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Cancer incidence among pulp and paper workers exposed to organic chlorinated compounds formed during chlorine pulp bleaching.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225592
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1991 Oct;17(5):356-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1991
Author
P. Jäppinen
E. Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Enso-Gutzeit Oy, Occupational Health Centre, Imatra, Finland.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1991 Oct;17(5):356-9
Date
Oct-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - adverse effects
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Paper
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
The risk of cancer of 152 male workers exposed to organic chlorine compounds formed during chlorine pulp bleaching was assessed in a retrospective cohort study. The men had worked continuously for at least one year in selected job categories between 1 January 1945 and 31 December 1961. The cohort was followed for death and cancer incidence until 31 December 1987 with the use of the data of the National Population Register and the Finnish Cancer Registry. There were 12 observed cancers against 8.1 expected [standardized incidence ratio (SIR) 1.5, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.8-2.6]. Among the stock preparation workers (N = 53), a significantly elevated risk of lung cancer was found (6 observed, 1.0 expected, SIR 6.3, 95% CI 2.3-14) that was especially prominent after a latency (time since first employment) of at least 15 years and in the age group of 35 to 59 years. Although all of the cases involved smokers, a part of the increased incidence may be associated with the workplace exposure to organic chlorinated compounds.
PubMed ID
1947921 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence of workers in a Finnish sawmill.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231294
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1989 Feb;15(1):18-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1989
Author
P. Jäppinen
E. Pukkala
S. Tola
Author Affiliation
Enso-Gutzeit Oy, Occupational Health Centre, Imatra, Finland.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1989 Feb;15(1):18-23
Date
Feb-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chlorophenols - adverse effects
Dust - adverse effects
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Wood
Abstract
The cancer incidence of 1,223 sawmill workers with continuous employment of at least one year between 1 January 1945 and 31 December 1961 was followed until 31 December 1980. Separate analyses were made for the 801 workers hired after 1 January 1945, and smoking habits were surveyed. Among the men, 90 cases of primary cancer were detected versus 83.5 expected and among the women 55 cancer cases versus 44.5 expected. Skin cancer was in excess among the men, especially among those employed after 1 January 1945. Lip, mouth, and pharynx cancer and lymphomas were also slightly in excess among the men, as was leukemia among both sexes. Workplace exposure, especially to chlorophenols, may be associated with the excess skin cancer and the slight excess of lymphomas, but this finding should be further evaluated with special emphasis on well-defined exposure data.
PubMed ID
2922584 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence of workers in the Finnish pulp and paper industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235114
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1987 Jun;13(3):197-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1987
Author
P. Jäppinen
T. Hakulinen
E. Pukkala
S. Tola
K. Kurppa
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1987 Jun;13(3):197-202
Date
Jun-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Finland
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Paper
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The cancer incidence of 3,545 workers in the Finnish pulp and paper industry was assessed in a retrospective cohort study. The cohort included workers with continuous employment of at least one year between 1 January 1945 and 31 December 1961 and was followed until 31 December 1980. Six subcohorts were formed (sulfite mill, sulfate mill, paper mill, board mill, maintenance department, and power plant). Separate analyses were made for the 2,597 workers hired after 1 January 1945. The smoking habits were surveyed. Among the men, 196 cases of primary cancer were detected versus 203.8 expected [standardized incidence ratio (SIR) 96, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 82-114], and there were 47 cancer cases among the women versus 57.9 expected (SIR 91, 95% CI 60-108). Lung cancer occurred in 78 men (62.6 expected, SIR 125, 95% CI 98-155), and the excess was the most prominent for the male board mill workers (40 observed, 81.1 expected, SIR 222, 95% CI 158-302), particularly after 20 year's latency (25 observed, 7.8 expected, SIR 323, 95% CI 209-476). Analogous excesses of lung cancer occurred among the men (especially the male board mill workers) who began work after 1 January 1945. The findings were not explained by smoking habits.
PubMed ID
3616546 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular mortality among pulp mill workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229327
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1990 Apr;47(4):259-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
P. Jäppinen
S. Tola
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Centre, Enso-Gutzeit Oy, Imatra, Finland.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1990 Apr;47(4):259-62
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - chemically induced - mortality
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hydrogen Sulfide - adverse effects
Male
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Paper
Sulfides - adverse effects
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Abstract
A mortality study, concentrating on cardiovascular mortality, was undertaken among Finnish sulphite mill workers exposed to sulphur dioxide and sulphate mill workers exposed to hydrogen sulphide and organic sulphides. They had been employed continuously for at least one year between 1945 and 1961. National death rates were used for comparison and mortality was followed up until 31 December 1981. Among the cohort exposed to sulphur dioxide (2268 person-years), an excess of cardiovascular deaths was noticed among the men (24 obs, 19.4 exp, SMR 123) due to an excess of coronary deaths (18 obs, 12.4 exp, SMR 145). The cardiovascular mortality was not affected by the duration of occupational exposure or follow up period in this cohort. Among the men exposed to hydrogen sulphide and organic sulphides (4179 person-years), there was also an excess of cardiovascular deaths (37 obs, 24.7 exp, SMR 150) due to an excess of coronary deaths (25 obs, 16.7 exp, SMR 150). These excesses increased with longer follow up period. As common risk factors of coronary heart disease could not explain the findings in the sulphate mill cohort, they may be associated with exposure to hydrogen sulphide and organic sulphides.
