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Descriptive analytical data and consequences for calculation of common reference intervals in the Nordic Reference Interval Project 2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51987
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(4):343-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
P. Rustad
P. Felding
A. Lahti
P. Hyltoft Petersen
Author Affiliation
Fürst Medical Laboratory, Søren Bulls Vei 25, NO-1051 Oslo, Norway. prustad@furst.no
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(4):343-70
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Chemical Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Chemistry, Clinical - standards
Clinical Chemistry Tests - standards
Clinical Medicine - standards
Databases, Factual
Europe
Humans
International Cooperation
Laboratories, Hospital - standards
Reference Values
Abstract
In the Nordic Reference Interval Project (NORIP), data from 102 Nordic clinical chemical laboratories were obtained. Each laboratory reported analytical data on up to 25 of the most commonly used clinical biochemical properties, including results from each of a minimum of 25 reference individuals. A reference material consisting of a liquid frozen pool of serum with values traceable to reference methods (used as the project "calibrator" for non-enzymes to correct reference values) was measured together with other serum pool controls in each laboratory in the same analytical series as the project samples. The data on the controls were used to evaluate the analytical quality of the routine methods. For reference interval calculations, only such reference values on enzymes were accepted that were obtained by applying the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) compatible methods (37 degrees C), while "calibrator"-corrected reference values were used in the cases of non-enzymes. For each property, gender- and age-specific reference intervals were estimated, based on simple non-parametric calculations and using objective criteria to perform partitioning into subgroups. It is concluded that the same reference intervals are applicable in all five Nordic countries. The following descriptive data for the considered properties are presented in the tables: number of measurement values from each country and measurement system, certified/indicative target values for controls, differences between methods and measurement systems together with coefficients of variation, effects of control correction on the measurement values, differences between subgroups as determined by age, gender, country and material, and comparison of the new reference intervals with those presented in standard textbooks. The 25 components involved in this project were (listed in alphabetical order): Alanine transaminase, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, amylase, amylase pancreatic type, aspartate transaminase, bilirubin, calcium, carbamide, cholesterol, creatine kinase, creatininium, gamma-glutamyltransferase, glucose, HDL-cholesterol, iron, iron-binding capacity, lactate dehydrogenase, magnesium, phosphate, potassium, protein, sodium, triglyceride and urate.
PubMed ID
15223700 View in PubMed
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Effects of posture on concentrations of blood constituents in healthy adults: practical application of blood specimen collection procedures recommended by the Scandinavian Committee on Reference Values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246200
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1980;40(7):615-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
P. Felding
N. Tryding
P. Hyltoft Petersen
M. Hørder
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1980;40(7):615-21
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Blood Proteins - analysis
Blood Specimen Collection - methods - standards
Enzymes - blood
Female
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Posture
Reference Values
Scandinavia
Sex Factors
Abstract
Different procedures for the collection of blood for the determination of reference values in healthy adults have been subjected to practical testing. The Scandinavian Committee on Reference Values suggested that subjects lying in bed after an overnight sleep and ambulatory individuals, after 15 min of sitting in a chair, were two suitable and different reference populations. In forty subjects we found an increase from lying to sitting position of about 6.5% in the serum concentrations of proteins, enzymes and lipids. The corresponding increases for S-calcium and B-haemoglobin were approximately 3% whereas S-thyroxine, unexpectedly, changed by 11%. There were no significant changes of potassium and sodium values. For some constituents the changes were age and sex-dependent being greater in a group of elderly women as compared to a group of younger men. After 1 h of recumbency the concentrations of the constituents generally returned to those in the initial, lying position.
