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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Cancer of the nasopharynx in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236714
Source
Am J Clin Oncol. 1986 Aug;9(4):281-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1986
Author
A D Flores
R I Dickson
K. Riding
P. Coy
Source
Am J Clin Oncol. 1986 Aug;9(4):281-91
Date
Aug-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Carcinoma - epidemiology
China - ethnology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - radiotherapy
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Abstract
The Chinese population in British Columbia has been increasing in recent years due to the migration of the Chinese from Southern China, which has tripled during the last decade. From 1939 to 1980, 296 cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) were seen at the Cancer Control Agency of British Columbia (CCABC). Of these, 167 (56%) were Chinese and 119 (40%) were Caucasians. The incidence of cancer of the nasopharynx in the Chinese born in China was 115 times greater than Caucasians before 1970 and 107 times greater in the 1970s. The incidence of NPC in the Caucasian population remained unchanged as did that of the North American-born Chinese (six times greater than that of the Caucasians) for the last 2 decades. The overall survival for all cases was 39% at 5 years and 28% at 10 years. The survival of cases was better in patients treated after 1970 (48% at 5 years and 36% at 10 years) than in patients treated before 1970 (34% at 5 years and 20% at 10 years). The survival was 50% at 5 years for all N0 cases but it was only 27% in patients with nodal metastasis. The survival of NPC was related essentially to initial staging, type and dose of irradiation, and pre-irradiation biopsy of neck metastasis. The survival was not significantly related to birth place, race, or histological grade.
PubMed ID
3751965 View in PubMed
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The cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of high-dose palliative radiotherapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196688
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2000 Nov 1;48(4):1025-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2000
Author
P. Coy
J. Schaafsma
J A Schofield
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Island Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Victoria, BC, Canada.
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2000 Nov 1;48(4):1025-33
Date
Nov-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Staging
Palliative Care - economics
Prospective Studies
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Radiotherapy - economics
Abstract
To compute cost-effectiveness/cost-utility (CE/CU) ratios, from the treatment clinic and societal perspectives, for high-dose palliative radiotherapy treatment (RT) for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) against best supportive care (BSC) as comparator, and thereby demonstrate a method for computing CE/CU ratios when randomized clinical trial (RCT) data cannot be generated.
Unit cost estimates based on an earlier reported 1989-90 analysis of treatment costs at the Vancouver Island Cancer Centre, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, are updated to 1997-1998 and then used to compute the incremental cost of an average dose of high-dose palliative RT. The incremental number of life days and quality-adjusted life days (QALDs) attributable to treatment are from earlier reported regression analyses of the survival and quality-of-life data from patients who enrolled prospectively in a lung cancer management cost-effectiveness study at the clinic over a 2-year period from 1990 to 1992.
The baseline CE and CU ratios are $9245 Cdn per life year (LY) and $12,836 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY), respectively, from the clinic perspective; and $12,253/LY and $17,012/QALY, respectively, from the societal perspective. Multivariate sensitivity analysis for the CE ratio produces a range of $5513-28,270/LY from the clinic perspective, and $7307-37,465/LY from the societal perspective. Similar calculations for the CU ratio produce a range of $7205-37, 134/QALY from the clinic perspective, and $9550-49,213/QALY from the societal perspective.
The cost effectiveness and cost utility of high-dose palliative RT for advanced NSCLC compares favorably with the cost effectiveness of other forms of treatment for NSCLC, of treatments of other forms of cancer, and of many other commonly used medical interventions; and lies within the US $50, 000/QALY benchmark often cited for cost-effective care.
PubMed ID
11072159 View in PubMed
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The development and implementation of a revised municipal bylaw to control environmental tobacco smoke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221613
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Mar-Apr;84(2):118-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
L P Brigden
S H Peck
P. Coy
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Education, Capital Regional District Health, Victoria, B.C.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Mar-Apr;84(2):118-21
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Consumer Participation
Humans
Local Government
Politics
Program Development
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Public Relations
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Urban health
Abstract
A bylaw to regulate the contamination of the environment by tobacco smoke was introduced in the Capital Regional District, Victoria, British Columbia as of January 1st, 1991. This smoking control bylaw rigorously limits smoking in all public premises and restricts size, ventilation and location of designated smoking areas. As of January 1st, 1992 all workplaces in this area have become completely smoke-free. This paper describes the process of developing and implementing a municipal smoking control bylaw. Publicity is essential to raise awareness of the issue and to provide information. Engendering of political and public support and the adoption of an appropriate time line for introduction of the bylaw are also important components of the process. Legislation to control tobacco use has been shown to be an effective component of a comprehensive tobacco reduction strategy. Public health officials are urged to consider the implementation of similar policies to combat the health risks posed by environmental tobacco smoke.
