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Artic medical research in Denmark and Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4352
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1996 Apr;55(2):50-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
P. Bjerregaard
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1996 Apr;55(2):50-1
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Denmark
Environmental health
Greenland
Health Services Research
Humans
Research - trends
PubMed ID
8754598 View in PubMed
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The associations of a marine diet with plasma lipids, blood glucose, blood pressure and obesity among the inuit in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4833
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Sep;54(9):732-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
P. Bjerregaard
H S Pedersen
G. Mulvad
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. p.bjerregaard@dadlnet.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Sep;54(9):732-7
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Blood glucose
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - ethnology - mortality
Diet
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage - blood
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Seals, Earless
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To analyse the associations between the intake of fish and marine mammals and risk factors for cardiovascular disease, ie lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, blood pressure and obesity, in a population whose average consumption of n-3 fatty acids is high compared with Western countries. DESIGN: Information was obtained from a population survey in Greenland: interview data, clinical data and fasting blood samples were obtained from a random sample of Inuit from three towns and four villages. SUBJECTS: Two-hundred and fifty-nine adult Inuit (74% of the sample). RESULTS: Marine diet was positively associated with serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and blood glucose and inversely with very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and triglyceride. Association with low-density lipoprotein (LDL), diastolic and systolic blood pressure, waist-hip ratio and body mass index were inconsistent and not statistically significant. The pattern was similar within groups with low, medium and high consumption of marine food. CONCLUSIONS: There are statistically significant associations between the consumption of marine food and certain lipid fractions in the blood also in this population with a very high average intake of marine food. The observation that blood glucose is positively associated with marine diet in a population survey is new and should be repeated. There was good agreement between the results for the reported consumption of seal and those for the biomarkers. SPONSORSHIP: The study was financially supported by the Greenland Home Rule, Directorate of Health and Research, the Commission for Scientific Research in Greenland, and the Danish Medical Research Council.
PubMed ID
11002386 View in PubMed
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[Average life expectancy and mortality in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36037
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Dec 13;155(50):4097-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-13-1993
Author
P. Bjerregaard
K. Juel
Author Affiliation
Dansk Institut for Klinisk Epidemiologi, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Dec 13;155(50):4097-100
Date
Dec-13-1993
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Life expectancy
Longevity
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
PubMed ID
8273231 View in PubMed
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Avoidable deaths in Greenland 1968-1985: variations by region and period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12169
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1990 Jul;49(3):119-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1990
Author
P. Bjerregaard
K. Juel
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Copenhagen.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1990 Jul;49(3):119-27
Date
Jul-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Female
Greenland
Humans
Male
Mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The concept of avoidable deaths suggests that certain deaths ought not occur in a given society because it is possible to prevent or treat the disease or condition. A list of avoidable deaths is time and community specific as it reflects the socioeconomic conditions, professional medical capacity and political will of the society. A list of avoidable deaths is proposed for Greenland which includes, inter alia, meningitis, lung cancer, acute respiratory infections, suicides, boat accidents and alcohol related diseases and accidents. All were considerably more common in Greenland than in Denmark and several showed an increasing time trend. The regional patterns were particularly clear for infectious diseases and accidents, which showed low mortality rates in the capital and other towns and high mortality rates in settlements and in the remote East Greenland, while mortality rates from suicides and alcohol related diseases were high in the capital and East Greenland and low in West Greenlandic settlements. It is concluded that further studies on preventable diseases and causes of death, in particular certain infectious diseases, accidents and suicides, are needed.
PubMed ID
2206171 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure in people in Greenland assessed by measuring renovasculopathies of hypertension at autopsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211766
Source
Am J Hypertens. 1996 Jun;9(6):560-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
R E Tracy
G. Mulvad
H S Pederson
E. Jul
P. Bjerregaard
W P Newman
Author Affiliation
Queen Ingrid's Hospital, Nuuk, Greenland.
Source
Am J Hypertens. 1996 Jun;9(6):560-5
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Autopsy
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cause of Death
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension, Renal - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology
Kidney - pathology
Louisiana - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Abstract
Surveys taken of blood pressure in Greenland indicated prevailing levels similar to those in the USA. Morphometrically measured renovasculopathies in 88 autopsies confirmed blood pressure levels comparable to the survey findings. At clinic visits, the recorded blood pressures in 48 of the autopsies verified the morphometric conclusions (r = 0.559). By all three approaches, similar levels of blood pressure were determined for the population of Greenland. The agreements in outcome from these approaches serve to substantiate the validity of all three methods. The overall outcome verifies a previous report placing Greenland among the nations which experience rapid rise of blood pressure with age and high prevalence rates for hypertension.
