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Adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98176
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
D. Iggman
J. Arnlöv
B. Vessby
T. Cederholm
P. Sjögren
U. Risérus
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Aged
Chromatography, Gas
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Docosahexaenoic Acids - analysis
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - analysis
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Glucose Clamp Technique
Health Surveys
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Palmitic Acid - analysis
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Dietary fatty acids may affect insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue fatty acid composition partly reflects long-term dietary intake, but data from large studies regarding relationships with insulin sensitivity are lacking. We aimed to determine the association between adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly Swedish men. METHODS: In a cross-sectional analysis of the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n = 795, mean age 71 years), adipose tissue biopsies were obtained and fatty acid composition was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Insulin sensitivity was measured directly by a euglycaemic clamp. RESULTS: Palmitic acid (16:0), the major saturated fatty acid (SFA) in the diet and in adipose tissue, was negatively correlated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.14), as were 16:1 n-7 (r = -0.15), 20:3 n-6 (r = -0.31), 20:4 n-6 (r = -0.38), 22:4 n-6 (r = -0.37) and 22:5 n-3 (r = -0.24; p
Notes
RefSource: Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):799-801
PubMed ID
20127308 View in PubMed
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Attitudes and perceptions towards oral hygiene tasks among geriatric nursing home staff.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136665
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2011 Aug;9(3):199-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
M. Forsell
P. Sjögren
E. Kullberg
O. Johansson
P. Wedel
B. Herbst
J. Hoogstraate
Author Affiliation
Oral Care, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2011 Aug;9(3):199-203
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Cognitive Therapy
Dementia - nursing
Health Education, Dental
Health status
Homes for the Aged - manpower
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nurses' Aides - education - psychology
Nursing Homes - manpower
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient compliance
Questionnaires
Sweden
Teaching - methods
Abstract
To assess attitudes and perceptions towards oral hygiene tasks among geriatric nursing home staff, before and after a dental hygiene education.
A survey questionnaire was distributed to the nursing staff (n = 105), at a geriatric nursing home in Stockholm, Sweden.
The response rate to the questionnaire was 83%. A vast majority (87%) of the nursing staff considered oral hygiene tasks unpleasant. The main reason for considering oral care unpleasant was a perceived unwillingness from the residents. The perceived unwillingness from the residents among the nursing staff was reduced after the dental hygiene education (chi-square test, P = 0.02). A vast majority of the nursing staff experienced, always or sometimes, resistance from the residents towards oral care.
Nursing home staff members consider oral care tasks unpleasant, and frequently experience resistance from the nursing home residents towards oral care. The perceived unwillingness from the residents is reduced after an advanced dental hygiene education. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effects of education on nursing staff's attitudes and perceptions towards oral care tasks, with the overall aim of improving the oral health among older people in hospitals and nursing homes.
PubMed ID
21356019 View in PubMed
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[Causes of pain and treatment effect in patients with cancer referred to a multidisciplinary pain clinic]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24544
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Jan 13;154(3):134-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-13-1992
Author
A M Banning
P. Sjøgren
H. Henriksen
Author Affiliation
Smerteklinikken, Finseninstitutet, Rigshospitalet.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Jan 13;154(3):134-7
Date
Jan-13-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesia - methods - psychology
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - therapy
Oncology Service, Hospital
Pain - etiology
Pain Measurement
Palliative Care - methods - psychology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The causes of pain were analysed in 200 patients referred to a multidisciplinary pain clinic for cancer patients. In 158 patients, pain caused directly by tumour growth was found, 116 patients had pain secondary to the cancer disease or treatment while 33 patients had pain caused by factors unrelated to the cancer disease. The patients had many different combinations of causes of pain and the majority had more than one cause of pain. At the first contact and after treatment for 1-2 weeks, the patients were asked whether they had pain on movement, at rest or pain which interrupted sleep. After treatment for 1-2 weeks and after treatment for more than two weeks, the patients assessed the relief of pain obtained (none, slight, moderate, considerable, complete). The majority of patients achieved relief of pain at rest and during sleep while movement was still accompanied by pain in a number of patients. The majority of patients considered that the relief of pain obtained was moderate or considerable. Treatment consisted of adjustment of medication, blockades and epidural opioids supplemented by psychological intervention and help from social workers in selected patients.