PubMed ID
7466290 View in PubMed
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Evidence for a substantial genetic influence on biochemical liver function tests: results from a population-based Danish twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10311
Source
Clin Chem. 2001 Jan;47(1):81-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
L. Bathum
H C Petersen
J U Rosholm
P. Hyltoft Petersen
J. Vaupel
K. Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Odense University Hospital, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark. Lise.Bathum@ouh.fyns-amt.dk
Source
Clin Chem. 2001 Jan;47(1):81-7
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alanine Transaminase - blood
Albumins - analysis
Alcohol Drinking
Bilirubin - analysis
Body mass index
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Denmark
Environment
Female
Genotype
Humans
Interviews
L-Lactate Dehydrogenase - blood
Liver - enzymology - metabolism
Liver Function Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sex Factors
Twin Studies
Variation (Genetics)
gamma-Glutamyltransferase - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Biochemical liver function tests are widely used in the clinic and are some of the most frequently used tests in screening for diseases in older age groups. The aim of the present study was to estimate the relative importance of genetic and environmental factors to variations in these tests among the elderly. METHODS: We conducted a survey among Danish twins, 73-102 years of age, identified in the population-based Danish Twin Registry. Among the 2749 individuals in the study population, an interview was conducted with 79%. From these, a blood sample was collected from 290 same-sex twin pairs, total of 580 subjects, within a 6-month period and analyzed for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), bilirubin, and albumin. The interview included questions about alcohol consumption and body mass index (BMI; self-calculated height and weight). Heritability (proportion of the population variance attributable to genetic variation) was estimated using structural-equation analyses before and after correction for alcohol consumption and BMI. RESULTS: Structural-equation analyses revealed a substantial heritability (35-61%) for the four biochemical liver function tests: ALT, GGT, LDH, and bilirubin. The remaining variation could be attributed to individuals' nonfamilial environments. Adjustment for alcohol consumption and BMI had no influence on the heritability for ALT, GGT, LDH, and bilirubin. For albumin, two models fit equally well before adjustment for alcohol and BMI: a model including additive genetic and nonshared environmental factors (AE), and a model including shared and nonshared environmental factors (CE). After adjustment, the model including shared and nonshared environment was clearly the best fitting model. CONCLUSIONS: For both males and females, the effect of genetic factors on the biochemical liver function tests ALT, GGT, LDH, and bilirubin is substantial and accounts for one-third to two-thirds of the variation among individuals 73-102 years of age. The heritability is equal for males and females and does not change notably after controlling for alcohol consumption and BMI. For albumin, no major impact of genetic factors was found independent of BMI and alcohol consumption. An understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying biochemical liver function tests among the very old may be of value in the interpretation of these tests in this age group.
PubMed ID
11148181 View in PubMed
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External quality assurance model for improvement of specificity and accuracy of serum hormone determinations in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103877
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 1990;95(3):257-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Ruokonen
P. Hyltoft-Petersen
O. Blaabjerg
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Oulun Yliopisto, Finland.
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 1990;95(3):257-8
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemistry, Clinical - standards
Hormones - blood
Humans
Quality Control
Reproducibility of Results
Scandinavia
Sensitivity and specificity
PubMed ID
2100403 View in PubMed
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The Nordic Reference Interval Project 2000: recommended reference intervals for 25 common biochemical properties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51988
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(4):271-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
P. Rustad
P. Felding
L. Franzson
V. Kairisto
A. Lahti
A. Mårtensson
P. Hyltoft Petersen
P. Simonsson
H. Steensland
A. Uldall
Author Affiliation
Fürst Medical Laboratory, Søren Bulls vei 25, NO-1051 Oslo, Norway. prustad@furst.no
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(4):271-84
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Chemistry, Clinical - standards
Clinical Chemistry Tests - standards
Clinical Medicine - standards
Europe
Female
Humans
International Cooperation
Laboratories, Hospital - standards
Male
Reference Values
Abstract
Each of 102 Nordic routine clinical biochemistry laboratories collected blood samples from at least 25 healthy reference individuals evenly distributed for gender and age, and analysed 25 of the most commonly requested serum/plasma components from each reference individual. A reference material (control) consisting of a fresh frozen liquid pool of serum with values traceable to reference methods (used as the project "calibrator" for non-enzymes to correct reference values) was analysed together with other serum pool controls in the same series as the project samples. Analytical data, method data and data describing the reference individuals were submitted to a central database for evaluation and calculation of reference intervals intended for common use in the Nordic countries. In parallel to the main project, measurements of commonly requested haematology properties on EDTA samples were also carried out, mainly by laboratories in Finland and Sweden. Aliquots from reference samples were submitted to storage in a central bio-bank for future establishment of reference intervals for other properties. The 25 components were, in alphabetical order: alanine transaminase, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, amylase, amylase pancreatic, aspartate transaminase, bilirubins, calcium, carbamide, cholesterol, creatine kinase, creatininium, gamma-glutamyltransferase, glucose, HDL-cholesterol, iron, iron binding capacity, lactate dehydrogenase, magnesium, phosphate, potassium, protein, sodium, triglyceride and urate.