PubMed ID
8334603 View in PubMed
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Early diagnosis of carcinoma of the lung. Simultaneous screening with chest X-ray and sputum cytology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109743
Source
Cancer. 1970 Jan;25(1):113-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1970

Implicit rationing criteria in non-small-cell lung cancer treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212574
Source
Br J Cancer. 1996 Mar;73(6):781-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
K. Arndt
P. Coy
J. Schaafsma
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, University of Victoria, Canada.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1996 Mar;73(6):781-8
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - therapy
Female
Health Care Rationing
Humans
Logistic Models
Lung Neoplasms - therapy
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Smoking
Abstract
Data collected from lung cancer patients attending the Victoria Clinic of the British Columbia Cancer Agency are used to investigate how resources are rationed in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). An ordered logit model is estimated to analyse empirically the relationship between treatment selection and: tumour stage, size and differentiation; the Feinstein index; Karnofsky performance status (KPS); and the patient's age, gender and marital and smoking status. Implicit rationing is found to occur with respect to all of these factors except the Feinstein index, gender and marital status. With respect to age, KPS and smoker status the main empirical results are: (a) an increase in age from 50 to 85 reduces the expected treatment expenditure by 50-70%, depending on the patient's KPS and smoker status; (b) patients with a KPS less than 80 and of 80, receive 30-46% and 75-85%, respectively, of the expected treatment expenditure for patients with a KPS of 90 or 100, depending on age and smoker status; (c) the expected treatment expenditure for active smokers is about 71-86% of the expenditure for non- or former smokers depending on age and KPS.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1993 Jul;37(1):61-78332926
Cites: Milbank Q. 1988;66(4):640-603151121
Cites: Clin Invest Med. 1994 Dec;17(6):577-877895422
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1964 Jul;61:27-4314175841
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1970 Aug;23(2):105-155455352
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1981 Sep 17;305(12):667-726790988
Cites: JAMA. 1983 Apr 15;249(15):2047-536834594
Cites: JAMA. 1983 Apr 22-29;249(16):2208-196834619
Cites: Cancer. 1985 Oct 15;56(8):2107-112992757
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1985 Sep;33(9):585-94031335
Cites: Chest. 1986 Apr;89(4 Suppl):225S-233S3514171
Cites: JAMA. 1986 Jun 27;255(24):3385-903712698
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1987 Jun;13(6):929-343034842
Cites: JAMA. 1987 Aug 21;258(7):927-303449075
Cites: JAMA. 1987 Dec 4;258(21):3125-303669259
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1988 Mar 10;318(10):612-72830514
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1988;27(11):1139-453206248
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1993 Jul;37(2):153-88351530
PubMed ID
8611380 View in PubMed
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Lung cancer mortality according to birthplace.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110511
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1968 Sep 14;99(10):476-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-14-1968
Author
P. Coy
S. Grzybowski
J F Rowe
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1968 Sep 14;99(10):476-83
Date
Sep-14-1968
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Notes
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1965 Dec;19(4):661-805862652
Cites: Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1966 Jan;19:287-995905671
Cites: Thorax. 1966 Mar;21(2):132-85935840
Cites: Scand J Respir Dis. 1966;47(3):161-725181004
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1966 Dec;20(4):595-6235964597
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1967 Jun;21(2):243-596028078
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1963 Nov 23;89:1084-9114079129
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Dec 3;95(23):1172-45921474
PubMed ID
4952490 View in PubMed
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Radiation therapy for seminoma of the testis: results in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245441
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1980 Sep 20;123(6):507-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1980
Author
S M Jackson
I. Olivotto
M G McLoughlin
P. Coy
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1980 Sep 20;123(6):507-12
Date
Sep-20-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Cobalt Radioisotopes - therapeutic use
Dysgerminoma - mortality - radiotherapy
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Testicular Neoplasms - mortality - radiotherapy
Abstract
Between 1942 and 1978 radiation therapy was given to 362 patients with seminoma of the testis, 40 (11%) of whom had a history of maldescent of either testis. The disease was classified retrospectively according to the extent of the primary tumor, the involvement of the regional lymph nodes and the presence of distant metastases (the TNM system), and the results of treatment were analysed according to the classifications. Among the 275 patients referred for treatment at least 5 years before this analysis the 5-year survival rates were 87% overall, 96% for those with a T1 or T2 (relatively localized) tumour but no evidence of nodal involvement or distant metastases and 62% for the 24 with palpable or distant metastases at the time of clinical presentation. Of the 28 patients in whom the disease recurred 15 were successfully treated. A second primary testicular tumour developed in the contralateral testis of eight patients. The incidence of other cancers was not increased over the expected rate in the general male population of the same age.
Notes
Cites: Cancer. 1973 Nov;32(5):1212-64202188
Cites: J Urol. 1974 Sep;112(3):354-64152947
Cites: Radiology. 1975 Aug;116(02):401-41171506
Cites: Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1975 Nov;4(3):665-9258746
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1976 Jan-Feb;1(3-4):235-48823137
Cites: J Urol. 1977 Nov;118(5):88221310
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Oct 20;121(8):1065-8, 1071543995
PubMed ID
7437970 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.