PubMed ID
1371199 View in PubMed
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Chronic non-cancer pain and the epidemic prescription of opioids in the Danish population: trends from 2000 to 2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278964
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2016 May;60(5):623-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
H. Birke
G P Kurita
P. Sjøgren
J. Højsted
M K Simonsen
K. Juel
O. Ekholm
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2016 May;60(5):623-33
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics, Opioid - therapeutic use
Benzodiazepines
Chronic Pain - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Therapy, Combination
Drug Utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Opioid-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Population
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Chronic pain has serious consequences for individuals and society. In addition, opioid prescription for chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) has become more frequent. This study aims to examine the trends regarding the prevalence of CNCP, dispensed opioids, and concurrent use of benzodiazepine (BZD)/BZD-related drugs in the Danish population.
Data from the cross-sectional national representative Danish Health and Morbidity Surveys (2000, 2005, 2010, and 2013) were combined with The Danish National Prescription Registry at an individual level. The study populations varied between 5000 and 13,000 individuals =16 years (response rates: 51-63%). Respondents completed a self-administered questionnaire, which included the analyzed items on identification of chronic pain (=6 months).
From 2000 to 2013, the prevalence of CNCP increased and subsequently the annual prevalence of opioid use from 4.1% to 5.7% among CNCP individuals. Higher CNCP prevalence was related to female gender, no cohabitation partner, short education, non-Western origin, and overweight/obesity. In addition, women with CNCP, especially >65 years, became more frequent users of opioids and used higher doses than men. Concurrent use of BZD/BZD-related drugs decreased (13%) from 2010 to 2013, still one-third of long-term opioid user were co-medicated with these drugs.
The use of opioids has increased in Denmark, especially among elderly women. The concurrent use of BZD/BZD-related drugs has decreased from 2010 to 2013, but still one-third of long-term opioid users were co-medicated.
PubMed ID
26861026 View in PubMed
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The Danish version of the questionnaire on pain communication: preliminary validation in cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151363
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2009 Jul;53(6):807-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
R. Jacobsen
C. Møldrup
L. Christrup
P. Sjøgren
O B Hansen
Author Affiliation
Section for Social Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. raj@farma.ku.dk
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2009 Jul;53(6):807-15
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Anxiety - psychology
Cognition - physiology
Communication
Denmark
Depression - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications
Pain - etiology - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The modified version of the patients' Perceived Involvement in Care Scale (M-PICS) is a tool designed to assess cancer patients' perceptions of patient-health care provider pain communication process. The objective of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the shortened Danish version of the M-PICS (SDM-PICS).
The validated English version of the M-PICS was translated into Danish following the repeated back-translation procedure. Cancer patients were recruited for the study from specialized pain management facilities.
Thirty-three patients responded to the SDM-PICS, Danish Barriers Questionnaire II, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Brief Pain Inventory Pain Severity Scale. A factor analysis of the SDM-PICS resulted in two factors: Factor one, patient information, consisted of four items assessing the extent to which the patient shared information with his/her health care provider, and Factor two, health care provider information, consisted of four items measuring the degree to which a health care provider was perceived as the one who shares information. Two separate items addressed the perceived level of information exchange between the patient and the health care provider. The SDM-PICS total had an internal consistency of 0.88. The SDM-PICS scores were positively related to pain relief and inversely related to the measures of cognitive pain management barriers, anxiety, and reported pain levels.
The SDM-PICS seems to be a reliable and valid measure of perceived patient-health care provider communication in the context of cancer pain.
