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Parental mental health after the accidental death of a son during military service: 23-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128303
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2012 Jan;200(1):63-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Pål Kristensen
Trond Heir
Pål H Herlofsen
Øyvind Langsrud
Lars Weisæth
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, University of Oslo, Kirkeveien 166, Oslo, Norway. Pal.Kristensen@nkvts.unirand.no
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2012 Jan;200(1):63-8
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Avalanches - mortality
Death
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Fathers - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Grief
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Military Medicine - methods
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Nuclear Family
Prospective Studies
Self Report
Abstract
We prospectively studied parental mental health after suddenly losing a son in a military training accident. Parents (N = 32) were interviewed at 1, 2 and 23 years after the death of their son. The General Health Questionnaire and Expanded Texas Inventory of Grief were self-reported at 1, 2, 5, and 23 years; the Inventory of Complicated Grief was self-reported at 23 years. We observed a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders at 1- and 2-year follow-ups (57% and 45%, respectively), particularly major depression (43% and 31%, respectively). Only one mental disorder was diagnosed at the 23-year follow-up. Grief and psychological distress were highest at 1- and 2-year follow-ups. Spouses exhibited a high concordance of psychological distress. Mothers reported more intense grief reactions than did fathers. The loss of a son during military service may have a substantial impact on parental mental health particularly during the first 2 years after death. Spouses' grief can be interrelated and may contribute to their psychological distress.
PubMed ID
22210364 View in PubMed
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