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Fine particulate air pollution, resuspended road dust and respiratory health among symptomatic children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202972
Source
Eur Respir J. 1999 Feb;13(2):266-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
P. Tiittanen
K L Timonen
J. Ruuskanen
A. Mirme
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, Division of Environmental Health, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1999 Feb;13(2):266-73
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Child
Chronic Disease
Dust - adverse effects - analysis
Finland
Humans
Particle Size
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
Abstract
The short-term association of particulate air pollution with peak expiratory flow rate (PEF) and respiratory symptoms was examined. Forty-nine children with chronic respiratory symptoms aged 8-13 yrs were followed daily for six weeks in spring, 1995, in Kuopio, Finland. Daily concentrations of particulate material with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter
PubMed ID
10065666 View in PubMed
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Fish consumption, omega-3 fatty acids, and environmental contaminants in relation to low-grade inflammation and early atherosclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119561
Source
Environ Res. 2013 Jan;120:43-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
A W Turunen
A. Jula
A L Suominen
S. Männistö
J. Marniemi
H. Kiviranta
P. Tiittanen
H. Karanko
L. Moilanen
M S Nieminen
Y A Kesäniemi
M. Kähönen
P K Verkasalo
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Neulaniementie 4, P.O. Box 95, FI-70210 Kuopio, Finland. anu.turunen@thl.fi
Source
Environ Res. 2013 Jan;120:43-54
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Atherosclerosis - chemically induced
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Female
Finland
Humans
Inflammation - chemically induced
Male
Middle Aged
Seafood - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Fish consumption and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake are shown to protect from cardiovascular diseases (CVD). However, most fish contain environmental contaminants such as dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and methylmercury (MeHg) that may have adverse effects on cardiovascular health.
Our aim was to elucidate the associations of fish consumption, omega-3 PUFAs, environmental contaminants with low-grade inflammation, early atherosclerosis, and traditional CVD risk factors.
The Health 2000 survey participants (n=1173) represented the general Finnish population and the Fishermen study participants (n=255) represented a population with high fish consumption and high exposure to environmental contaminants. Model-adjusted geometric means and tests for linear trend were calculated for CVD risk factors by tertiles of fish consumption and serum omega-3 PUFAs, and additionally in the Fishermen study only, by tertiles of serum PCDD/F+PCB, and blood MeHg.
Serum triglyceride decreased across omega-3 PUFA tertiles in both sexes and studies. Insulin resistance, C-reactive protein, tumour necrosis factor a, and interleukin 6 decreased across omega-3 PUFA tertiles among the Health 2000 survey participants. Among the Fishermen study men, insulin resistance and arterial stiffness indicated by ß-stiffness index tended to increase and the RR estimate for carotid artery plaque tended to decrease across tertiles of PCDD/F+PCB and MeHg.
Previously established hypotriglyceridemic and anti-inflammatory effects of omega-3 PUFAs were seen also in this study. The hypothesised favourable effect on insulin sensitivity and arterial elasticity was suggested to be counteracted by high exposure to environmental contaminants but the effect on plaque prevalence appeared not to be harmful.
PubMed ID
23089109 View in PubMed
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Nitrogen dioxide exposure assessment and cough among preschool children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196297
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2000 Nov-Dec;55(6):431-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Mukala
S. Alm
P. Tiittanen
R O Salonen
M. Jantunen
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2000 Nov-Dec;55(6):431-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Cough - epidemiology - etiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Poisson Distribution
Risk factors
Rural Population
Sampling Studies
Urban Population
Abstract
The association between exposure to ambient air nitrogen dioxide and cough was evaluated in a panel study among 162 children aged 3-6 y. The weekly average nitrogen dioxide exposure was assessed with Palmes-tube measurements in three ways: (1) personally, (2) outside day-care centers, and (3) inside day-care centers. Ambient air nitrogen dioxide concentrations were obtained from the local network that monitored air quality. The parents recorded cough episodes daily in a diary. The risk of cough increased significantly (relative risk = 3.63; 95% confidence interval = 1.41, 9.30) in the highest personal nitrogen dioxide exposure category in winter, and a nonsignificant positive trend was noted for the other assessment groups. In spring, risk increased nonsignificantly in all exposure-assessment groups, except for the fixed-site monitoring assessment. It is important that investigators select an exposure-assessment method sufficiently accurate to reflect the effective pollutant dose in subjects.
PubMed ID
11128882 View in PubMed
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Personally measured weekly exposure to NO2 and respiratory health among preschool children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201161
Source
Eur Respir J. 1999 Jun;13(6):1411-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
K. Mukala
J. Pekkanen
P. Tiittanen
S. Alm
R O Salonen
J. Tuomisto
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Environmental Medicine, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1999 Jun;13(6):1411-7
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Oxidants, Photochemical - adverse effects
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - diagnosis
Seasons
Abstract
Nitrogen dioxide is known as a deep lung irritant. The aim of this study was to find out whether the relatively low ambient air NO2 concentrations in the northern city of Helsinki had an impact on the respiratory health of children. The association between personal exposure to ambient air NO2 and respiratory health was investigated in a 13-week follow-up study among 163 preschool children aged 3-6 yrs. Personal weekly average exposure to NO2 was measured by passive diffusion samplers attached to the outer garments. Symptoms were recorded daily in a diary by the parents. Among 53 children, peak expiratory flow (PEF) was measured at home in the mornings and evenings. The association between NO2 exposure and respiratory symptoms was examined with Poisson regression. The median personal NO2 exposure was 21.1 microg x m(-3) (range 4-99 microg x m(-3)). An increased risk of cough was associated with increasing NO2 exposure (risk ratio = 1.52; 95% confidence interval 1.00-2.31). There was no such association between personal weekly NO2 exposure and nasal symptoms, but a nonsignificant negative association was found between the exposure and the weekly average deviation in PEF. In conclusion, even low ambient air NO2 concentrations can increase the risk of respiratory symptoms among preschool children.