PubMed ID
19388898 View in PubMed
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[Denmark's first research facility in palliative medicine. Organization and research strategy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205461
Source
Nord Med. 1998 May;113(5):147-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
L. Pedersen
P. Sjøgren
Author Affiliation
Palliativ medicinsk afdeling, Bispebjerg hospital, København.
Source
Nord Med. 1998 May;113(5):147-50
Date
May-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Humans
Palliative Care
Research
Abstract
Denmark's first palliative medicine research unit is now being set up at Bispebjerg Hospital, with single-room and two double-room ward. The multidisciplinary team consists of doctors, a psychologist, nurses, a physiotherapist, an ergotherapist, a medical social worker, a priest and a dietician. An out-patient facility is also being established to enable patients to choose between hospitalisation out-patient treatment or home treatment by appropriate staff. Another aspect of palliative medicine is care of the patient's family members. The intervention offered at our facility is led by a psychologist, and consists primarily of counselling. With its limited clinical opacity, the department of palliative medicine is first and foremost a research and development facility. The first chair in palliative medicine in Denmark was conferred upon the department in 1998.
PubMed ID
9617162 View in PubMed
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Dental status in nursing home residents with domiciliary dental care in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290213
Source
Community Dent Health. 2017 Dec 01; 34(4):203-207
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-01-2017
Author
P Andersson
S Renvert
P Sjogren
M Zimmerman
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University Kristianstad 291 88, Sweden.
Source
Community Dent Health. 2017 Dec 01; 34(4):203-207
Date
Dec-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Care for Aged
Female
Home Care Services
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Male
Nursing Homes
Oral Health
Sweden
Abstract
To describe the dental health status of elderly people in nursing homes receiving domiciliary dental care.
Case note review.
Nursing homes in 8 Swedish counties.
Care dependent elderly people (=65 years).
Clinical data, including the number of remaining natural teeth, missing and decayed teeth (manifest dental caries) and root remnants, recorded by dentists according to standard practices. Medical and dental risk assessments were performed.
Data were available for 20,664 patients. Most were women (69.1%), with a mean age of 87.1 years (SD 7.42, range 65-109). The mean age for men was 83.5 years (SD 8.12, range 65-105). Two or more medical conditions were present in most of the population. A total of 16,210 individuals had existing teeth of whom 10,974 (67.7%) had manifest caries. The mean number of teeth with caries was 5.0 (SD 5.93) corresponding to 22.8% of existing teeth. One in four individuals were considered to have a very high risk in at least one professional dental risk assessment category.
Care dependent elderly in nursing homes have very poor oral health. There is a need to focus on the oral health-related quality of life for this group of frail elderly during their final period of life.
PubMed ID
29136361 View in PubMed
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Development of health-related quality of life and symptoms in patients with advanced cancer in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290829
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2018 May; 27(3):e12843
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2018
Author
M Augustussen
M L Pedersen
L Hounsgaard
H Timm
P Sjøgren
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nursing and Health Science, Ilisimatusarfik, University of Greenland, Nuuk, Greenland.
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2018 May; 27(3):e12843
Date
May-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
A prospective national cohort study assessed the development of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and symptoms in adult patients undergoing treatment and care for advanced cancer in Greenland. HRQol was examined by EORTC QLQ-C30 version 3.0 questionnaire monthly for 4 months. Changes over time and between-group comparisons were examined. Of 58 patients included in the study, 47% completed the questionnaire four times. Functioning was generally high, and improved social functioning was observed after 1 and 2 months. The highest symptom score was for fatigue followed by pain and nausea/vomiting. A high score for financial problems remained unchanged during the entire period. Patients with higher income had reduced pain intensity (p = .03) and diarrhoea (p = .05) than patients with income below the poverty line. After 1 month, reduction in pain intensity was observed for Nuuk citizens compared with non-Nuuk citizens (p = .05). After 2 months, non-Nuuk citizens reported improved social functioning compared with Nuuk citizens (p = .05). After 3 months, Global Health in Nuuk citizens was improved compared with non-Nuuk citizens (p = .05). An important clinical finding was that patients' needs for support are related to social status, and geographical factors should be taken into account when planning palliative care.
