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Agroenvironmental determinants associated with the presence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli in beach waters in Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132370
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2011 Sep;58(6):432-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
P. Turgeon
P. Michel
P. Levallois
P. Chevalier
D. Daignault
B. Crago
R. Irwin
S A McEwen
N F Neumann
M. Louie
Author Affiliation
Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire, Université de Montréal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada. patricia.turgeon@umontreal.ca
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2011 Sep;58(6):432-9
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Animals
Bathing Beaches
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Human Activities
Humans
Lakes - microbiology
Logistic Models
Quebec
Seasons
Time Factors
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Exposure to microorganisms resistant to antimicrobials may constitute a health risk to human populations. It is believed that one route of exposure occurs when people engage in recreational activities in water contaminated with these microorganisms. The main objective of this study was to explore population-level and environmental determinants specifically associated with the presence of antimicrobial resistant (AMR) generic Escherichia coli isolated from recreational waters sampled from beaches located in southern Quebec, Canada. Water samples originated from the Quebec provincial beach surveillance program for the summers of 2004 and 2005. This study focused on three classes of determinants, namely: agricultural, population-level and beach characteristics for a total of 19 specific factors. The study was designed as a retrospective observational analysis and factors were assessed using logistic regression methods. From the multivariable analysis, the data suggested that the percentage of land used for spreading liquid manure was a significant factor associated with the presence of AMR E. coli (OR=27.73). Conceptually, broad factors potentially influencing the presence of AMR bacteria in water must be assessed specifically in addition to factors associated with general microbial contamination. Presence of AMR E. coli in recreational waters from beaches in southern Quebec may represent a risk for people engaging in water activities and this study provides preliminary evidence that agricultural practices, specifically spreading liquid manure in agricultural lands nearby beaches, may be linked to the contamination of these waters by AMR E. coli.
PubMed ID
21824340 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 1995 Feb 15;152(4):467-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1995
Author
P. Levallois
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Feb 15;152(4):467-8
Date
Feb-15-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - adverse effects
Alzheimer Disease - chemically induced
Canada
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Water Supply - standards
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 1991 Oct 1;145(7):793-8041822096
Cites: CMAJ. 1994 Jan 1;150(1):68-97903905
Comment On: CMAJ. 1994 Aug 1;151(3):268-718039073
Erratum In: Can Med Assoc J 1995 Jun 1;152(11):1751
PubMed ID
7859190 View in PubMed
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Association between indicators of livestock farming intensity and hospitalization rate for acute gastroenteritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152402
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2009 Aug;137(8):1073-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Y. Febriani
P. Levallois
G. Lebel
S. Gingras
Author Affiliation
Unité de recherche en santé publique du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Quebec, QC, Canada.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2009 Aug;137(8):1073-85
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animal Husbandry - statistics & numerical data
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Population Density
Quebec - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Water supply
Young Adult
Zoonoses - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate associations between indicators of livestock farming intensity (manure surplus and livestock density) and acute gastroenteritis hospitalization (AGH) rate, we conducted an ecological study on 306 selected agricultural municipalities of Quebec. We estimated the AGH rate for the period 2000-2004 from the Quebec hospital database. Multivariate Poisson regression was used to estimate the strength of association between the farming indicators and AGH with adjustment for confounders. The modifying effect of age and water source was also evaluated. Association between manure and AGH was observed in children, especially those aged 0-4 years for selected zoonotic infections [adjusted hospitalization rate ratio (aHRR) 1.93, 95% CI 1.21-3.09]. The risk ratio was higher for subjects using ground-water source. An increasing HRR trend with each additional level of poultry density was observed in children aged 0-4 years, especially for Salmonella infections. We conclude that livestock farming intensity may be linked to bacterial acute gastroenteritis in children.
PubMed ID
19243650 View in PubMed
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Association between potential zoonotic enteric infections in children and environmental risk factors in Quebec, 1999-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143030
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2010 Dec;57(7-8):e195-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
H. Kaboré
P. Levallois
P. Michel
P. Payment
P. Déry
S. Gingras
Author Affiliation
Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Québec, QC, Canada.