PubMed ID
15223694 View in PubMed
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Reference individuals, blood collection, treatment of samples and descriptive data from the questionnaire in the Nordic Reference Interval Project 2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9451
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(4):327-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
P. Felding
P. Rustad
A. Mårtensson
V. Kairisto
L. Franzson
P. Hyltoft Petersen
A. Uldall
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen General Practitioners' Laboratory, Pilestraede 65, DK-1112 Copenhagen, Denmark. pf@kpll.dk
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(4):327-42
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Blood Specimen Collection - methods - standards
Chemistry, Clinical - standards
Clinical Medicine - standards
Europe
Female
Humans
International Cooperation
Laboratories, Hospital - standards
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Abstract
The rules for recruitment of reference individuals, inclusion and preparation of individuals, blood collection, treatment of samples (and control materials) and analysis at the 102 medical laboratories attending the Nordic Reference Interval Project (NORIP) are given as well as the rules for central exclusion of reference individuals. The individuals (18-91-year-olds) should be evenly distributed on age and gender groups. The 3002 reference individuals who contributed at least one reference value to the finally suggested reference intervals were characterized using the information in the questionnaire. Gender, age and country are the main entries in the tables. Other variables in the cross-tables or figure are height, weight, body mass index, ethnic origin, heredity for diabetes, chronic disease, oestrogens or oral contraceptives, other medication, hard physical activity, previous blood donations, smoking habits, use of alcohol, hours since last meal and time of blood collection (hour, day of week, month, year). The Danes had the highest alcohol consumption and the Icelanders had the highest body mass index. The information in this article may interest potential users of the Nordic Reference Interval Project bio-bank and database (NOBIDA) in which serum, Li-heparin plasma and EDTA buffy coat from the mentioned individuals are stored below -80 degrees C.
PubMed ID
15223699 View in PubMed
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Serum lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme 1 and prediction of death in patients with metastatic testicular germ cell tumors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19932
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2001 Jan;39(1):38-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
F E von Eyben
O. Blaabjerg
P. Hyltoft-Petersen
E L Madsen
R. Amato
F. Liu
H. Fritsche
Author Affiliation
The Department of Clinical Chemistry, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. feve@post5.tele.dk
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2001 Jan;39(1):38-44
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chorionic Gonadotropin - blood
Humans
Isoenzymes - blood
L-Lactate Dehydrogenase - blood - chemistry
Male
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal - blood - enzymology - mortality
Predictive value of tests
ROC Curve
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Testicular Neoplasms - blood - enzymology - mortality
Time Factors
Tumor Markers, Biological
alpha-Fetoproteins - metabolism
Abstract
The International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group study of patients with metastatic testicular germ cell tumors showed that catalytic concentration of serum lactate dehydrogenase (S-LD), serum alpha-fetoprotein concentration (S-AFP), and serum human chorionic gonadotropin concentration (S-hCG) predicted death from tumor. The recent international TNM classification (T primary tumor, N lymph node metastasis, M distant metastasis) is based on these results. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether catalytic concentration of S-LD isoenzyme 1 (S-LD-1) was a better predictor than the criteria used for the international classification. In an evaluation series of 44 patients from Odense University Hospital, Denmark, a raised S-LD-1 (>1.0 x upper limit of reference values) had a predictive value for death from tumor in 5-years observation of 46%. The predictive value was 46% for S-LD, 25% for S-AFP, and 40% for S-hCG. A normal SLD-1 had a predictive value for survival over 5-years observation of 100%. It was 81% for S-LD, 75% for SAFP, and 77% for S-hCG. The fraction of the patients who died of tumor and had a raised tumor marker value was 100% for S-LD-1, 46% for S-LD, 9% for S-AFP, and 18% for S-hCG. The fraction of patients with a normal serum tumor marker value among those who survived was 61% for S-LD-1, 81% for S-LD, 94% for SAFP, and 94% for S-hCG. A validation series of 37 patients treated at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center showed similar findings. Combining the patients in the two series, a raised value of SLD-1 classified more patients into a subgroup with an impaired survival (53%) than S-LD (35%), S-AFP (6%), or S-hCG (11%), and the high risk subgroups based on the international classification (40%). The findings have implications for the staging and treatment of patients with metastatic testicular germ cell tumors.
PubMed ID
11256799 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.