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14th congress of combustion by-products and their health effects-origin, fate, and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270327
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 Apr;23(8):8141-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Eva Weidemann
Patrik L Andersson
Terry Bidleman
Christoffer Boman
Danielle J Carlin
Elena Collina
Stephania A Cormier
Sandra C Gouveia-Figueira
Brian K Gullett
Christer Johansson
Donald Lucas
Lisa Lundin
Staffan Lundstedt
Stellan Marklund
Malin L Nording
Nuria Ortuño
Asmaa A Sallam
Florian M Schmidt
Stina Jansson
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 Apr;23(8):8141-59
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The 14th International Congress on Combustion By-Products and Their Health Effects was held in Ume?, Sweden from June 14th to 17th, 2015. The Congress, mainly sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program and the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, focused on the "Origin, fate and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources". The international delegates included academic and government researchers, engineers, scientists, policymakers and representatives of industrial partners. The Congress provided a unique forum for the discussion of scientific advances in this research area since it addressed in combination the health-related issues and the environmental implications of combustion by-products. The scientific outcomes of the Congress included the consensus opinions that: (a) there is a correlation between human exposure to particulate matter and increased cardiac and respiratory morbidity and mortality; (b) because currently available data does not support the assessment of differences in health outcomes between biomass smoke and other particulates in outdoor air, the potential human health and environmental impacts of emerging air-pollution sources must be addressed. Assessment will require the development of new approaches to characterize combustion emissions through advanced sampling and analytical methods. The Congress also concluded the need for better and more sustainable e-waste management and improved policies, usage and disposal methods for materials containing flame retardants.
PubMed ID
26906006 View in PubMed
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Industrial and natural compounds in filter-feeding black fly larvae and water in 3 tundra streams.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298997
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2018 12; 37(12):3011-3017
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Darya Kupryianchyk
Reiner Giesler
Terry F Bidleman
Per Liljelind
Danny Chun Pong Lau
Ryan A Sponseller
Patrik L Andersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2018 12; 37(12):3011-3017
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Environmental monitoring
Flame Retardants - analysis
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis
Industrial Waste - analysis
Larva - metabolism
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Principal Component Analysis
Rivers - chemistry
Simuliidae - metabolism
Sweden
Tundra
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
We report concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, novel flame retardants, and naturally occurring bromoanisoles in water and filter-feeding black fly (Simuliidae) larvae in 3 tundra streams in northern Sweden. The results demonstrate that black fly larvae accumulate a wide range of organic contaminants and can be used as bioindicators of water pollution in Arctic streams. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:3011-3017. © 2018 SETAC.
PubMed ID
30183099 View in PubMed
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Industrial and natural compounds in filter-feeding black fly larvae and water in 3 tundra streams.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294772
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2018 Sep 05; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-05-2018
Author
Darya Kupryianchyk
Reiner Giesler
Terry F Bidleman
Per Liljelind
Danny Chun Pong Lau
Ryan A Sponseller
Patrik L Andersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2018 Sep 05; :
Date
Sep-05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
We report concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, novel flame retardants, and naturally occurring bromoanisoles in water and filter-feeding black fly (Simuliidae) larvae in 3 tundra streams in northern Sweden. The results demonstrate that black fly larvae accumulate a wide range of organic contaminants and can be used as bioindicators of water pollution in Arctic streams. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;9999:1-7. © 2018 SETAC.
PubMed ID
30183099 View in PubMed
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Mass fluxes per capita of organic contaminants from on-site sewage treatment facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292564
Source
Chemosphere. 2018 Jun; 201:864-873
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Kristin M Blum
Peter Haglund
Qiuju Gao
Lutz Ahrens
Meritxell Gros
Karin Wiberg
Patrik L Andersson
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Chemistry, Umeå University, SE-90187, Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: kristin.blum@umu.se.
Source
Chemosphere. 2018 Jun; 201:864-873
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Humans
Limit of Detection
Multivariate Analysis
Risk assessment
Rivers - chemistry
Sewage - chemistry
Sweden
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Purification - methods
Abstract
This study is the first attempt to quantify environmental fluxes per capita of organic contaminants discharged from on-site sewage treatment facilities (OSSFs) in affected recipients. Five sites were monitored around the River Fyris in Sweden: three mainly affected by OSSFs and two mainly affected by municipal sewage treatment plants (STPs). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to determine environmental concentrations of 30 anthropogenic contaminants, including organophosphorus compounds, rubber and plastic additives, UV stabilizers, fragrances, surfactant ingredients and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Uni- and multivariate statistical analysis of the most frequently detected contaminants showed that median fluxes per capita of tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate, tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate, tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate, and n-butylbenzene sulfonamide were similar at OSSF and STP sites, but the mass fluxes per capita of tris-(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate, 2-(methylthio)benzothiazole, and galaxolide, were significantly lower (~2-3-fold) at OSSF sites than at STP sites (Mann-Whitney, a?=?0.05). Differences between these sites were larger in samples collected in summer and autumn than in samples collected in winter. Deviations likely originated from differences in fate processes and distances between source and sampling sites. Further studies are needed to characterize mass fluxes per capita of contaminants in waters that directly receive discharges from OSSFs.
