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23 records – page 1 of 3.

An analytical framework for immunization programs in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175852
Source
Vaccine. 2005 Mar 31;23(19):2470-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2005
Author
L J Erickson
P. De Wals
L. Farand
Author Affiliation
Département d'administration de la santé, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada. lonny.erickson@aetmis.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2005 Mar 31;23(19):2470-6
Date
Mar-31-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Policy
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Immunization Programs
Abstract
Recent years have seen an increase in the number of new vaccines available on the Canadian market, and increasing divergence in provincial and territorial immunization programs as jurisdictions must choose among available health interventions with limited funding. We present an analytical framework, which we have developed to assist in the analysis and comparison of potential immunization programs. The framework includes 58 criteria classified into 13 categories, including the burden of disease, vaccine characteristics and immunization strategy, cost-effectiveness, acceptability, feasibility, and evaluability of program, research questions, equity, ethical, legal and political considerations. To date this framework has been utilized in a variety of different contexts, such as to structure expert presentations and reports and to examine the degree of consensus and divergence among experts, and to establish priorities. It can be transformed for a variety of other uses such as educating health professionals and the general public about immunization.
PubMed ID
15752833 View in PubMed
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Complications and sequelae of meningococcal disease in Quebec, Canada, 1990-1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205625
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1998 May;26(5):1159-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
L. Erickson
P. De Wals
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences of the University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke University Hospital Clinical Research Center, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1998 May;26(5):1159-64
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Bacteremia - complications - microbiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Meningitis, Meningococcal - complications - microbiology
Meningococcal Infections - complications - microbiology
Middle Aged
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - isolation & purification
Quality of Life
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
Serotyping
Abstract
To study complications and sequelae of serogroup B and C meningococcal disease, a retrospective survey examined the outcome of all culture-proven cases reported in the province of Quebec, Canada, from January 1990 through December 1994 (serogroup B, 167 cases; serogroup C, 304 cases). Data were collected from medical files, postal questionnaires, and telephone interviews. Age groups having the most cases were the 10-19-year age group for serogroup C and the
PubMed ID
9597245 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness of a lottery for increasing physicians' responses to a mail survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195508
Source
Eval Health Prof. 2001 Mar;24(1):47-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
G. Baron
P. De Wals
F. Milord
Author Affiliation
Faculté de médecine, Université de Sherbrooke.
Source
Eval Health Prof. 2001 Mar;24(1):47-52
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Data Collection - economics - methods
Humans
Marketing of Health Services - economics - methods
Motivation
Physicians - psychology
Postal Service
Quebec
Abstract
To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a lottery on physicians' responses to a mail survey, a randomized controlled trial was conducted with a random sample of 1,000 members of the Quebec Federation of General Practitioners in 1997. For the first mailing of this survey, each respondent was randomly assigned to the control or experimental group, which was offered participation in a lottery upon return of the questionnaire. Response rate was 41.2% in the experimental group and 34.8% in the control group, a 6.4% difference (CI95%: 0.6%-12.6%). The additional cost of the lottery was about Can$500, giving an incremental cost of Can$16 per questionnaire returned. In conclusion, a lottery resulted in a small but statistically significant increase in the response rate of physicians to a mail survey. This method may be a cost-effective option when applied to large surveys.
PubMed ID
11233584 View in PubMed
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Distribution of single organ malformations in European populations. EUROCAT Working Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59340
Source
Ann Genet. 1995;38(1):32-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
C. Stoll
S. Ayme
R. Beckers
E. Calzolari
M. Cornel
A. Cushieri
P. De Wals
H. Dolk
B. Dott
C. Galanti
Author Affiliation
Institut de Puériculture, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire, Strasbourg, France.
Source
Ann Genet. 1995;38(1):32-43
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Cleft Lip - epidemiology
Down Syndrome - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Extremities
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Neural Tube Defects - epidemiology
Prevalence
Registries
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of congenital anomalies in 19 areas from 13 European countries. A total of 291,126 births were surveyed. On average most of the anomalies were recorded in livebirths. The total prevalence of congenital anomalies was 21.8 per 10,000 births. Four groups of congenital anomalies were of particular note in the consideration of geographic variations: neural tube defects, cleft lip, limb reduction defect and Down syndrome. For neural tube defects, 24 cases per 10,000 were recorded in the British Isles whereas only 9.6 cases per 10,000 were registered in Continental Europe. Cleft lip had a much higher prevalence in Groningen (The Netherlands) and in Odense (Denmark) than in the other European countries under study. The prevalence of limb reduction defect was high in Bilbao (Spain), in Odense, in Strasbourg (France) and in Groningen. In the study population the prevalence of Down syndrome ranged from 5.6 to 21.3 per 10,000 livebirths.
