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9 records – page 1 of 1.

A 15-month evaluation of the effects of repeated subgingival minocycline in chronic adult periodontitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201582
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
D. van Steenberghe
B. Rosling
P O Söder
R G Landry
U. van der Velden
M F Timmerman
E F McCarthy
G. Vandenhoven
C. Wouters
M. Wilson
J. Matthews
H N Newman
Author Affiliation
Catholic University, Leuven, Belgium.
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans - drug effects
Analysis of Variance
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Campylobacter - drug effects
Canada
Chronic Disease
Colony Count, Microbial
Dental Plaque Index
Dental Scaling
Double-Blind Method
Eikenella corrodens - drug effects
Europe
Female
Fusobacterium nucleatum - drug effects
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Minocycline - administration & dosage
Ointments
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - drug therapy - microbiology
Periodontitis - drug therapy - microbiology
Porphyromonas gingivalis - drug effects
Prevotella intermedia - drug effects
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
Treponema - drug effects
Abstract
A double-blind, randomized, parallel, comparative study was designed to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of subgingivally administered minocycline ointment versus a vehicle control.
One hundred four patients (104) with moderate to severe adult periodontitis (34 to 64 years of age; mean 46 years) were enrolled in the study. Following scaling and root planing, patients were randomized to receive either 2% minocycline ointment or a matched vehicle control. Study medication was administered directly into the periodontal pocket with a specially designed, graduated, disposable applicator at baseline; week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12. Scaling and root planing was repeated at months 6 and 12. Standard clinical variables (including probing depth and attachment level) were evaluated at baseline and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15. Microbiological sampling using DNA probes was done at baseline; at week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15.
Both treatment groups showed significant and clinically relevant reductions in the numbers of each of the 7 microorganisms measured during the entire 15-month study period. When differences were detected, sites treated with minocycline ointment always produced statistically significantly greater reductions than sites which received the vehicle control. For initial pockets > or =5 mm, a mean reduction in probing depth of 1.9 mm was seen in the test sites, versus 1.2 mm in the control sites. Sites with a baseline probing depth > or =7 mm and bleeding index >2 showed an average of 2.5 mm reduction with minocycline versus 1.5 mm with the vehicle. Gains in attachment (0.9 mm and 1.1 mm) were observed in minocycline-treated sites, with baseline probing depth > or =5 mm and > or =7 mm, respectively, compared with 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm gain at control sites. Subgingival administration of minocycline ointment was well tolerated.
Overall, the results demonstrate that repeated subgingival administration of minocycline ointment in the treatment of adult periodontitis is safe and leads to significant adjunctive improvement after subgingival instrumentation in both clinical and microbiologic variables over a 15-month period.
PubMed ID
10397521 View in PubMed
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Clinical characteristics of destructive periodontitis in a risk group of Swedish urban adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67728
Source
Swed Dent J. 1995;19(1-2):9-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
B. Söder
L J Jin
P O Söder
S. Wikner
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Oral Sciences, School of Dentistry, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1995;19(1-2):9-15
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Plaque - epidemiology
Female
Gingivitis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Oral Hygiene Index
Periodontal Index
Periodontitis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An initial screening investigation of 1681 Swedish urban adults aged 31-40 years with untreated periodontitis showed that 17.2% (289) had at least one site with probing depth > or = 5 mm. The 289 subjects were offered a complete clinical examination and treatment. 144 subjects, 85 men and 59 women, agreed to participate and 145 were non-responding subjects and used as a drop out sample. The results from the screening data showed that the attendants had poorer oral hygiene status and more severe periodontitis than the drop out subjects. The present report describes clinical data of this representative sample with adult periodontitis. Clinical indices were recorded and bone height (BH%) for all teeth was measured with a computer digitizing system. In the 144 attendants, Plaque Index was > 1 in 56.2%, Calculus Index was > 1 in 57.0%, Gingival Index was > 1 in 97.2% and bleeding on probing was found in 89.1% of the sites. 11.1% of the subjects had 1-3 teeth with probing depth > or = 5 mm, 59.0% 4-10 teeth, 25.7% 11-20 teeth and 4.2% > 20 teeth. 47.9% of the subjects had mean BH% less than 80. 45.1% of the subjects had at least one site with an intrabony defect, of which 20% had 3-4 sites and 27.7% > or = 5 sites. It is concluded that advanced generalized periodontitis exists in a limited number of 31-40 year-olds in Sweden. Specific risk factors may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.
