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The 1 alpha-hydroxylase locus is not linked to calcium stone formation or calciuric phenotypes in French-Canadian families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206213
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 1998 Mar;9(3):425-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
P. Scott
D. Ouimet
Y. Proulx
M L Trouvé
G. Guay
B. Gagnon
L. Valiquette
A. Bonnardeaux
Author Affiliation
Service de Néphrologie, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 1998 Mar;9(3):425-32
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 1-alpha-Hydroxylase - genetics - metabolism
Adult
Calcium - urine
Canada
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Family Health
Female
France - ethnology
Genetic Linkage
Genetic Markers - genetics
Humans
Kidney Calculi - enzymology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Nuclear Family
Pedigree
Phenotype
Vitamin D - blood
Abstract
Calcium urolithiasis is often associated with increased intestinal absorption and urine excretion of calcium, and has been suggested to result from increased vitamin D production. The role of the enzyme 1 alpha-hydroxylase, the rate-limiting step in active vitamin D production, was evaluated in 36 families, including 28 sibships with at least a pair of affected sibs, using qualitative and quantitative trait linkage analyses. Sibs with a verified calcium urolithiasis passage (n = 117) had higher 24-h calciuria (P = 0.03), oxaluria (P = 0.02), fasting and postcalcium loading urine calcium/creatinine (Ca/cr) ratios (P = 0.008 and P = 0.002, respectively), and serum 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D levels (P = 0.02) compared with nonstone-forming sibs (n = 120). Markers from a 9-centiMorgan interval encompassing the VDD1 locus on chromosome 12q13-14 (putative 1 alpha-hydroxylase) were analyzed in 28 sibships (146 sib pairs) of single and recurrent stone formers and in 14 sibships (65 sib pairs) with recurrent-only (> or = 3 episodes) stone-forming sibs. Two-point and multipoint analyses did not reveal excess in alleles shared among affected sibs at the VDD1 locus. Linkage of stone formation to the VDD1 locus could be excluded, respectively, with a lambda d of 2.0 (single and recurrent stone formers) and 3.25 (recurrent stone formers). Quantitative trait analyses revealed no evidence for linkage to 24-h calciuria and oxaluria, serum 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D levels, and Ca/cr ratios. This study shows absence of linkage of the putative 1 alpha-hydroxylase locus to calcium stone formation or to quantitative traits associated with idiopathic hypercalciuria. In addition, there is coaggregation of calciuric and oxaluric phenotypes with stone formation.
PubMed ID
9513904 View in PubMed
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Impact of a very low-energy diet on the fecal microbiota of obese individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262210
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2014 Sep;53(6):1421-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
C D Simões
J. Maukonen
K P Scott
K A Virtanen
K H Pietiläinen
M. Saarela
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2014 Sep;53(6):1421-9
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Body Weight
Caloric Restriction
Colony Count, Microbial
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis
Energy intake
European Continental Ancestry Group
Exercise
Feces - microbiology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Intervention Studies
Life Style
Male
Microbiota
Obesity - diet therapy - microbiology
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Abstract
Study how the dietary intake affects the fecal microbiota of a group of obese individuals after a 6-week very low-energy diet (VLED) and thereafter during a follow-up period of 5, 8, and 12 months. Additionally, we compared two different methods, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and real-time PCR (qPCR), for the quantification of fecal samples.
Sixteen subjects participated in a 12-month dietary intervention which consisted of a VLED high in protein and low in carbohydrates followed by a personalized diet plan, combined with exercise and lifestyle counseling. Fecal samples were analyzed using qPCR, FISH, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.
The VLED affected the fecal microbiota, in particular bifidobacteria that decreased approximately two logs compared with the baseline numbers. The change in numbers of the bacterial groups studied followed the dietary intake and not the weight variations during the 12-month intervention. Methanogens were detected in 56% of the participants at every sampling point, regardless of the dietary intake. Moreover, although absolute numbers of comparable bacterial groups were similar between FISH and qPCR measurements, relative proportions were higher according to FISH results.
Changes in the fecal microbial numbers of obese individuals were primarily affected by the dietary intake rather than weight changes.
PubMed ID
24378982 View in PubMed
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