Notes
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2002 Apr;38(6):788-94 PMID 11937313
Cites: J Telemed Telecare. 2007;13(2):74-8 PMID 17359570
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2012 Sep;20(9):2097-103 PMID 22076621
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2006 Mar;31(3):199-206 PMID 16563314
Cites: Palliat Med. 2009 Jul;23(5):432-40 PMID 19304808
Cites: Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2017 Jun;28:92-97 PMID 28478862
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2011 Jan 31;11:20 PMID 21281470
Cites: J Rural Health. 2006 Spring;22(2):174-81 PMID 16606431
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2016 Nov;68:73-81 PMID 27721057
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2011;11(3):1784 PMID 21848359
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2014 May;23(4):1387-94 PMID 24178630
Cites: Qual Life Res. 1996 Dec;5(6):555-67 PMID 8993101
Cites: Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2018 May;27(3):e12843 PMID 29578252
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2002 Mar;38 Suppl 4:S125-33 PMID 11858978
Cites: Stud Health Technol Inform. 2008;136:39-44 PMID 18487705
Cites: Clin Lung Cancer. 2017 Sep;18(5):497-503 PMID 28412094
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2016 Aug;24(8):3261-4 PMID 27052305
Cites: Palliat Med. 2011 Mar;25(2):101-10 PMID 20937613
Cites: Cancer. 2005 Apr 15;103(8):1747-55 PMID 15756655
Cites: Dan Med J. 2015 Apr;62(4):A5033 PMID 25872548
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2013 Oct;22(8):1889-905 PMID 23288613
Cites: Health Policy. 2011 Dec;103(2-3):297-304 PMID 21183240
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2006 May;14(5):444-53 PMID 16402231
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2011;11(3):1733 PMID 21787109
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2009 Jun 20;27(18):3052-8 PMID 19451437
Cites: Cancer. 2002 Jan 15;94(2):512-20 PMID 11900236
PubMed ID
29578252 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of health-related quality of life and symptoms in patients with advanced cancer in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295606
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2018 May; 27(3):e12843
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
May-2018
Author
M Augustussen
M L Pedersen
L Hounsgaard
H Timm
P Sjøgren
Author Affiliation
Institute of Nursing and Health Science, Ilisimatusarfik, University of Greenland, Nuuk, Greenland.
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2018 May; 27(3):e12843
Date
May-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Greenland
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Palliative Care
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Social Adjustment
Young Adult
Abstract
A prospective national cohort study assessed the development of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and symptoms in adult patients undergoing treatment and care for advanced cancer in Greenland. HRQol was examined by EORTC QLQ-C30 version 3.0 questionnaire monthly for 4 months. Changes over time and between-group comparisons were examined. Of 58 patients included in the study, 47% completed the questionnaire four times. Functioning was generally high, and improved social functioning was observed after 1 and 2 months. The highest symptom score was for fatigue followed by pain and nausea/vomiting. A high score for financial problems remained unchanged during the entire period. Patients with higher income had reduced pain intensity (p = .03) and diarrhoea (p = .05) than patients with income below the poverty line. After 1 month, reduction in pain intensity was observed for Nuuk citizens compared with non-Nuuk citizens (p = .05). After 2 months, non-Nuuk citizens reported improved social functioning compared with Nuuk citizens (p = .05). After 3 months, Global Health in Nuuk citizens was improved compared with non-Nuuk citizens (p = .05). An important clinical finding was that patients' needs for support are related to social status, and geographical factors should be taken into account when planning palliative care.