Notes
Erratum In: Ann Genet 1995;38(4):216
PubMed ID
7625757 View in PubMed
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Does informing patients of the risk of acquiring Guillain-Barré syndrome following influenza vaccination have an effect on their willingness to be vaccinated?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196285
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2000 Dec 1;26(23):205-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2000
Author
P. De Wals
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Services, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Que.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2000 Dec 1;26(23):205-7
Date
Dec-1-2000
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Guillain-Barre Syndrome - etiology
Humans
Influenza Vaccines - adverse effects
Informed consent
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Risk factors
PubMed ID
11131690 View in PubMed
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Dose information needed to assess effect of exposure to radiation in utero.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65302
Source
BMJ. 1989 Jun 24;298(6689):1710
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-24-1989

Effectiveness of a mass immunization campaign against serogroup C meningococcal disease in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195996
Source
JAMA. 2001 Jan 10;285(2):177-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2001
Author
P. De Wals
G. De Serres
T. Niyonsenga
Author Affiliation
Département des sciences de la santé communautaire, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Ave N, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada J1H 5N4. pdewals@courrier.usherb.ca
Source
JAMA. 2001 Jan 10;285(2):177-81
Date
Jan-10-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antigens, Bacterial
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Immunization Programs
Incidence
Infant
Logistic Models
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Meningococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - immunology
Polysaccharides, Bacterial
Quebec - epidemiology
Serotyping
Abstract
An outbreak of meningococcal disease in Quebec province prompted a mass immunization program. The impact of this campaign on the epidemiology of meningococcal disease has not been studied.
To study the impact of a mass immunization campaign using polysaccharide vaccine on the epidemiology of meningococcal disease (MCD) and to assess serogroup C vaccine effectiveness (VE).
Analysis of MCD cases reported in Quebec from 1990 to 1998, before and after the mass immunization campaign was conducted during the winter of 1992-1993, when 84% of residents aged 6 months to 20 years (the target population, approximately 1.9 million individuals) were vaccinated.
Incidence of MCD in 1990-1998; incidence of culture-proven serogroup C MCD between April 1, 1993, and March 31, 1998, compared among vaccinated and unvaccinated persons in the target population.
The incidence of serogroup C disease decreased after the mass immunization campaign, from 1.4 per 100 000 in 1990-1992 to 0.3 per 100 000 in 1993-1998, and the overall incidence of other serogroups remained stable at 0.7 per 100 000, with a small increase in the proportion of cases caused by serogroup Y (P =.009). Protection from serogroup C MCD was indicated in the first 2 years after vaccine administration (VE, 65%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 20%-84%), but not in the next 3 years (VE, 0%; 95% CI, -5% to 65%). Vaccine effectiveness was strongly related to age at vaccination: 83% (95% CI, 39%-96%) for ages 15 through 20 years, 75% (95% CI, - 17% to 93%) for ages 10 through 14 years, and 41% (95% CI, -106% to 79%) for ages 2 through 9 years. There was no evidence of protection in children younger than 2 years; all 8 MCD cases in this age group occurred in vaccinees.
Serogroup C polysaccharide vaccine is effective for controlling outbreaks in teenaged individuals but should not be used in children younger than 2 years. The mass campaign did not induce significant serogroup switching.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 2001 Mar 28;285(12):1578-911268264
PubMed ID
11176810 View in PubMed
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Effects of the Chernobyl radiological contamination on human reproduction in western Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59883
Source
Prog Clin Biol Res. 1990;340C:339-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
P. De Wals
H. Dolk
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Catholic University of Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.
Source
Prog Clin Biol Res. 1990;340C:339-46
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - genetics
Accidents
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mutation
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Reproduction - radiation effects
Ukraine
PubMed ID
2381932 View in PubMed
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Impact of a mass immunization campaign against serogroup C meningococcus in the Province of Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213368
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1996;74(4):407-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
P. De Wals
M. Dionne
M. Douville-Fradet
N. Boulianne
J. Drapeau
G. De Serres
Author Affiliation
Community Health Sciences Department, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke (C.H.U.S), Quebec, Canada.
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1996;74(4):407-11
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antigens, Bacterial - immunology
Bacterial Vaccines
Child
Child, Preschool
Costs and Cost Analysis
Humans
Immunization - economics - methods
Infant
Meningitis, Meningococcal - epidemiology - prevention & control
Meningococcal Vaccines
Neisseria meningitidis - immunology
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - immunology
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
A mass immunization campaign was conducted in the Province of Quebec, Canada, during the winter of 1993, following an increase in the incidence of meningococcal disease, which was mainly caused by a virulent clone of Neisseria meningitidis, serogroup C, serotype 2a. About 1.6 million doses of the polysaccharide vaccine were administered, covering 84% of the target population aged between 6 months and 20 years; the overall cost was about 25.5 million Canadian dollars. Cases notified to the regional health authorities by clinicians, hospital laboratories, and the provincial reference laboratory from January 1990 up to March 1994 have been included in the analysis. In the first year following the campaign, the incidence of the disease dropped markedly among vaccinees as well as the unvaccinated fraction of the target population, while it remained unchanged among persons aged more than 20 years. This suggests the existence of herd immunity. The overall field efficacy of the vaccine was 79%, more in teenagers and less in under-5-year-olds. A minimum of 37 cases were prevented during the first year.
Notes
Cites: J Exp Med. 1969 Jun 1;129(6):1385-954977284
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1970 Jul;92(1):25-324987716
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1971;45(3):279-825316907
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Feb 15;154(4):503-78630839
Cites: Stat Med. 1993 Feb;12(3-4):249-638456210
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Feb 1;273(5):383-97823383
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Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1991 Nov;29(11):2489-931774254
PubMed ID
8823963 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.