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Alexithymia and life satisfaction in primary healthcare patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159882
Source
Psychosomatics. 2007 Nov-Dec;48(6):523-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Aino K Mattila
Outi Poutanen
Anna-Maija Koivisto
Raimo K R Salokangas
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, FIN-33014, Tampere, Finland. aino.mattila@uta.fi
Source
Psychosomatics. 2007 Nov-Dec;48(6):523-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Primary Health Care - utilization
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Self-Assessment
Sickness Impact Profile
Abstract
The relationship between life satisfaction and alexithymia was studied in a sample of 229 patients as a part of a naturalistic follow-up study of depression in Finnish primary health care. The measures were the abbreviated Life Satisfaction Scale and the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale. Depression was assessed by telephone with the short form of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Of all subjects, 19.2% were alexithymic, and 9.2% were depressed. Alexithymia was negatively associated with life satisfaction even when depression and other confounding factors were controlled for. Alexithymia is a risk factor for life dissatisfaction in primary-care patients.
PubMed ID
18071100 View in PubMed
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Applicability of the DEPS Depression Scale: assessing format and individual items in subgroups of patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144705
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;64(6):384-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Outi Poutanen
Anna-Maija Koivisto
Raimo K R Salokangas
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, and Medical School, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. outi.poutanen@uta.fi
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;64(6):384-90
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - psychology
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Abstract
The role of questionnaires is important in improving the recognition of major depression.
Our aims were: 1) to compare the differences of structure between the Depression Scale (DEPS) and other instruments, and 2) to study whether the DEPS items function in the same way with patients grouped by gender, by age or by education, at the same time taking into account the level of depression.
The item topics of the DEPS and five other self-rating questionnaires (BDI-II, CES-D, HADS-D, PHQ-9, SCL-90-D), an interviewer rating scale (HAMD-17) and two diagnostic interviews for depression (ICD-10, DSM-IV) were listed in a table. The format of the questionnaires and the rating scale were compared. Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis using empirical material (n=1522) and logistic regression models was done to predict DEPS item responses across dichotomous categories for gender, age and education.
The DEPS scale items covered essential symptoms of depression. Of the instruments assessed, the DEPS seemed the most simple. DIF analyses with the DEPS scale revealed some socio-demographic variation in which symptoms were endorsed after matching for DEPS sum score. Clinically the DEPS has good applicability and accuracy for screening depression in working aged primary care patients.
PubMed ID
20331409 View in PubMed
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Catechol-O-methyltransferase val108/158met genotype, major depressive disorder and response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in major depressive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146093
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2010 Mar 30;176(1):85-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-2010
Author
Ari Illi
Eija Setälä-Soikkeli
Olli Kampman
Merja Viikki
Timo Nuolivirta
Outi Poutanen
Heini Huhtala
Nina Mononen
Terho Lehtimäki
Esa Leinonen
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Medical School, Tampere, Finland. ari.illi@uta.fi
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2010 Mar 30;176(1):85-7
Date
Mar-30-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catechol O-Methyltransferase - genetics
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - genetics
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Methionine - genetics
Pharmacogenetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Valine - genetics
Abstract
The functional val108/158met polymorphism of the COMT gene (rs4680) was evaluated in major depressive disorder (MDD), and in the treatment response to antidepressants in MDD. We could not demonstrate any significant difference in the distribution of this COMT single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the treatment response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or between patients with MDD and control subjects.
PubMed ID
20071037 View in PubMed
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Causal and pathoplastic risk factors of depression: findings of the Tampere Depression Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191268
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2002;56(1):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Sergei Pakriev
Outi Poutanen
Raimo K R Salakangas
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2002;56(1):29-32
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - etiology - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Self Concept
Abstract
Factors associated with low self-esteem in non-depressive subjects increase the individual's vulnerability to depression (causal risk factors), and factors correlated to low self-esteem in depressive subjects make the current disorder more severe (pathoplastic risk factors). Using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Depression Scale we intended to explore correlates of low self-esteem in non-depressive and depressive subjects in a random sample of 1643 individuals attending community health centres in Central Finland. According to our study, self-esteem in non-depressive men was affected mainly by poor socioeconomic situation; in depressive men particularly low self-esteem was associated with negative family factors. Low self-esteem in non-depressive women was correlated to poor socioeconomic situation, poor health, and negative family factors. In depressive women self-esteem was affected by poor physical and poor mental health. Taking into consideration causal and pathoplastic risk factors, general practitioners can improve recognition of depression. By paying attention to pathoplastic factors, it is possible to improve detection of more severe forms of depression.
PubMed ID
11869462 View in PubMed
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The Depression Scale (DEPS) as a case finder for depression in various subgroups of primary care patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155278
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2008 Dec;23(8):580-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Outi Poutanen
Anna-Maija Koivisto
Raimo K R Salokangas
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Medical School/Tampere University Hospital, Psychiatric Clinic, P.O. Box 607, Teiskontie 35, Tampere 33014, Finland. outi.poutanen@uta.fi
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2008 Dec;23(8):580-6
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Observer Variation
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Young Adult
Abstract
The quick and simple Depression Scale (DEPS) has been a popular self-rating depression scale in Finland for nearly 15 years. The purpose was to assess the validity of the DEPS in various subgroups of patients.