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2010 Dec;57(7-8):e195-205
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry - statistics & numerical data
Animals
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology
Cattle
Child, Preschool
Environmental pollution
Female
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology - parasitology
Giardiasis - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Livestock
Logistic Models
Male
Population Surveillance
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Rural Population
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology
Water Supply - standards
Zoonoses - epidemiology
Abstract
This study was designed to evaluate the association of potential zoonotic gastroenteritis in children, and specifically giardiasis, salmonellosis and campylobacteriosis, with environmental risk factors in rural areas of Quebec. Notified cases of gastroenteritis in children of 0-4 years of age reported in the period of 1999 through 2006 from municipalities in southern Quebec with
PubMed ID
20529210 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 1993 Dec 15;149(12):1776-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1993
Author
P. Levallois
M. Rhainds
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Dec 15;149(12):1776-7
Date
Dec-15-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Welfare
Humans
Lead Poisoning - blood - epidemiology - therapy
Primary prevention - methods
United States - epidemiology
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1990 Oct;80(10):1240-52136329
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1982 Feb 11;306(6):3677054715
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Apr 7;269(13):1647-548455298
Comment On: CMAJ. 1993 Feb 15;148(4):517-98381702
PubMed ID
8261343 View in PubMed
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Blood lead levels in children and pregnant women living near a lead-reclamation plant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226597
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Apr 1;144(7):877-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1991
Author
P. Levallois
M. Lavoie
L. Goulet
A J Nantel
S. Gingras
Author Affiliation
Centre de toxicologie du Québec, Sainte-Foy.
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Apr 1;144(7):877-85
Date
Apr-1-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Chemical Industry
Child
Child, Preschool
Dust - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Humans
Infant
Lead - analysis - blood
Lead Poisoning - blood - epidemiology
Male
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Soil - analysis
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Abstract
To determine the effect of lead contamination around a lead-reclamation plant on the blood lead levels of children and pregnant women living in the area.
Prevalence study.
Residents living 150 m or less (high-exposure area), 151 to 400 m (intermediate-exposure area) or 401 to 800 m (low-exposure area) southeast from the plant.
All children aged 10 years or less and all pregnant women living in the designated area.
Correlation of venous blood lead levels with soil lead concentrations in the areas in which the subjects lived and with sociodemographic and behavioural factors.
Of the estimated 57 pregnant women 38 (67%) participated: 20 were in the high-exposure area and 18 in the other two areas; their geometric mean blood lead levels were low (0.15 and 0.13 mumol/L respectively). Of the 625 eligible children 510 (82%) participated: 169 were in the high-exposure area, 179 in the intermediate-exposure area and 162 in the low-exposure area; their geometric mean lead levels were 0.43, 0.30 and 0.26 mumol/L respectively. Within each age group children in the high-exposure area had the highest levels. The mean levels for children aged 6 months to 5 years were 0.49, 0.35 and 0.28 mumol/L in the three areas respectively. Within each exposure group children aged 1 to 2 years had the highest levels. No potential confounding variables could explain the relation between blood lead level and soil lead concentration.
The pregnant women's blood lead levels did not seem to be affected by exposure level, but the children's levels were primarily related to the soil lead concentration.
Notes
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PubMed ID
2007239 View in PubMed
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Chlamydial infection among females attending an abortion clinic: prevalence and risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235015
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Jul 1;137(1):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1987
Author
P. Levallois
J E Rioux
L. Côté
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Jul 1;137(1):33-7
Date
Jul-1-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Cervix Uteri - microbiology
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - isolation & purification
Contraception Behavior
Female
Humans
Quebec
Risk
Sexual Behavior
Urban Population
Abstract
To determine the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection and the epidemiologic risk factors for chlamydial infection in the Quebec City region, screening was done with an enzyme immunoassay in 920 females who attended an abortion clinic between November 1985 and June 1986. The organism was detected in 105 (11.4%) of the patients. After adjustment for confounding variables, four variables were found to be independent risk factors for chlamydial infection: age 24 years or less (prevalence ratio 3.0 [p less than 0.001]), two or more sexual partners during the previous year (prevalence ratio 1.8 [p = 0.001]), no contraception or the use of a nonbarrier method (prevalence ratio 1.9 [p = 0.030]) and living in an urban area (prevalence ratio 1.6 [p = 0.046]). The results confirm that chlamydial infection is prevalent in this population. The identified risk factors may prove useful in determining the target population for screening programs.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1975 Mar 24;231(12):1252-5163932
Cites: JAMA. 1986 Sep 5;256(9):1178-93016356
Cites: Br J Vener Dis. 1979 Dec;55(6):429-33230884
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Jun 1;124(11):1477-96786725
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1982 Feb;59(2):210-37078867
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1982 Sep;60(3):322-57121913
Cites: Br J Vener Dis. 1983 Jun;59(3):189-926850266
Cites: West J Med. 1983 Mar;138(3):375-96858125
