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Affordability of a nutritious diet for income assistance recipients in Nova Scotia (2002-2010).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121472
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 May-Jun;103(3):183-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patricia L Williams
Cynthia G Watt
Michelle Amero
Barbara J Anderson
Ilya Blum
Rebecca Green-LaPierre
Christine P Johnson
Debra E Reimer
Author Affiliation
Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, NS. patty.williams@msvu.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 May-Jun;103(3):183-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet - economics
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Poverty - economics
Social Welfare - economics
Abstract
This study assessed the affordability of a basic nutritious diet for selected household types relying on income assistance (IA) by comparing potential incomes to the costs of the National Nutritious Food Basket (NNFB) and other essential expenditures in Nova Scotia from 2002 to 2010, and examined the adequacy of IA allowances during this time period.
The cost of the NNFB was surveyed across a random sample of grocery stores in NS during five time periods: 2002, 2004/05, 2007, 2008 and 2010, and was factored into affordability scenarios for three household types relying on IA: a family of four, a lone mother with three children, and a lone male. Essential monthly expenses were deducted from total net income to determine if adequate funds remained for the NNFB.
For each time period examined, the findings demonstrated that all household types faced a significant monthly deficit if they purchased a basic nutritious diet. In each household scenario, the potential monthly deficits increased from 2002 to 2010, ranging from $112 in 2002 for a lone mother with three children to $523 in 2010 for a lone male.
Despite increases in allowances, these findings suggest that the risk of food insecurity has increased for IA-dependent households in NS. To address this public health challenge, public health practitioners must advocate for integrated, progressive and sustainable social welfare policies that ensure that individuals and families relying on IA have adequate income and other supports to meet their basic needs, including access to a healthy diet.
PubMed ID
22905636 View in PubMed
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Can Canadian seniors on public pensions afford a nutritious diet?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157087
Source
Can J Aging. 2008;27(1):69-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Rebecca J Green
Patricia L Williams
C Shanthi Johnson
Ilya Blum
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Human Nutrition, Mount Saint Vincent University, Canada.
Source
Can J Aging. 2008;27(1):69-79
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Diet - economics
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Male
Nutritive Value
Pensions
Abstract
This study examined whether Canada's public pensions (Old Age Security and Canada Pension Plan) provided adequate income for seniors living in Nova Scotia in 2005 to afford a basic nutritious diet. Monthly incomes were compared to essential monthly expenses for four household scenarios: (a) married couple, 80 years and 78 years, in urban Nova Scotia; (b) single male, 77 years in rural Nova Scotia; (c) a couple, 70 years and 65 years, in rural Nova Scotia; (d) widowed female, 85 years, in urban Nova Scotia. The monthly food costs for the four households were CAN$313.32, $193.83, $316.71, and $150.89, respectively. Results showed that both single-member households lacked the necessary funds for a nutritious diet, while living with a partner seemed to protect against inadequate financial resources. These findings illustrate the need to improve Canada's retirement systems to ensure all seniors have adequate financial resources to meet their basic needs-including nutritious food-prevent chronic disease, and ultimately improve quality of life.
PubMed ID
18492638 View in PubMed
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Can households earning minimum wage in Nova Scotia afford a nutritious diet?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165814
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Nov-Dec;97(6):430-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patricia L Williams
Christine P Johnson
Meredith L V Kratzmann
C Shanthi Jacob Johnson
Barbara J Anderson
Cathy Chenhall
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Human Nutrition, Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, NS. patty.williams@msvu.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Nov-Dec;97(6):430-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Costs and Cost Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Diet - economics
Family Characteristics
Female
Financing, Personal - statistics & numerical data
Focus Groups
Food - economics
Food Industry - economics
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Humans
Male
Nova Scotia
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Requirements
Poverty - classification
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - classification
Abstract
To assess the affordability of a nutritious diet for households earning minimum wage in Nova Scotia.
