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250 microg or 500 microg interferon beta-1b versus 20 mg glatiramer acetate in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a prospective, randomised, multicentre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148735
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2009 Oct;8(10):889-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Paul O'Connor
Massimo Filippi
Barry Arnason
Giancarlo Comi
Stuart Cook
Douglas Goodin
Hans-Peter Hartung
Douglas Jeffery
Ludwig Kappos
Francis Boateng
Vitali Filippov
Maria Groth
Volker Knappertz
Christian Kraus
Rupert Sandbrink
Christoph Pohl
Timon Bogumil
P. O'Connor
M. Filippi
B. Arnason
S. Cook
D. Goodin
H-P Hartung
H-P Harung
L. Kappos
D. Jeffery
G. Comi
Author Affiliation
St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada. oconnorp@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2009 Oct;8(10):889-97
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain - drug effects - pathology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Immunologic Factors - therapeutic use
Interferon-beta - administration & dosage
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting - drug therapy - pathology
Peptides - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the Betaferon Efficacy Yielding Outcomes of a New Dose (BEYOND) trial was to compare the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of 250 microg or 500 microg interferon beta-1b with glatiramer acetate for treating relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.
Between November, 2003, and June, 2005, 2447 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis were screened and 2244 patients were enrolled in this prospective, multicentre, randomised trial. Patients were randomly assigned 2:2:1 by block randomisation with regional stratification to receive one of two doses of interferon beta-1b (250 microg or 500 microg) subcutaneously every other day or 20 mg glatiramer acetate subcutaneously every day. The primary outcome was relapse risk, defined as new or recurrent neurological symptoms separated by at least 30 days from the preceding event and that lasted at least 24 h. Secondary outcomes were progression on the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and change in T1-hypointense lesion volume. Clinical outcomes were assessed quarterly for 2.0-3.5 years; MRI was done at screening and annually thereafter. Analysis was by per protocol. This study is registered, number NCT00099502.
We found no differences in relapse risk, EDSS progression, T1-hypointense lesion volume, or normalised brain volume among treatment groups. Flu-like symptoms were more common in patients treated with interferon beta-1b (p
Notes
Comment In: Lancet Neurol. 2009 Dec;8(12):1085-6; author reply 1086-719909906
Comment In: Lancet Neurol. 2009 Oct;8(10):870-119729345
Erratum In: Lancet Neurol. 2012 Jan;11(1):27Cree, B [added]; Harung, H-P [corrected to Hartung, H-P]
Erratum In: Lancet Neurol. 2009 Nov;8(11):981
Erratum In: Lancet Neurol. 2011 Feb;10(2):115
PubMed ID
19729344 View in PubMed
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Access to multiple sclerosis diagnosis for Canadian neurologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201931
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1999 May;26(2):115-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
P. O'Connor
L. Lee
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurology, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1999 May;26(2):115-8
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - utilization
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - diagnosis
Neurology - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
Access to multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis in Canada has never been assessed. This study was designed to examine the pattern of MS diagnosis in Canada, including neurologists' diagnostic approach and waiting times for investigations.
A mail survey was forwarded to every registered neurologist in Canada (n = 479) in late 1996. Questions included their diagnostic approach to MS including perceived waiting times for various investigations including MRI. Actual MRI waiting periods were separately obtained from booking clerks or neuroradiologists from every MRI unit in Canada.
153 responses were received. Neurological assessment is obtained, on average, 1 month after referral. MRI is routinely ordered by 92% of neurologists for suspected MS followed by evoked potentials (EP) (36%) and lumbar puncture (LP) (17%). The perceived waiting period for EP and LP is less than one month but 3 months for MRI. This is very similar to the actual waiting periods obtained from the MRI units surveyed (mean of 101 days). There is a trend for longer waiting periods as one moved east to west (Eastern provinces--mean of 62 days, Ontario--95 days, Quebec--102 days and 122 days in the Western provinces). Private MRI units have appeared in the Western provinces and have the shortest waiting periods (2 weeks maximum). The current MRI/million population ratio in Canada is 1.8, far below the ratios of other developed nations.
Canadian neurologists prefer MRI of the brain to confirm an MS diagnosis and desire greater access to it. Access to neurological assessment, EP and LP is probably adequate but the average wait for MRI of 3 months is relatively long. The perceived average waiting period for MRI is similar to the actual waiting times of 3 months, with the Western provinces of Canada having the longest waits. Canada continues to have one of the lowest MRI/population ratios in the developed world.