Notes
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1979 May;36(2):127-34465376
Cites: Biochim Biophys Acta. 1980 Feb 8;589(2):324-356243968
Cites: Chest. 1982 Mar;81(3):285-97056102
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1983 Jun 11;286(6381):1857-606407602
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1987 Sep;44(9):580-73663525
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1984 Dec;45(12):787-906517022
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1986 Dec;12(6):552-603823804
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1986 Dec;12(6):619-263823812
Cites: J Occup Med. 1984 Nov;26(11):844-66502289
PubMed ID
2337534 View in PubMed
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Characterization and control of terpene emissions in Finnish sawmills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194853
Source
AIHAJ. 2001 Mar-Apr;62(2):172-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
I. Welling
T. Mielo
J. Räisänen
M. Hyvärinen
T. Liukkonen
T. Nurkka
P. Lonka
C. Rosenberg
Y. Peltonen
U. Svedberg
P. Jäppinen
Author Affiliation
Lappeenranta Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Laserkatu 6, FIN-53850, Lappeenranta, Finland.
Source
AIHAJ. 2001 Mar-Apr;62(2):172-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - prevention & control
Finland
Humans
Industry
Seasons
Terpenes - analysis
Wood
Abstract
This article describes an experimental study of terpene emission rates during fresh pine and spruce sawing and processing. Total terpene emission was determined by summing the product of the exhaust airflow rate and the mean concentration in the exhaust. Terpene concentrations were measured at fixed sampling points between the sawing lines. Terpene emission during pine sawing was found to be around 10 times greater than that during spruce sawing. The emission rates given here can be used to predict emission rates for various production rates. The predicted emission rates can be used in mass balance models to predict concentrations or required airflow rates to achieve the target concentration level.
PubMed ID
11331989 View in PubMed
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Exposure of workers to 2,3,7,8-substituted polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) and dibenzofuran (PCDF) compounds in sawmills previously using chlorophenol-containing antistain agents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205762
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1998 Mar-Apr;53(2):99-108
Publication Type
Article
Author
H. Kontsas
C. Rosenberg
J. Tornaeus
P. Mutanen
P. Jäppinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1998 Mar-Apr;53(2):99-108
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Benzofurans - adverse effects - blood - chemistry
Chlorophenols - adverse effects
Chromatography, Gas
Environmental monitoring
Female
Finland
Half-Life
Humans
Isomerism
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - blood - chemistry
Wood
Abstract
The use of chlorophenol-containing antistain agents (e.g., Ky5, a wood preservative) ceased in Finland at the end of the 1980s, after 5 decades of use. Exposure of workers to the impurities in these agents (i.e., polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins [PCDDs] and dibenzofurans [PCDFs]) was assessed at three sawmills at which personnel used a sodium chlorophenate product as an antistain agent. Given that compounds accumulate in body fat and their half-lives in humans are long, we could determine 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDDs and PCDFs 5-9 y after the last exposure occurred. We used high-resolution gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry to determine PCDDs/PCDFs in plasma from 39 Ky5-exposed workers and 18 nonexposed workers. The average total plasma concentration of PCDD/PCDF of the Ky5-exposed workers at the three sawmills were 1018, 945, and 1165 pg/g fat, and corresponding concentrations in the nonexposed workers were 743, 1124, and 844 pg/g fat, respectively. We found no significant differences in total levels between Ky5-exposed workers and nonexposed workers. However, concentrations of the 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDF isomer were significantly higher (p
PubMed ID
9577932 View in PubMed
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Exposure to monoterpenes in Finnish sawmills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200582
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Sep;Suppl 1:149-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
C. Rosenberg
A. Ruonakangas
T. Liukkonen
I. Welling
P. Jäppinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Chemistry Laboratory, Helsinki, Finland. christina.rosenberg@occuphealth.fi
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Sep;Suppl 1:149-51
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - toxicity
Finland
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Occupational Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Terpenes - analysis - toxicity
Wood
PubMed ID
10519818 View in PubMed
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A mortality study of Finnish pulp and paper workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234756
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1987 Sep;44(9):580-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1987
Author
P. Jäppinen
Author Affiliation
Enso-Gutzeit Oy, Occupational Health Centre, Imatra, Finland.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1987 Sep;44(9):580-7
Date
Sep-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death
Coronary Disease - mortality
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Paper
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Mortality among workers in the Finnish pulp and paper industry was evaluated in a retrospective cohort study of 3520 workers who had been employed continuously for at least one year between 1945 and 1961. Six subcohorts were formed according to six work areas: sulphite, sulphate, paper, and board mills, maintenance department, and power plant. National mortality rates were used for comparison. The mortality of a cohort of 1290 sawmill workers was also studied in order to have a socially, geographically, and occupationally similar group without the exposures typical of the pulp and paper industry for comparison. Smoking habits were surveyed. Mortality was followed up until 31 December 1981. Overall mortality for the entire cohort did not differ from that expected (1044 obs, 1029.4 exp, SMR 101), but there was an excess of deaths from diseases of the circulatory system among the men (489 obs, 404.9 exp, SMR 121). This was due to the excess of deaths from ischaemic heart disease found among the men at the sulphite, sulphate, and paper mills, maintenance department, and power plant, but not at the sawmill. The existing smoking data did not explain this finding and it may therefore be associated with occupational exposures.
