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Correlates of continued tobacco use and intention to quit smoking among Russian cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139307
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2011 Dec;18(4):325-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Robert A Schnoll
Somasundaram Subramanian
Elisa Martinez
Paul F Engstrom
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, 3535 Market Street, 4th Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. schnoll@mail.med.upenn.edu
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2011 Dec;18(4):325-32
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Colorectal Neoplasms - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Russia - epidemiology
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Tobacco - adverse effects
Abstract
Tobacco use among cancer patients is associated with adverse health outcomes. Little attention has been paid to tobacco use among cancer patients in developing countries, including Russia, where tobacco use is extremely high, and there is little public health infrastructure to address this issue.
This study examined medical, socio-demographic, and psychological correlates of smoking status and intention to quit smoking among newly diagnosed Russian cancer patients.
A cross-sectional study was conducted with 294 current or former smokers newly diagnosed with cancer.
Compared with patients who quit smoking, patients who continued to smoke were more likely to report urges to smoke to satisfy positive reinforcing aspects of tobacco use. Compared with patients who were smoking and reported no intention to quit smoking in the next 3 months, patients who were smoking but intended to quit smoking reported higher levels of perceived risks associated with continued smoking and higher levels of self-efficacy to quit smoking.
As commitment to developing smoking cessation treatment programs for cancer patients in Russia emerges, these data can help guide the development of behavioral interventions to assist patients with quitting smoking, enhancing their chances for improved clinical outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21076900 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and correlates of tobacco use among Russian cancer patients: implications for the development of smoking cessation interventions at a cancer center in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170525
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2006;13(1):16-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Robert A Schnoll
Paul F Engstrom
Somasundaram Subramanian
Lev Demidov
Dustin B Wielt
Mourad Tighiouart
Author Affiliation
Fox Chase Cancer Center, Division of Population Science, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19012, USA. RA_Schnoll@fccc.edu
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2006;13(1):16-25
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Logistic Models
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow - epidemiology
Motivation
Prevalence
Risk-Taking
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation
Abstract
This study examined the rate of smoking among 399 cancer patients in Russia and assessed correlates of tobacco use and readiness to quit smoking. The results indicated that (a) 41.6% of patients were smokers; and (b) smokers were likely to be male, have lung or colorectal cancer, exhibit low levels of knowledge concerning the negative effects of smoking, report a low level of advantages to quitting smoking and a high level of disadvantages to quitting smoking, show low perceived risk for the adverse effects of smoking, and exhibit high fatalistic beliefs. Though certain findings converge well with data collected from U.S. samples of cancer patients, these results can guide the development of smoking interventions that address the specific needs of Russian cancer patients. In sum, this study fills a critical gap in knowledge concerning the epidemic of tobacco use in Russia and broadens research regarding tobacco use by cancer patients from the United States to the Russian Federation.
PubMed ID
16503837 View in PubMed
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Smoking cessation counseling by Russian oncologists: opportunities for intervention in the Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170526
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2006;13(1):8-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Robert A Schnoll
Paul F Engstrom
Somasundaram Subramanian
Lev Demidov
Dustin B Wielt
Author Affiliation
Fox Chase Cancer Center, Division of Population Science, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19012, USA. RA_Schnoll@fccc.edu
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2006;13(1):8-15
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Directive Counseling
Education, Medical, Continuing
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Oncology - education
Moscow
Physician's Practice Patterns
Smoking - prevention & control - psychology
Smoking Cessation - methods
Abstract
The goal of this study was to examine the degree to which Russian oncologists are trained in providing smoking cessation counseling to patients and to assess physician smoking cessation practices and attitudes about providing smoking cessation treatment. Sixty-three oncologists at a large cancer center in Moscow completed a brief survey. The results showed that Russian oncologists: (a) lack training in smoking interventions; (b) rarely offer cessation treatment; (c) exhibit beliefs about smoking that may serve as barriers to providing cessation counseling; and (d) desire training in cessation counseling. These results can be used to guide the development of smoking cessation training programs for Russian physicians.
PubMed ID
16503836 View in PubMed
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