PubMed ID
10352870 View in PubMed
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Age at onset of multiple sclerosis may be influenced by place of residence during childhood rather than ancestry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170585
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2006;26(3):162-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
J. Kennedy
P. O'Connor
A D Sadovnick
M. Perara
I. Yee
B. Banwell
Author Affiliation
The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. L5M 4A7, Canada.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2006;26(3):162-7
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Asia - ethnology
Caribbean Region - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Emigration and Immigration
Europe - ethnology
Humans
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Abstract
Multiple sclerosis (MS) most commonly affects individuals of Northern European descent who live in countries at high latitude. The relative contributions of ancestry, country of birth and residence as determinants of MS risk have been studied in adult MS, but have not been explored in the pediatric MS population. In this study, we compare the demographics of pediatric- and adult-onset MS patients cared for in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, a multicultural region. The country of birth, residence during childhood, and ancestry were compared for 44 children and 573 adults. Our results demonstrate that although both the pediatric and adult cohorts were essentially born and raised in the same region of Ontario, Canada, children with MS were more likely to report Caribbean, Asian or Middle Eastern ancestry, and were less likely to have European heritage compared with individuals with adult-onset MS. The difference in ancestry between the pediatric and adult MS cohorts can be explained by two hypotheses: (1) individuals raised in a region of high MS prevalence, but whose ancestors originate from regions in which MS is rare, have an earlier age of MS onset, and (2) the place of residence during childhood, irrespective of ancestry, determines lifetime MS risk -- a fact that will be reflected in a change in the demographics of the adult MS cohort in our region as Canadian-raised children of recent immigrants reach the typical age of adult-onset MS.
PubMed ID
16493204 View in PubMed
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Approaches in treatment planning for the adult patient in North American dental schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103185
Source
J Mich Dent Assoc. 1990 Feb;72(2):79-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990

Baron Larrey and cold injury during the campaigns of Napoleon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215409
Source
Ann Plast Surg. 1995 Apr;34(4):446-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
S T O'Sullivan
M. O'Shaughnessy
T P O'Connor
Author Affiliation
University Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cork Regional Hospital, Wilton, Ireland.
Source
Ann Plast Surg. 1995 Apr;34(4):446-9
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Austria
Foot Injuries
France
Frostbite
General Surgery
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
Humans
Military Medicine
Russia
War
PubMed ID
7793796 View in PubMed
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Cognitive behaviour therapy and medication in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169872
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2006 May;113(5):408-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
K P O'Connor
F. Aardema
S. Robillard
S. Guay
M-C Pélissier
C. Todorov
F. Borgeat
V. Leblanc
S. Grenier
P. Doucet
Author Affiliation
Fernand-Seguin Research Centre, Louis-H. Lafontaine Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada. kieron.oconnor@umontreal.ca
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2006 May;113(5):408-19
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Cognition - drug effects
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Combined Modality Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - drug therapy - psychology - therapy
Placebos - administration & dosage
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) with CBT plus medication; medication alone; and placebo in the treatment of adult obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).
Forty-eight participants (43 completers) were recruited into two protocols. In the first protocol, 21 people with OCD were randomly allocated to either a standard medication (fluvoxamine) or standard placebo condition for a 5-month period. Both these groups subsequently received CBT for a further 5 months. In the second protocol, 22 people with OCD received CBT, one group was already stabilized on an antidepressant of choice; the second group was drug naïve.
All active treatments, but not the placebo, showed clinical improvement. There was no difference in treatment response to CBT regardless of whether participants had previously received medication or placebo.
CBT has a more specific antiobsessional effect than medication but CBT plus medication shows greatest overall clinical improvement in mood.
PubMed ID
16603032 View in PubMed
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Cost analysis of methylprednisolone treatment of multiple sclerosis patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204810
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1998 Aug;25(3):222-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
L S Robson
C. Bain
S. Beck
S. Guthrie
P C Coyte
P. O'Connor
Author Affiliation
Institute for Work and Health, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1998 Aug;25(3):222-9
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - economics
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Fees, Medical
Home Care Services - economics
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Methylprednisolone - economics - therapeutic use
Multiple Sclerosis - drug therapy - economics
Abstract
Intravenous methylprednisolone (IVMP) is the treatment of choice for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients undergoing acute exacerbation of disease symptoms and yet its cost has not been accurately determined. Determination of this cost in different settings is also pertinent to consideration of cost-saving alternatives to in-patient treatment.
Cost analysis from the point of view of the health care system of IVMP treatment of MS patients receiving treatment in association with a selected Toronto teaching hospital in fiscal year 1994/95 was carried out. Costs of any concurrent treatments were excluded.
Total cost for 92 patients, based on a 4 dose regime, was estimated to be $78,527. The the cost per patient was $1,1181.84 for in-patients (IP), $714.64 for out-patients of the MS Clinic (OP) and $774.21 for patients whose treatment was initiated in the Clinic, but completed in the home (HC). Sensitivity analyses indicated: 1) IP treatment was in all cases more expensive than that of OP or HC; 2) the cost savings of OP vs. HC was sensitive to assumptions made regarding Clinic overhead, Clinic nursing costs and Home Care Program overhead.
Alternatives to in-patient care must be considered carefully. In this study, both out-patient and in-home treatment were cost-saving alternatives to in-patient treatment, but large differences in the cost of hospital out-patient vs. in-home care could not be demonstrated.