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Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1977 May;105(5):488-95871121
PubMed ID
3594332 View in PubMed
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Effects of maternal cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption on blood lead levels of newborns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209482
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Feb 1;145(3):250-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1997
Author
M. Rhainds
P. Levallois
Author Affiliation
Service Santé, Centre Hospitalier universitaire de Québec, Beauport, Canada.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Feb 1;145(3):250-7
Date
Feb-1-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lead - blood
Life Style
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Quebec
Questionnaires
Smoking - adverse effects
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of cigarette smoking (active and passive exposure) and alcohol consumption during pregnancy on cord blood lead levels. In 1990, a survey was conducted in two hospitals in Québec City, Québec, Canada, a white-collar agglomeration. The sample included 430 mothers and their newborns. Information on the lifestyles of mothers during pregnancy was obtained by questionnaire. Cord blood lead concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. A dose-response relation was found between cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption of mothers and cord blood lead levels. An average increase of about 15 percent (0.013 mumol/liter) in cord blood lead levels was estimated for every 10 cigarettes smoked per day. Mean blood lead levels in babies whose mothers did not smoke during pregnancy but who drank alcohol moderately was 17 percent higher than those of nonsmoking mothers who abstained from alcohol intake. Multivariate analyses revealed that both cigarette smoking and alcohol intake make significant and independent contributions to cord blood lead concentrations. Lifestyles of pregnant women thus appear to play an important role in the prenatal lead exposure of newborns. Because of the potential effects of lead exposure on pregnancy outcomes, our study provides further arguments to support public health advisories concerning the harmful effect of smoking and drinking alcohol during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
9012598 View in PubMed
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Electric and magnetic field exposures for people living near a 735-kilovolt power line.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214501
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1995 Sep;103(9):832-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995
Author
P. Levallois
D. Gauvin
J. St-Laurent
S. Gingras
J E Deadman
Author Affiliation
Centre de Santé Publique de Québec, Ste-Foy, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1995 Sep;103(9):832-7
Date
Sep-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Electric Wiring
Electromagnetic fields
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Quebec
Time Factors
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a 735-kV transmission line on the electric and magnetic field exposures of people living at the edge of the line's right of way. Exposure of 18 adults, mostly white-collar workers, living in different bungalows located 190-240 feet from the line (exposed subjects) was compared to that of 17 adults living in similar residences far away from any transmission line. Each subject carried a Positron meter for 24 hr during 1 workday, which measured 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields every minute. All measurements were carried out in parallel for exposed and unexposed subjects during the same weeks between September and December. During measurements the average loading on the line varied between 600 and 1100 A. The average magnetic field intensity while at home was 4.4 times higher among exposed subjects than unexposed (7.1 versus 1.6 mG, p = 0.0001) and 6.2 times higher when considering only the sleeping period (6.8 versus 1.1 mG, p = 0.0001). Based on the 24-hr measurement, average magnetic field exposure was three times higher among the exposed. Electric field intensity was also higher among the exposed while at home (26.3 versus 14.0 V/m, p = 0.03). Magnetic field intensity among the exposed was positively correlated with the loading on the line (r = 0.8, p = 0.001). Percentage of time above a magnetic field threshold (2 mG or 7.8 mG) was a good indicator to distinguish the two types of exposure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
Notes
Cites: Bioelectromagnetics. 1991;12(4):241-571930308
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Erratum In: Environ Health Perspect 1998 Sep;106(9):A422
PubMed ID
7498095 View in PubMed
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Exposure of the Inuit population of Nunavik (Arctic Quebec) to lead and mercury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3471
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;56(4):350-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Dewailly
P. Ayotte
S. Bruneau
G. Lebel
P. Levallois
J P Weber
Author Affiliation
Unité de Recherche en Santé Publique, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Beauport, Canada.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;56(4):350-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Diet - adverse effects
Diet Surveys
Ducks
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Geese
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Lead - blood
Lead Poisoning - blood - ethnology
Life Style
Male
Mercury - blood
Mercury Poisoning - blood - ethnology
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Seafood - analysis
Seals, Earless
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Whales
Abstract
The authors conducted a survey during 1992 to evaluate blood levels of lead and mercury in Inuit adults of Nunavik (Arctic Quebec, Canada). Blood samples obtained from 492 participants (209 males and 283 females; mean age = 35 yr) were analyzed for lead and total mercury; mean (geometric) concentrations were 0.42 micromol/l (range = 0.04-2.28 micromol/l) and 79.6 nmol/l (range = 4-560 nmol/l), respectively. Concentrations of omega-3 fatty acid in plasma phospholipids--a biomarker of marine food consumption--were correlated with mercury (r = .56, p
PubMed ID
11572279 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.