PubMed ID
8783780 View in PubMed
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Cardiac involvement in juvenile amaurotic idiocy--a specific heart muscle disorder. Histological findings in 13 autopsied patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55871
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand [A]. 1981 Sep;89(5):357-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1981
Author
E. Reske-Nielsen
U. Baandrup
P. Bjerregaard
I. Bruun
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand [A]. 1981 Sep;89(5):357-65
Date
Sep-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Calcium - analysis
Cholesterol - analysis
Electrocardiography
Female
Heart Diseases - etiology
Humans
Lipofuscin - analysis
Lipoidosis - complications - pathology
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Myocardium - pathology
Abstract
Juvenile amaurotic idiocy (JAI) is a rare disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance. It belongs to the so called ceroid lipofuscinoses and the central nervous system is the largest organ. Only very few reports refer to the accumulation of lipopigment in the heart of JAI patients. This study describes the morphology of the heart from all 13 patients with JAI in Denmark who died within a seven year period; electrocardiographic findings are related to structural changes. All compartments of the heart were involved, including the conduction system. Not only very substantial deposition of lipopigment was found in the myocytes, but we have also observed striking amounts of calcium and cholesterol compounds indicating a restrictive type of heart muscle disorder. These structural changes are uniform from case to case. Because of the nature of the disease only rather poor information of the cardiac state is available in JAI patients. 11 patients showed some cardiac enlargement. In 6 patients abnormal P-waves were recorded in the ECG suggesting increased atrial and ventricular diastolic pressure. 2 patients had bradycardia, probably due to sinus node involvement, and one patient developed complete right bundle branch block. However, in the 4 patients in whom the cardiac conduction system could be examined histologically no evidence of disturbance of cardiac impulse formation and conduction was seen in the few standard ECG strips available in spite of extensive deposition of abnormal material throughout the conduction system. There seems to be a discrepancy between the relatively minor functional disturbances observed and the heavy morphological changes of the entire heart. This aspect, however, may well be altered by an intensified clinical observation and examination of JAI patients.
PubMed ID
7315333 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular disease and environmental pollutants: the Arctic aspect.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3543
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1996;55 Suppl 1:25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
P. Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology Section for Research in Greenland Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1996;55 Suppl 1:25-31
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Energy intake
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Food Contamination
Food Habits
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Meat - statistics & numerical data
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Environmental pollution in the Arctic is due to long range transport from lower latitudes or to local industrial activities. Since the latter are not different from point source exposure in the rest of the world the paper focuses on the former aspect which is the main type of environmental pollution in the western Arctic. The environmental pollutants of major significance are heavy metals (mercury, cadmium, lead) and persistent organic pollutants (PCB's, pesticides) and the main exposure is through the traditional diet of sea mammals (mercury, cadmium, persistent organic pollutants) and through smoking (cadmium). There is rather strong evidence that lead is a (weak) risk factor for high blood pressure even at low levels of exposure. Apart from lead there is little evidence that the above mentioned pollutants are significantly related to cardiovascular diseases. Since the pollutants, however, are found in the traditional diet together with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, and selenium which are believed to promote cardiovascular health there is an indirect link between the pollutants and cardiovascular disease. This becomes relevant when dietary guidelines are developed for arctic populations. Epidemiological evidence from Greenland relevant for this discussion is presented, i.e. i) findings from a countrywide interview survey on dietary habits which show that sea mammals are widely consumed and appreciated for health and other reasons and that there is virtually no fear of pollution, and ii) mortality results which do not support the hypothesis that the low rate of ischemic heart disease in Inuit is due to their traditional diet.
PubMed ID
8871683 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk factors in Inuit of Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3516
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;26(6):1182-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
P. Bjerregaard
G. Mulvad
H S Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;26(6):1182-90
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood pressure
Cholesterol - blood
Diet
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Inuits
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - ethnology - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mortality from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and prevalence of coronary arteriosclerosis are low in Inuit of Greenland (Greenlanders). Aetiological considerations have so far focused mostly on diet and blood lipids. The present study is a comprehensive analysis of behavioural, clinical and serological cardiovascular risk factors for IHD in Greenlanders. METHODS: An interview survey from West Greenland (n = 1436) was supplemented with clinical measurements and blood sampling in selected towns and villages (n = 264). RESULTS: The average consumption of marine mammals and fish was 28 meals per month. In Greenland 14% of males and 30% of females were physically inactive compared with 14% and 17% in the general population of Denmark; 79% were current smokers and 22% smoked 15+ cigarettes per day compared with 42% and 21% in Denmark. High density lipoprotein (HDL) concentration was 1.6 mmol/l in Greenland (1.1 in Denmark) and triglyceride concentration 1.0 mmol/l (1.5). Obesity, blood pressure and total cholesterol were similar in Greenland and Denmark. There were significant differences between Greenlanders with a predominantly traditional childhood and those with a more westernized childhood with regard to diet, physical activity (in women) and blood lipids. CONCLUSIONS: In spite of an increased westernization of the Greenlanders' lifestyle and a high prevalence of several cardiovascular risk factors, mortality from IHD is still low. The change in risk factor patterns is, however, recent and an increased IHD mortality is still to be expected. Preventive measures should be initiated to reduce risk factors but they must take into consideration possible negative consequences of e.g. traditional outdoor activities and the consumption of marine mammals.
PubMed ID
9447397 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1988 Jul;47(3):105-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1988
Author
P. Bjerregaard
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1988 Jul;47(3):105-23
Date
Jul-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Female
Greenland
Humans
Male
Registries
PubMed ID
3166650 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995;54 Suppl 1:11-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
P. Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Section for Research in Greenland, Copenhagen.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995;54 Suppl 1:11-4
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
The high infant and child mortality in Greenland covers significant differences among geographic regions. In the capital, Nuuk, 14 of 1000 live born children die before their first birthday, in the remote communities of northern and eastern Greenland the figure is 45. An independently higher mortality risk has also been demonstrated in children of mothers with alcohol problems, frequent admissions to hospital, and various other characteristics. A substantial proportion of infant and child deaths are potentially avoidable, either through improved health services or through action at community level. Based on the results of a research project certain concrete actions have been proposed and adopted by the health authorities.
PubMed ID
7639895 View in PubMed
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66 records – page 1 of 7.