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The effect of a geriatric education program on emergency nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196009
Source
J Emerg Nurs. 2001 Feb;27(1):27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
C. Brymer
P. Cavanagh
E. Denomy
K. Wells
C. Cook
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatric Medicine, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. cbrymer@julian.uwo.ca
Source
J Emerg Nurs. 2001 Feb;27(1):27-32
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Emergency Nursing - education
Geriatrics - education
Humans
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns
Program Evaluation
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
In a previous study, emergency nurses gave a high priority to the educational topics of geriatric depression, physical assessment of the elderly, and mental status testing. Our objective was to measure the impact of a 1-day workshop for emergency nurses that addressed these educational needs.
The workshop consisted of case-based didactic sessions addressing (1) physical assessment of the elderly, (2) delirium, depression, and dementia, and (3) a practical approach to mental status testing in the elderly. The educational program was evaluated using 2 methods: (1) before, and 1 month after, the workshop, participants rated their own practice patterns; and (2) during the course of 2 years, changes in the number of referrals for geriatric assessment and home care from a large emergency department in the study area were monitored.
Of 101 ED nurses who attended the 1-day workshop, 51 completed both preworkshop and postworkshop questionnaires (response rate, 50.5%). the most significant self-reported changes in practice 1 month after the workshop were improved screening for depression and altered mental status in older adults (P
PubMed ID
11174267 View in PubMed
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Incidence of parathyroid tissue in level VI neck dissection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137241
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Feb;40(1):27-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Jonathan P Cavanagh
Martin Bullock
Robert D Hart
Jonathan R B Trites
Khristian MacDonald
S Mark Taylor
Author Affiliation
Division of Otolaryngology, Dalhousie University, QE II Health Sciences Centre, 5820 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Feb;40(1):27-33
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medical Errors - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neck Dissection - adverse effects
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Parathyroid Glands - pathology
Parathyroidectomy - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Thyroid Diseases - pathology - surgery
Thyroidectomy - adverse effects
Abstract
Level VI central neck dissections are commonly completed with thyroidectomy. This procedure involves risk of damage to, or incidental excision of, one or more of the parathyroid glands.
This study examined the pathology reports of patients undergoing thyroid surgery to determine the incidence of parathyroid tissue associated with level VI neck dissections and the risk factors associated with incidental parathyroidectomy.
Ninety pathology specimens were analyzed. The incidence of parathyroid tissue associated with level VI neck dissections was 41.4%. We discovered that a higher frequency of incidental parathyroid tissue was located in level VI neck dissections among patients discovered to have malignant thyroid disease. There was no significant association between incidental parathyroidectomy and the sex of the patient, the age of the patient, the type of thyroid surgery, or transient or permanent hypoparathyroidism.
A large percentage of level VI neck dissections in thyroid surgery were associated with incidental parathyroid tissue. A more detailed examination of surgical specimens may decrease this possibly preventable surgical complication.
PubMed ID
21303598 View in PubMed
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Tympanocentesis results of a Canadian pediatric myringotomy population, 2008 to 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121131
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2012 Aug;41(4):282-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Maria K Brake
Kyle Jewer
Gordon Flowerdew
Jonathan P Cavanagh
Charles Cron
Paul Hong
Author Affiliation
IWK Health Centre, Division of Otolaryngology, Department of Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS.
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2012 Aug;41(4):282-7
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Ear Ventilation - methods
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Otitis Media with Effusion - epidemiology - surgery
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study was completed to evaluate the middle ear microbiology of a pediatric population with chronic otitis media with effusion and to determine if there has been a change in the spectrum of microorganisms or their antibiotic susceptibility in the modern age of antibiotic therapy.
Retrospective chart review.
A Canadian academic pediatric otolaryngology practice.
This study includes all consecutive patients under the care of one pediatric otolaryngologist undergoing myringotomy and tube placement between the dates of September 2008 and August 2010. Tympanocentesis was performed on each middle ear immediately following the myringotomy, and the specimen was sent for microbiologic analysis.
Culture results and sensitivities were compared to previous similar studies.
A total of 246 children (average age of 4 ± 3 years) and 506 ears had culture results as follows: normal flora, 47%; no growth, 35%; Haemophilus influenzae, 9%; Streptococcus pneumoniae, 4%; Moraxella catarrhalis, 3%; and Staphylococcus aureus, 2%. Ten of the 11 S. aureus cultures were methicillin resistant. The rate of pathogenicity decreased from 36.5% in children aged
PubMed ID
22935180 View in PubMed
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