PubMed ID
7597634 View in PubMed
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A computerized system to measure interproximal alveolar bone levels in epidemiologic, radiographic investigations. II. Intra- and inter-examiner variation study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233549
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1988 Feb;46(1):33-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
Author
F R Wouters
S. Lavstedt
L. Frithiof
P O Söder
L. Helldén
L. Salonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1988 Feb;46(1):33-9
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alveolar Process - radiography
Cephalometry - methods
Cross-Sectional Studies
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted - methods
Periodontitis - radiography
Sweden
Tooth - anatomy & histology - radiography
Tooth Root - anatomy & histology - radiography
Abstract
The study was aimed at analyzing intra- and inter-examiner variations in computerized measurement and in non-measurability of alveolar bone level in a cross-sectional, epidemiologic material. At each interproximal tooth surface, alveolar bone height in percentage of root length (B/R) and tooth length (B/T) were determined twice by one examiner and once by a second examiner from x5-magnified periapical radiographs. The overall intra- and inter-examiner variations in measurement were 2.85% and 3.84% of root length and 1.97% and 2.82% of tooth length, respectively. The variations were different for different tooth groups and for different degrees of severity of marginal periodontitis. The overall proportions of non-measurable tooth surfaces varied with examiner from 32% to 39% and from 43% to 48% of the available interproximal tooth surfaces for B/R and B/T, respectively. With regard to the level of reliability, the computerized method reported is appropriate to cross-sectional, epidemiologic investigations from radiographs.
PubMed ID
3260061 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with salivary buffering capacity in young adults in Stockholm, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52821
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1994 Feb;102(1):50-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
S. Wikner
P O Söder
Author Affiliation
Institute of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1994 Feb;102(1):50-3
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Buffers
Contraceptives, Oral - pharmacology
Dietary Carbohydrates - pharmacology
Dietary Proteins - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Male
Regression Analysis
Saliva - chemistry - physiology - secretion
Secretory Rate
Smoking - physiopathology
Abstract
The buffering capacity and flow rate of stimulated whole saliva were assessed in 150 persons, 20-24 yr of age. The associations were assessed between the buffer value and the flow rate, some dietary factors, tobacco habits, use of oral contraceptives, and some demographic variables. The results demonstrate that a low flow rate may predict a low buffer value but not a high value. Flow rate accounted for the largest part of the buffering variation but morning and afternoon saliva sampling, female gender, food consumption between meals, and smoking seem to have contributed to low buffering values. Snuff-taking habits, oral contraceptives, and protein consumption between meals were not associated with the buffering capacity.