PubMed ID
29567470 View in PubMed
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Non-target screening and prioritization of potentially persistent, bioaccumulating and toxic domestic wastewater contaminants and their removal in on-site and large-scale sewage treatment plants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292281
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Jan 01; 575:265-275
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-01-2017
Author
Kristin M Blum
Patrik L Andersson
Gunno Renman
Lutz Ahrens
Meritxell Gros
Karin Wiberg
Peter Haglund
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Chemistry, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: kristin.blum@umu.se.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Jan 01; 575:265-275
Date
Jan-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Sewage - chemistry
Sweden
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Waste Water - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
On-site sewage treatment facilities (OSSFs), which are used to reduce nutrient emissions in rural areas, were screened for anthropogenic compounds with two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS). The detected compounds were prioritized based on their persistence, bioaccumulation, ecotoxicity, removal efficiency, and concentrations. This comprehensive prioritization strategy, which was used for the first time on OSSF samples, ranked galaxolide, a-tocopheryl acetate, octocrylene, 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyn-4,7-diol, several chlorinated organophosphorus flame retardants and linear alkyl benzenes as the most relevant compounds being emitted from OSSFs. Twenty-six target analytes were then selected for further removal efficiency analysis, including compounds from the priority list along with substances from the same chemical classes, and a few reference compounds. We found significantly better removal of two polar contaminants 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyn-4,7-diol (p=0.0003) and tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (p=0.005) in soil beds, a common type of OSSF in Sweden, compared with conventional sewage treatment plants. We also report median removal efficiencies in OSSFs for compounds not studied in this context before, viz. a-tocopheryl acetate (96%), benzophenone (83%), 2-(methylthio)benzothiazole (64%), 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyn-4,7-diol (33%), and a range of organophosphorus flame retardants (19% to 98%). The environmental load of the top prioritized compounds in soil bed effluents were in the thousands of nanogram per liter range, viz. 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyn-4,7-diol (3000ngL-1), galaxolide (1400ngL-1), octocrylene (1200ngL-1), and a-tocopheryl acetate (660ngL-1).
PubMed ID
27744155 View in PubMed
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The presence and partitioning behavior of flame retardants in waste, leachate, and air particles from Norwegian waste-handling facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288015
Source
J Environ Sci (China). 2017 Dec;62:115-132
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Nicolas A O Morin
Patrik L Andersson
Sarah E Hale
Hans Peter H Arp
Source
J Environ Sci (China). 2017 Dec;62:115-132
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Bromobenzenes - analysis
Electronic Waste - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Flame Retardants - analysis
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis
Norway
Plastics
Polybrominated Biphenyls - analysis
Polycyclic Compounds - analysis
Waste Disposal Facilities
Waste management
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Flame retardants in commercial products eventually make their way into the waste stream. Herein the presence of flame retardants in Norwegian landfills, incineration facilities and recycling sorting/defragmenting facilities is investigated. These facilities handled waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), vehicles, digestate, glass, combustibles, bottom ash and fly ash. The flame retardants considered included polybrominated diphenyl ethers (?BDE-10) as well as dechlorane plus, polybrominated biphenyls, hexabromobenzene, pentabromotoluene and pentabromoethylbenzene (collectively referred to as ?FR-7). Plastic, WEEE and vehicles contained the largest amount of flame retardants (?BDE-10: 45,000-210,000µg/kg; ?FR-7: 300-13,000µg/kg). It was hypothesized leachate and air concentrations from facilities that sort/defragment WEEE and vehicles would be the highest. This was supported for total air phase concentrations (?BDE-10: 9000-195,000pg/m3 WEEE/vehicle facilities, 80-900pg/m3 in incineration/sorting and landfill sites), but not for water leachate concentrations (e.g., ?BDE-10: 15-3500ng/L in WEEE/Vehicle facilities and 1-250ng/L in landfill sites). Landfill leachate exhibited similar concentrations as WEEE/vehicle sorting and defragmenting facility leachate. To better account for concentrations in leachates at the different facilities, waste-water partitioning coefficients, Kwaste were measured (for the first time to our knowledge for flame retardants). WEEE and plastic waste had elevated Kwaste compared to other wastes, likely because flame retardants are directly added to these materials. The results of this study have implications for the development of strategies to reduce exposure and environmental emissions of flame retardants in waste and recycled products through improved waste management practices.
PubMed ID
29289283 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.