PubMed ID
9706724 View in PubMed
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Deductive and inductive reasoning in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190717
Source
Br J Clin Psychol. 2002 Mar;41(Pt 1):15-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Marie-Claude Pélissier
Kieron P O'Connor
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche Fernand-Seguin, 7331 Hochelaga, Montréal, Québec, H1N 3V2, Canada. mcpelissier@crfs.umontreal.ca
Source
Br J Clin Psychol. 2002 Mar;41(Pt 1):15-27
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Female
Humans
Logic
Male
Middle Aged
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - psychology
Probability
Quebec
Thinking
Abstract
This study tested the hypothesis that people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) show an inductive reasoning style distinct from people with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and from participants in a non-anxious (NA) control group.
The experimental procedure consisted of administering a range of six deductive and inductive tasks and a probabilistic task in order to compare reasoning processes between groups.
Recruitment was in the Montreal area within a French-speaking population. The participants were 12 people with OCD, 12 NA controls and 10 people with GAD. Participants completed a series of written and oral reasoning tasks including the Wason Selection Task, a Bayesian probability task and other inductive tasks, designed by the authors.
There were no differences between groups in deductive reasoning. On an inductive "bridging task", the participants with OCD always took longer than the NA control and GAD groups to infer a link between two statements and to elaborate on this possible link. The OCD group alone showed a significant decrease in their degree of conviction about an arbitrary statement after inductively generating reasons to support this statement. Differences in probabilistic reasoning replicated those of previous authors.
The results pinpoint the importance of examining inference processes in people with OCD in order to further refine the clinical applications of behavioural-cognitive therapy for this disorder.
PubMed ID
11931675 View in PubMed
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Farm-level risk factors for the presence of Salmonella in 89 Alberta swine-finishing barns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160662
Source
Can J Vet Res. 2007 Oct;71(4):264-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Andrijana Rajic
Brendan P O'Connor
Anne E Deckert
Julia Keenliside
Margaret E McFall
Richard J Reid-Smith
Catherine E Dewey
Scott A McEwen
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1. andrijana_rajic@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Can J Vet Res. 2007 Oct;71(4):264-70
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Animal Feed
Animal Husbandry - methods
Animals
Humans
Hygiene
Multivariate Analysis
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Salmonella Infections, Animal - epidemiology - etiology - transmission
Sentinel Surveillance - veterinary
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - transmission
Abstract
This study investigated potential risk factors for the presence of Salmonella on 89 Alberta swine-finishing farms with the use of a questionnaire. Salmonella status was regressed on each fixed effect in a logistic mixed regression model, with farm as the random effect. Eleven variables were significant at the 10% level: farm type, number of square feet per pen, number of pigs per pen, source of feed, ration type, dust control measures, cat presence, reported effective mouse-control measures, time required to be away from pigs before visiting the farm, precautions taken when entering or leaving the farm, and reported use of antimicrobials through water. Three factors remained significant at the 5% level in the multivariable analysis: farm type, ration type, and precautions taken when entering or leaving the farm. Finishing barns at multisite operations or individual grow-to-finish farms had a greater risk of the presence of Salmonella at a single visit than did finishing barns at farrow-to-finish farms. The use of pelleted and wet feed was associated with higher odds of the presence of Salmonella than was the use of meal feed. Farms that required their personnel or visitors to shower before entering and before leaving had increased odds of the presence of Salmonella compared with farms that provided boots and coveralls; no significant difference was observed between the latter category and farms that used boot disinfection. Further work is necessary to better understand the effectiveness of all-in/all-out pig management and disinfection practices in reducing the presence of Salmonella in swine and to evaluate the association with certain types of feed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17955900 View in PubMed
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Genetic susceptibility to MS: a second stage analysis in Canadian MS families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193481
Source
Neurogenetics. 2001 Jul;3(3):145-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
D A Dyment
C J Willer
B. Scott
H. Armstrong
A. Ligers
J. Hillert
D W Paty
S. Hashimoto
V. Devonshire
J. Hooge
L. Kastrukoff
J. Oger
L. Metz
S. Warren
W. Hader
C. Power
A. Auty
A. Nath
R. Nelson
M. Freedman
D. Brunet
J E Paulseth
G. Rice
P. O'Connor
P. Duquette
Y. Lapierre
G. Francis
J P Bouchard
T J Murray
V. Bhan
C. Maxner
W. Pryse-Phillips
M. Stefanelli
A D Sadovnick
N. Risch
G C Ebers
Author Affiliation
The Wellcome Trust Center for Human Genetics, Oxford, UK.
Source
Neurogenetics. 2001 Jul;3(3):145-51
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Family
Female
Genetic Linkage
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome, Human
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
HLA-DRB1 Chains
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - genetics
Nuclear Family
Software
Abstract
Four published genome screens have identified a number of markers with increased sharing in multiple sclerosis (MS) families, although none has reached statistical significance. One hundred and five markers previously identified as showing increased sharing in Canadian, British, Finnish, and American genome screens were genotyped in 219 sibling pairs ascertained from the database of the Canadian Collaborative Project on Genetic Susceptibility to MS (CCPGSMS). No markers examined met criteria for significant linkage. Markers located at 5p14 and 17q22 were analyzed in a total of 333 sibling pairs and attained mlod scores of 2.27 and 1.14, respectively. The known HLA Class II DRB1 association with MS was confirmed (P
PubMed ID
11523565 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.