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63 records – page 1 of 7.

The ABC Schizophrenia Study: a preliminary overview of the results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10833
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Aug;33(8):380-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
H. Häfner
K. Maurer
W. Löffler
W. an der Heiden
P. Munk-Jørgensen
M. Hambrecht
A. Riecher-Rössler
Author Affiliation
Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Aug;33(8):380-6
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Schizophrenia - etiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Sex Factors
Abstract
The ABC Schizophrenia Study, a large-scale epidemiological and neurobiological research project commenced in 1987, initially pursued two aims: (1) to elucidate the possible causes of the sex difference in age at first admission for schizophrenia and (2) to analyse the early course of the disorder from onset until first contact and its implications for further course and outcome. First, transnational case-register data (for Denmark and Germany) were compared, second, a population-based sample of first-episode cases of schizophrenia (n = 232) were selected and third, the results obtained were compared with data from the WHO Determinants of Outcome Study by using a systematic methodology. A consistent result was a 3-4 years higher age of onset for women by any definition of onset, which was not explainable by social variables, such as differences in the male-female societal roles. A sensitivity-reducing effect of oestrogen on central D2 receptors was identified as the underlying neurobiological mechanism in animal experiments. Applicability to humans with schizophrenia was established in a controlled clinical study. A comparison of familial and sporadic cases showed that in cases with a high genetic load, the sex difference in age of onset disappeared due to a clearly reduced age of onset in women, whereas in sporadic cases it increased. To analyse early course retrospectively, a semistructured interview, IRAOS, was developed. The early stages of the disorder were reconstructed in comparison with age- and sex-matched controls from the same population of origin. The initial signs consisted mainly of negative and affective symptoms, which accumulated exponentially until the first episode, as did the later emerging positive symptoms. Social disability appeared 2-4 years before first admission on average. In early-onset cases, social course and outcome, studied prospectively over 5 years, was determined by the level of social development at onset through social stagnation. In late-onset cases, decline from initially high social statuses occurred. Socially negative illness behaviour contributed to the poor social outcome of young men. Symptomatology and other proxy variables of the disorder showed stable courses and no sex differences. Further aspects tested were the sequence of onset and the influence of substance abuse on the course of schizophrenia, primary and secondary negative symptoms, structural models and symptom clusters from onset until 5 years after first admission.
PubMed ID
9708025 View in PubMed
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Affective disorders among Greenlandic psychiatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46217
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Dec;100(6):424-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
I. Lynge
P. Munk-Jørgensen
P B Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Basic Psychiatric Research, Department of Psychiatric Demography, Psychiatric Hospital in Arhus, Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Dec;100(6):424-32
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Sex Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the treatment incidence, diagnostic stability and clinical and social outcome of affective disorders in the Greenlandic population. METHODS: A cohort of Greenlanders first hospitalized in 1980-1983 and diagnosed with an affective disorder at least once during the period 7 to 12 years after first admission formed the study population. The manic-depressive patients who were still alive at follow-up were invited for a Present State Examination, and information about clinical and social condition was obtained for the total cohort. RESULTS: The rates of manic-depressive psychoses diagnosed at first admission or later were 6.6 for men and 20.4 for women per 100,000 individuals of over 15 years of age. The unipolar:bipolar ratio was very low, namely 1:3 for men and 1:2 for women. Outcome was relatively poor. CONCLUSION: Manic-depression is a recognizable diagnostic category in Greenland. Extremely low rates of unipolar disorders in both sexes and high rates of bipolar disorders among women were the most marked findings.
PubMed ID
10626920 View in PubMed
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Alcoholics in psychiatric institutions. A nationwide Danish follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237820
Source
Soc Psychiatry. 1986;21(3):146-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986

