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Candidate genes for COPD in two large data sets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142737
Source
Eur Respir J. 2011 Feb;37(2):255-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
P S Bakke
G. Zhu
A. Gulsvik
X. Kong
A G N Agusti
P M A Calverley
C F Donner
R D Levy
B J Make
P D Paré
S I Rennard
J. Vestbo
E F M Wouters
W. Anderson
D A Lomas
E K Silverman
S G Pillai
Author Affiliation
Dept of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. per.bakke@med.uib.no
Source
Eur Respir J. 2011 Feb;37(2):255-63
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Female
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Polymorphism, Genetic
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - genetics
Respiratory Function Tests - statistics & numerical data
STAT1 Transcription Factor - genetics
Sirtuin 2 - genetics
Smoking - epidemiology
Vitamin D-Binding Protein - genetics
Abstract
Lack of reproducibility of findings has been a criticism of genetic association studies on complex diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We selected 257 polymorphisms of 16 genes with reported or potential relationships to COPD and genotyped these variants in a case-control study that included 953 COPD cases and 956 control subjects. We explored the association of these polymorphisms to three COPD phenotypes: a COPD binary phenotype and two quantitative traits (post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) % predicted and FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC)). The polymorphisms significantly associated to these phenotypes in this first study were tested in a second, family-based study that included 635 pedigrees with 1,910 individuals. Significant associations to the binary COPD phenotype in both populations were seen for STAT1 (rs13010343) and NFKBIB/SIRT2 (rs2241704) (p
PubMed ID
20562129 View in PubMed
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A novel study design to investigate the early-life origins of asthma in children (SAGE study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151176
Source
Allergy. 2009 Aug;64(8):1185-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
A L Kozyrskyj
K T HayGlass
A J Sandford
P D Paré
M. Chan-Yeung
A B Becker
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
Allergy. 2009 Aug;64(8):1185-93
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Cohort Studies
Humans
Manitoba - epidemiology
Medical Records
Records as Topic
Research Design
Risk factors
Abstract
This is a description of the Study of Asthma, Genes and the Environment (SAGE), a novel birth cohort created from provincial healthcare administrative records. It is a general population-based cohort, composed of children at high and low risk for asthma, living in urban and rural environments in Manitoba, Canada. The SAGE study captures the complete longitudinal healthcare records of children born in 1995 and contains detailed information on early-life exposures, such as antibiotic utilization and immunization, in relationship to the development of asthma. Nested within the birth cohort is a case-control study, which was created to collect information on home environmental exposures from detailed surveys and home dust sampling, to confirm asthma status in children and use this data to validate healthcare database measures of asthma, to determine differences in immune system responsiveness to innate and adaptive immune stimuli in asthma, to genotype children for genes likely associated with the development of asthma and to study the epigenetic regulation of pre-established protective vs allergic immune responses. The SAGE study is a multidisciplinary collaboration of researchers from pediatric allergy, population health, immunology, and genetic and environmental epidemiology. As such, it serves as a fertile, interdisciplinary training ground for graduate students, and postdoctoral and clinician fellows.
PubMed ID
19416140 View in PubMed
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