Alaska (n = 36) during 2004 to 2009 were followed for > 3 years. Standardized parent interviews, physical examinations, and medical record reviews were undertaken at enrollment and every 3 to 6 months thereafter.
Ninety-three children experienced 280 AREs (median = 2, range = 0-11 per child) during the 3-year period; 91 (32%) were associated with pneumonia, and 43 (15%) resulted in hospitalization. Of the 93 children, 69 (74%) experienced more than two AREs over the 3-year period, and 28 (30%) had more than one ARE in each study year. The frequency of AREs declined significantly over each year of follow-up. Factors associated with recurrent (two or more) AREs included age
PubMed ID
24811693 View in PubMed
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Zinc and vitamin A supplementation in Indigenous Australian children hospitalised with lower respiratory tract infection: a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170817
Source
Med J Aust. 2006 Feb 6;184(3):107-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-6-2006
Author
Anne B Chang
Paul J Torzillo
Naomi C Boyce
Andrew V White
Peter M Stewart
Gavin R Wheaton
David M Purdie
John Wakerman
Patricia C Valery
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Royal Children's Hospital, Herston Road, Herston, Brisbane, QLD 4029, Australia. annechang@ausdoctors.net
Source
Med J Aust. 2006 Feb 6;184(3):107-12
Date
Feb-6-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Dietary Supplements
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Male
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy
Trace Elements - therapeutic use
Vitamin A - therapeutic use
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Zinc - therapeutic use
Abstract
To evaluate the efficacy of supplementation with zinc and vitamin A in Indigenous children hospitalised with acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI).
Randomised controlled, 2-by-2 factorial trial of supplementation with zinc and vitamin A.
187 Indigenous children aged
PubMed ID
16460294 View in PubMed
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