PubMed ID
8153580 View in PubMed
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Periodontal status in an urban adult population in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67754
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1994 Apr;22(2):106-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
P O Söder
L J Jin
B. Söder
S. Wikner
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1994 Apr;22(2):106-11
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Humans
Male
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Periodontal Index
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
The purpose was to describe the current periodontal status in a Swedish urban population aged 31-40 yr. 1681 individuals, 840 men and 841 women, participated in the study. 68.5% of the subjects had low amount of plaque, 82.8% low level of calculus and 28.9% healthy gingiva or mild gingivitis. 82.8% of the subjects had no pockets with probing depth (PD) > or = 5 mm. 4.9% of the subjects had one tooth with PD > or = 5 mm, 6.7% 2-5 teeth, 2.4% 6-9 teeth and 3.2% > or = 10 teeth with pockets. 55.8% of the subjects had no missing teeth, third molars excluded. 16.5% had one tooth missing, 23.8% 2-5 teeth, 2.7% 6-9 teeth and 1.2% > or = 10 teeth. 8.6% of the subjects had at least one front tooth missing, 28.7% one premolar and 24.1% one molar missing. Men had significantly higher scores than women for plaque (DI-S), calculus (CI-S), gingivitis (GI-M), and number and percent of remaining teeth with PD > or = 5 mm. Smokers had significantly higher scores than non-smokers for DI-S, CI-S, GI-M, number and percent of remaining teeth with PD > or = 5 mm, and number of missing teeth. The individuals who visited the dentist every year had better oral hygiene and gingival status than those who attended for > 3 yr. The multiple regression analysis showed that calculus (P = 0.0001) smoking (P = 0.001), and dental visits (P = 0.0284) were significantly correlated to the number of teeth with PD > or = 5 mm.
PubMed ID
8205774 View in PubMed
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Periodontitis and premature death: a 16-year longitudinal study in a Swedish urban population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163097
Source
J Periodontal Res. 2007 Aug;42(4):361-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
B. Söder
L J Jin
B. Klinge
P-O Söder
Author Affiliation
Institute of Odontology, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. birgitta.soder@ki.se
Source
J Periodontal Res. 2007 Aug;42(4):361-6
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Dental Plaque - mortality
Digestive System Diseases - mortality
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Male
Molar
Neoplasms - mortality
Periodontitis - mortality
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Growing experimental evidence implicates chronic inflammation/infection due to periodontal diseases as a risk factor for death. The objective was to evaluate the role of periodontitis in premature death in a prospective study.
The causes of death in 3273 randomly-selected subjects, aged 30-40 years, from 1985 to 2001 were registered. At baseline, 1676 individuals underwent a clinical oral examination (Group A) and 1597 did not (Group B). Mortality and causes of death from 1985 to 2001 were recorded according to ICD-9-10.
In Groups A (clinically examined group) and B, a total of 110 subjects had died: 40 subjects in Group A, and 70 in Group B. In Group A significant differences were present at baseline between survivors and persons who later died, with respect to dental plaque, calculus, gingival inflammation and number of missing molars in subjects with periodontitis (p
PubMed ID
17559634 View in PubMed
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The relation between tooth eruption and alveolar crest height in a human skeletal sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215769
Source
Arch Oral Biol. 1995 Mar;40(3):175-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
T M Varrela
K. Paunio
F R Wouters
J. Tiekso
P O Söder
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Institute of Dentistry, Finland.
Source
Arch Oral Biol. 1995 Mar;40(3):175-80
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Determination by Teeth
Alveolar Process - physiopathology
Analysis of Variance
Cephalometry
Child
Female
Finland
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Statistics, nonparametric
Tooth Abrasion - history - physiopathology
Tooth Eruption
Vertical Dimension
Abstract
It is commonly assumed that alveolar crest height increases with continuing tooth eruption unless affected by marginal inflammation. To test this hypothesis, the relation between eruption and alveolar crest height was examined in skulls from a sample consisting of the remains of 244 individuals from the late medieval period. The mandibular first and second molars and second premolars were analysed. The age of the skulls was determined on the basis of dental development and molar attrition. Radiographs were taken and points representing the levels of the inferior dental canal (IDC), root apices (AP), alveolar crest (AC), cementum-enamel junction (CEJ) and occlusal surface were determined on the radiographs. The level of the IDC was used as a reference not changing with age. The distances between the points were measured with a help of a computer-digitizer system. Variable IDC-AP increased with age, indicating continuous eruption of the teeth. The distance between AC and CEJ also increased while the distance between IDC and AC remained constant, showing that the alveolar crest height did not increase accordingly. The lack of inflammatory changes on the alveolar bone surface suggests that occlusal attrition may be compensated for by continuous eruption without bone growth in the alveolar margin.
PubMed ID
7605245 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.