Food costing data were collected in 43 randomly selected grocery stores throughout NS in 2002 using the National Nutritious Food Basket (NNFB). To estimate the affordability of a nutritious diet for households earning minimum wage, average monthly costs for essential expenses were subtracted from overall income to see if enough money remained for the cost of the NNFB. This was calculated for three types of household: 1) two parents and two children; 2) lone parent and two children; and 3) single male. Calculations were also made for the proposed 2006 minimum wage increase with expenses adjusted using the Consumer Price Index (CPI).
The monthly cost of the NNFB priced in 2002 for the three types of household was 572.90 dollars, 351.68 dollars, and 198.73 dollars, respectively. Put into the context of basic living, these data showed that Nova Scotians relying on minimum wage could not afford to purchase a nutritious diet and meet their basic needs, placing their health at risk. These basic expenses do not include other routine costs, such as personal hygiene products, household and laundry cleaners, and prescriptions and costs associated with physical activity, education or savings for unexpected expenses.
People working at minimum wage in Nova Scotia have not had adequate income to meet basic needs, including a nutritious diet. The 2006 increase in minimum wage to 7.15 dollars/hr is inadequate to ensure that Nova Scotians working at minimum wage are able to meet these basic needs. Wage increases and supplements, along with supports for expenses such as childcare and transportation, are indicated to address this public health problem.
PubMed ID
17203719 View in PubMed
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Just the Berries: concerns about young women's nutrition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183874
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2003 Aug;49:974-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Doris E Gillis
Patricia L Williams
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition at St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, NS.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2003 Aug;49:974-6
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Adult
Canada
Diet
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Physician's Role
Physicians, Family
Women's health
Notes
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2000 Sep-Oct;91(5):381-511089294
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Nov 28;163(11):1429-3311192647
Cites: Prev Med. 2001 Apr;32(4):303-1011304090
Cites: Pediatrics. 2001 Jun;107(6):1381-611389261
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2001 Jul;155(7):813-711434849
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2001 Jul;101(7):798-80211478479
Cites: Can J Diet Pract Res. 2001 Summer;62(2):61-911518556
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1986 Apr;86(4):493-93958400
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1995 Feb;95(2):180-6, 189, quiz 187-87852684
Cites: Prev Med. 1996 Sep-Oct;25(5):497-5058888316
Cites: Proc Nutr Soc. 1997 Mar;56(1B):291-3039168540
Cites: Prim Care. 1998 Mar;25(1):193-2109469923
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 2003 Aug;49:953-712943347
PubMed ID
12943354 View in PubMed
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The 'wonderfulness' of children's feeding programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185378
Source
Health Promot Int. 2003 Jun;18(2):163-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Patricia L Williams
Lynn McIntyre
Jutta B Dayle
Kim Raine
Author Affiliation
Mount Saint Vincent University, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Health Promot Int. 2003 Jun;18(2):163-70
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Dietary Services - standards
Food Services - standards
Health promotion
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Poverty
Program Evaluation
Public Assistance
Schools
Abstract
When people involved in children's feeding programs were asked to describe them, without exception they were described using phrases that reflected the perception of 'wonderfulness'. This paper critically analyses the 'wonderfulness' of children's feeding programs by examining the language used to describe these programs, and the features of a 'wonderful' program through an analysis of a multi-site, qualitative case study of nine diverse programs in Atlantic Canada. When participants justified their comments about the 'wonderfulness' of children's feeding programs, they did so based upon five perceptions of program strengths: enhanced family coping; providing good food and nutrition; socializing and making friends; behaving well in school; and volunteerism. We suggest that programs can be designed to be innately 'wonderful' if they are community- and charity-based, support a noble cause such as the elimination of child hunger, engage good people as donors and volunteers, and provide a direct service to children apart from their families. We challenge health promoters to beware of the 'wonderful' program; its 'wonderfulness' may actually be masking unintended negative impacts upon its participants.
PubMed ID
12746388 View in PubMed
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