Notes
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2002 Apr;38(6):788-94 PMID 11937313
Cites: J Telemed Telecare. 2007;13(2):74-8 PMID 17359570
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2012 Sep;20(9):2097-103 PMID 22076621
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2006 Mar;31(3):199-206 PMID 16563314
Cites: Palliat Med. 2009 Jul;23(5):432-40 PMID 19304808
Cites: Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2017 Jun;28:92-97 PMID 28478862
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2011 Jan 31;11:20 PMID 21281470
Cites: J Rural Health. 2006 Spring;22(2):174-81 PMID 16606431
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2016 Nov;68:73-81 PMID 27721057
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2011;11(3):1784 PMID 21848359
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2014 May;23(4):1387-94 PMID 24178630
Cites: Qual Life Res. 1996 Dec;5(6):555-67 PMID 8993101
Cites: Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2018 May;27(3):e12843 PMID 29578252
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2002 Mar;38 Suppl 4:S125-33 PMID 11858978
Cites: Stud Health Technol Inform. 2008;136:39-44 PMID 18487705
Cites: Clin Lung Cancer. 2017 Sep;18(5):497-503 PMID 28412094
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2016 Aug;24(8):3261-4 PMID 27052305
Cites: Palliat Med. 2011 Mar;25(2):101-10 PMID 20937613
Cites: Cancer. 2005 Apr 15;103(8):1747-55 PMID 15756655
Cites: Dan Med J. 2015 Apr;62(4):A5033 PMID 25872548
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2013 Oct;22(8):1889-905 PMID 23288613
Cites: Health Policy. 2011 Dec;103(2-3):297-304 PMID 21183240
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2006 May;14(5):444-53 PMID 16402231
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2011;11(3):1733 PMID 21787109
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2009 Jun 20;27(18):3052-8 PMID 19451437
Cites: Cancer. 2002 Jan 15;94(2):512-20 PMID 11900236
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan 12;75:29787 PMID 26765259
PubMed ID
29578252 View in PubMed
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Excess protein intake relative to fiber and cardiovascular events in elderly men with chronic kidney disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284984
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Jul;26(7):597-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
H. Xu
M. Rossi
K L Campbell
G L Sencion
J. Ärnlöv
T. Cederholm
P. Sjögren
U. Risérus
B. Lindholm
J J Carrero
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Jul;26(7):597-602
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biomarkers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Diet Records
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Feeding Behavior
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Protective factors
Recommended dietary allowances
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The elevated cardiovascular (CVD) risk observed in chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be partially alleviated through diet. While protein intake may link to CVD events in this patient population, dietary fiber has shown cardioprotective associations. Nutrients are not consumed in isolation; we hypothesize that CVD events in CKD may be associated with dietary patterns aligned with an excess of dietary protein relative to fiber.
Prospective cohort study from the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men. Included were 390 elderly men aged 70-71 years with CKD and without clinical history of CVD. Protein and fiber intake, as well as its ratio, were calculated from 7-day dietary records. Cardiovascular events were registered prospectively during a median follow-up of 9.1 (inter-quartile range, 4.5-10.7) years. The median dietary intake of protein and fiber was 66.7 (60.7-71.1) and 16.6 (14.5-19.1) g/day respectively and the protein-to-fiber intake ratio was 4.0 (3.5-4.7). Protein-to-fiber intake ratio was directly associated with serum C-reactive protein levels. During follow-up, 164 first-time CVD events occurred (incidence rate 54.5/1000 per year). Protein-fiber intake ratio was an independent risk factor for CVD events [adjusted hazard ratio, HR per standard deviation increase (95% confidence interval, CI) 1.33 (1.08, 1.64)]. Although in opposing directions, dietary protein [1.18 (0.97, 1.44)], dietary fiber alone [0.81 (0.64, 1.02)], were not significantly associated with CVD events.
An excess of dietary protein relative to fiber intake was associated with the incidence of cardiovascular events in a homogeneous population of older men with CKD.
PubMed ID
27089977 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.