PubMed ID
10445621 View in PubMed
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Personal NO2 exposures of preschool children in Helsinki.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206549
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 1998 Jan-Mar;8(1):79-100
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Alm
K. Mukala
P. Pasanen
P. Tiittanen
J. Ruuskanen
J. Tuomisto
M J Jantunen
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Health, KTL-National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland. Sari.Alm@ktl.fi
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 1998 Jan-Mar;8(1):79-100
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Child
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Seasons
Suburban Population
Urban Population
Abstract
Weekly personal NO2 exposures of 246 children aged 3-6 years were measured with Palmes tubes during 13 weeks in winter and spring in 1991. Measurements were made in eight day-care centers in the downtown and suburban areas of Helsinki, Finland. At the same time, inside and outside NO2 concentration of the day-care centers and the ambient air fixed site measurements were conducted. Palmes tubes were found to be applicable for NO2 exposure measurements of preschool children, but rather high sample losses could be expected. The geometric mean of personal NO2 exposure levels of 13-week period was 26.5 micrograms/m3 in the downtown and 17.5 micrograms/m3 in the suburban area. Gas stove and smoking at home increased significantly personal exposure to NO2. The weekly population NO2 exposure correlated rather poorly with the fixed site ambient air NO2 levels (R2 = 0.37), but much better with the NO2 levels inside and outside the day-care centers (R2 = 0.88 and 0.86). In the suburban and downtown groups the between children variations in the NO2 exposures were only 14% and 28% of the total variations, which were dominated by the within child variation. Stationary measurements at the ambient air fixed sites and inside and outside the day-care centers explained the variation in personal exposures of the children well during the spring, but not during the winter. A regression model, where data from outside day-care center measurements, fixed ambient air monitors, residential area and home characteristics (i.e., gas stove, smoking inside at home, type of dwelling) were included, explained 32% of the personal NO2 exposure variation in winter and 67% in spring. In the absence of personal exposure measurements, both stationary measurements and questionnaire information are useful in estimating variations in personal exposures.
PubMed ID
9470107 View in PubMed
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Seasonal exposure to NO2 and respiratory symptoms in preschool children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212224
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 1996 Apr-Jun;6(2):197-210
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Mukala
J. Pekkanen
P. Tiittanen
S. Alm
R O Salonen
M. Jantunen
J. Tuomisto
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute Kuopio, Finland. kristiina.mukala@ktl.fi
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 1996 Apr-Jun;6(2):197-210
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Incidence
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects - analysis
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Seasons
Suburban Population
Urban Population
Abstract
One hundred seventy-two preschool children, aged three to six years, who attended municipal day-care centers in central and suburban areas of Helsinki, were followed up for seven weeks during the winter season and for eight weeks during the spring season in 1991. For each child, the weekly average NO2 exposure was estimated using passive samplers attached to the outer garments of the children during their everyday activities. Respiratory symptoms were recorded in daily diaries by the parents. The median of personally measured seasonal NO2 exposures was 21 micrograms/m3 (range 11-45.8 micrograms/m3). The seasonal median NO2 exposure was significantly larger (p
PubMed ID
8792297 View in PubMed
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Ultrafine particles in urban air and respiratory health among adult asthmatics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194339
Source
Eur Respir J. 2001 Mar;17(3):428-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
P. Penttinen
K L Timonen
P. Tiittanen
A. Mirme
J. Ruuskanen
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2001 Mar;17(3):428-35
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution - analysis
Asthma - physiopathology
Finland
Humans
Particle Size
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Urban health
Abstract
Airborne particles are associated with adverse health effects and contribute to excess mortality in epidemiological studies. A recent hypothesis proposes that the high numbers of ultrafine (
PubMed ID
11405521 View in PubMed
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Urban air pollution, and asthma and COPD hospital emergency room visits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158866
Source
Thorax. 2008 Jul;63(7):635-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
J I Halonen
T. Lanki
T. Yli-Tuomi
M. Kulmala
P. Tiittanen
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute (KTL), Environmental Epidemiology Unit, PO Box 95, FIN-70701 Kuopio, Finland. jaana.halonen@ktl.fi
Source
Thorax. 2008 Jul;63(7):635-41
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Asthma - chemically induced
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Particulate Matter - toxicity
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - chemically induced
Urban health
Vehicle Emissions - toxicity
Abstract
There is little previous information of the effects of size fractioned particulate air pollution and source specific fine particles (PM(2.5); or=65 years).
Three to 5 day lagged increases in asthma visits were found among children in association with nucleation (
Notes
Comment In: Thorax. 2008 Jul;63(7):574-618587030
PubMed ID
18267984 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.