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1976 Jun;103(6):539-50937339
Cites: Lancet. 1967 Jul 15;2(7507):136-74165646
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1976;271:294-3001069517
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1978 Feb;60(2):295-8621749
Cites: Lancet. 1978 Sep 16;2(8090):626-780546
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1979 May;36(2):127-34465376
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1980 Feb;45(2):127-407364489
Cites: Chest. 1982 Mar;81(3):285-97056102
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1982 Sep-Oct;37(5):295-97138080
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1982;51(1):65-717152703
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1983 Jun 11;286(6381):1857-606407602
Cites: J Occup Med. 1984 Nov;26(11):844-66502289
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1984 Dec;45(12):787-906517022
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1986 Dec;12(6):619-263823812
Cites: J Occup Med. 1976 Dec;18(12):797-801993873
PubMed ID
3663525 View in PubMed
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Predictive validity of symptoms and signs in the neck and shoulders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197546
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2000 Aug;53(8):800-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
E. Viikari-Juntura
E. Takala
H. Riihimäki
R. Martikainen
P. Jäppinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FIN-00250, Helsinki, Finland. evii@occuphealth.fi
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2000 Aug;53(8):800-8
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Health Services - standards
Physical Examination - standards
Predictive value of tests
Primary Health Care - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Shoulder Pain - epidemiology
Abstract
A standardized examination protocol was developed for the assessment of neck and shoulder disorders in primary health care. We investigated to what extent the symptoms and signs can predict sick leave due to neck and shoulder disorders. Our study involved 474 patients seeking medical advice from an occupational health service. Most of the 20 symptoms and 15 signs of the protocol were associated with the number of sick leave days within the 60-day postexamination period, but only three symptoms (short duration, high pain intensity, and continuous pain) and two signs (pain in the upper limb during rotation of head and pain in the shoulder during abduction of arm) retained their significance in a multivariate model. No unambiguous subset of protocol items can be suggested for general use. The predictive validity should be tested in other populations and settings before a conclusion is drawn about the external validity of the results.
PubMed ID
10942862 View in PubMed
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Smoking among Finnish pulp and paper workers--evaluation of its confounding effect on lung cancer and coronary heart disease rates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236206
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1986 Dec;12(6):619-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
P. Jäppinen
S. Tola
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1986 Dec;12(6):619-26
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Paper
Risk
Smoking
Abstract
The possible confounding caused by smoking was studied in connection with a mortality and cancer incidence study of 3,520 workers in the pulp and paper industry. A group 1,290 sawmill workers was used for comparison in addition to the expected numbers based on national statistics. A total of 801 questionnaires was sent to a representative sample of the workers, 537 to people still alive and 264 to the next-of-kin of decedents. The reply percentage was 86.6 for the former and 80.9 for the latter. The prevalence of smoking was determined for 1956 and 1981. The proportions of moderate and heavy smokers were assessed for 1981, and smoking indices were calculated for each occupational group. The estimated rate ratios for lung cancer in relation to smoking categories and the corresponding smoking-adjusted standardized incidence ratios were calculated for 1981, and they were compared with the observed standardized incidence ratios for lung cancer. The smoking habits could not explain the observed excess of lung cancer, nor the increased mortality from coronary heart disease found among the pulp and paper workers. Postal questionnaires may be a feasible tool for assessing smoking habits in retrospective cohort studies.
PubMed ID
3823812 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.