[Alcoholism and mortality. Mortality among clients attending a clinic for alcoholics for the first time in 1972 and 1982 in Aarhus].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235126
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Jun 1;149(23):1559-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1987
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Feb;12(2):173-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
L. Mellemkjaer
C. Emborg
G. Gridley
P. Munk-Jørgensen
C. Johansen
A. Tjønneland
S K Kjaer
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen. lene@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Feb;12(2):173-7
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Anorexia Nervosa - diagnosis - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Poisson Distribution
Reference Values
Registries
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Energy restriction reduces the incidence of malignant tumors in experimental animals, but evidence for a similar effect in humans is lacking. To test the hypothesis in humans, we investigated cancer incidence among patients with anorexia nervosa, who have had an extremely low intake of calories for prolonged periods of their lives. METHODS: Patients with anorexia nervosa (2151 women and 186 men) during 1970-1993 were identified in the population-based Danish Psychiatric Case Register and the National Registry of Patients. The cohort was linked to the Danish Cancer Registry, and cancer incidence among cohort members was compared with that of the general population. RESULTS: The overall cancer incidence among women with anorexia nervosa was reduced by a factor of 0.80 (95% confidence interval 0.52-1.18) below that of the general population on the basis of 25 observed and 31.4 expected cases. Among men, two cases of cancer were observed, both confined to the brain, whereas 0.2 cases were expected. CONCLUSIONS: The finding of a slight reduction in cancer risk among women with anorexia nervosa may support the theory that a low-energy diet may decrease tumor development in humans. However, longer follow-up and control for confounding factors are needed to obtain more convincing evidence.
PubMed ID
11246846 View in PubMed
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Changes in utilization of Danish psychiatric institutions. I. An outline of the period 1957-1982.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74108
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 1986 Sep-Oct;27(5):407-15
Publication Type
Article

A comparative census study of Danish schizophrenic patients in 1977 and 1982.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237680
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Neurol Sci. 1986;235(5):323-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
E. Jordá-Moscardó
P. Munk-Jørgensen
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Neurol Sci. 1986;235(5):323-7
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Female
Humans
Institutionalization
Male
Middle Aged
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Abstract
The present register-based investigation includes all hospitalized schizophrenic patients in Denmark on census days in September 1977 and September 1982. In 1977 the rates were 107.8 and 88.1 per 100,000 inhabitants aged 15 years or more for males and females, respectively, and correspondingly 99.2 and 71.5 in 1982. The prevalence rates of first admitted on the census days had decreased slightly in the older age groups from 1977 to 1982 but were unchanged in the age groups 15-44 years. The long-stay groups were smaller but at the same time the rates of re-admitted younger males had increased. Only a few changes between the distribution of the two groups' marital status occurred and there was still a considerable excess of single and divorced among the schizophrenic patients. More patients were in day-patient care and in nursing homes and fewer were admitted as in-patients, although in 1982 56% of the males and 52% of the females were in the latter type of care. The percentage of committed patients decreased from 12.6 to 9.1 for the males and from 8.9 to 7.0 for the females. This decrease was most pronounced in the group of patients admitted because of dangerous behaviour. The results are discussed especially in relation to reductions in available beds in psychiatric institutions.
PubMed ID
3732344 View in PubMed
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Comparison of psychiatric ICD-10 diagnoses in Denmark and Germany.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9979
Source
Psychopathology. 2002 Jan-Feb;35(1):36-47
Publication Type
Article
Author
W. Lange
P. Munk-Jørgensen
A. Bertelsen
A. Schürmann
R. Michels
C P Malchow
H. Dilling
Author Affiliation
WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Lübeck, Germany.
Source
Psychopathology. 2002 Jan-Feb;35(1):36-47
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Schizophrenia, Paranoid - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
A dataset of psychiatric ICD-10 diagnoses from the Danish case register concerning psychiatric hospitals was compared with a sample of psychiatric diagnoses from 27 psychiatric hospitals in Germany. The comparison shows a higher proportion of F1 diagnoses in the German dataset and a difference in the coding of alcohol dependence and harmful use. Some further differences in the groups F0-F6 are demonstrated and some of them are discussed. The most frequent diagnoses found in both datasets but in different sequence are alcohol dependence syndrome and paranoid schizophrenia and, in third place, adjustment disorder. Various aspects of the problem of rarely used diagnoses are discussed.
PubMed ID
12006747 View in PubMed
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63 records – page 1 of 7.