Primary care patients, aged 18-64, completed a postal questionnaire including the DEPS. Of the 1643 patients all screen-positive subjects and every 10th screen-negative subject were invited for interview (the Present State Examination, PSE). Complete DEPS scores were available for 410 patients. They were grouped by gender, age, marital status, perceived physical health, basic education and the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST) score. Separately for each subgroup, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were done, sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve (AUC), predictive values and likelihood ratios were calculated, and Cronbach's alpha was estimated.
The DEPS was valid in general, but best for patients with basic education longer than 9 years.
The key statistical figures for the DEPS were comparable to the figures for other short self-rating scales.
The DEPS is a valid case finder for primary care patients in the age group 18-64 years, and especially suitable for more highly educated patients. Future studies comparing the DEPS with other simple depression rating scales are needed.
PubMed ID
18778920 View in PubMed
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Gender differences in the symptoms of major depression and in the level of social functioning in public primary care patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149091
Source
Eur J Gen Pract. 2009;15(3):161-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Outi Poutanen
Anna-Maija Koivisto
Aino Mattila
Matti Joukamaa
Raimo K R Salokangas
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Medical School/Tampere University Hospital, Psychiatric Clinic, Finland. outi.poutanen@uta.fi
Source
Eur J Gen Pract. 2009;15(3):161-7
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Depressive Disorder, Major - physiopathology
Female
Finland
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Patients
Primary Health Care
Public Sector
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Social Behavior
Young Adult
Abstract
There are no great differences in the symptom profiles of depression between the genders in observer rating scales, but women self-report more symptoms.
To compare gender differences in symptom profiles of clinical depression in primary care with a short self-report depression scale and an observer-rated scale for social functioning.
A sample of 436 primary care patients aged 18-64 years were screened using the Depression Scale (DEPS) and interviewed using the Present State Examination (PSE). Level of social functioning was also assessed. Sum scores and single items of DEPS were compared between men and women in the groups of both depressive and non-depressive patients,and the interactions between gender and depression were analysed.
Depressive men scored poorer on both instruments. Feeling that everything is an effort and feeling worthless were typical for depressive men. Feeling blue was more typical for non-depressive women than for non-depressive men.
In this sample of primary care patients, there were differences in the symptom profiles of depression between men and women. Depressive men more commonly had serious symptoms than depressive women. Clinically, male depression deserves more attention. The psychosocial profile of public primary care patients in Finland warrants further research.
PubMed ID
19685381 View in PubMed
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Is 5-HTTLPR linked to the response of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in MDD?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142078
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2011 Mar;261(2):95-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Ari Illi
Outi Poutanen
Eija Setälä-Soikkeli
Olli Kampman
Merja Viikki
Heini Huhtala
Nina Mononen
Susann Haraldsson
Pasi A Koivisto
Esa Leinonen
Terho Lehtimäki
Author Affiliation
Medical School, University of Tampere, 33014 Tampere, Finland. ari.illi@uta.fi
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2011 Mar;261(2):95-102
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - genetics
Female
Finland
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pharmacogenetics
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
The role of a functional polymorphism in the transcriptional control region of serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR, SERTPR) has been studied intensively in major depression and in the response to selective serotonin inhibitors (SSRIs) in major depression. The findings have been contradictory, although majority of the studies indicate that the short allele is associated with poor response to SSRIs in major depression. In the present study, we evaluated the association of 5-HTTLPR with treatment response to SSRI medication in Finnish Caucasian MDD patients. A secondary purpose was to study the possible association of this particular polymorphism with major depressive disorder. The aim of the study was to replicate the previous findings in this area. Primary outcomes of the treatment were remission, defined by an exit score of seven or less, and response, defined by a reduction of at least 50% on the MADRS. We had also a control population of 375 healthy blood donors, as a secondary objective was to evaluate the possible association of this particular polymorphism with major depressive disorder. Twenty-nine of the 85 (34.1%) patients reached the remission and 58.8% achieved the predefined response criteria. The l/l genotype of 5-HTTLPR was presented in 51.7% of those patients who achieved remission vs. 25.0% in the non-remitters (P = 0.03). The result remained statistically significant after adjusting for age, gender, medication and MADRS points at the study entry. However, the small sample size limits the reliability of this result.
PubMed ID
20640435 View in PubMed
Less detail

No support for a role for BDNF gene polymorphisms rs11030101 and rs61888800 in major depressive disorder or antidepressant response in patients of Finnish origin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117953
Source
Psychiatr Genet. 2013 Feb;23(1):33-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Ari Illi
Merja Viikki
Outi Poutanen
Eija Setälä-Soikkeli
Timo Nuolivirta
Olli Kampman
Esa Leinonen
Heini Huhtala
Nina Mononen
Terho Lehtimäki
Author Affiliation
Medical School, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Psychiatr Genet. 2013 Feb;23(1):33-5
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Demography
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - genetics
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Abstract
Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is suggested to play a role in the aetiology of major depression and in the antidepressant response in patients with major depression. Several BDNF gene polymorphisms have been investigated in the above-mentioned context. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of two BDNF gene polymorphisms (rs11030101 and rs61888800) in relation to the response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medication in 106 patients of Finnish origin suffering from major depression. The secondary objective was to evaluate the association of these two BDNF polymorphisms in major depression, as we also had a control population of 386 healthy individuals. We did not find any significant differences in the distribution of these two BDNF gene polymorphisms in our patient population in relation to remission or response to treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Also, there were no significant differences between the patients and the controls.
PubMed ID
23250003 View in PubMed
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The performance of diagnostic measures of depression in alexithymic and nonalexithymic subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159520
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2008 Jan-Feb;30(1):77-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Aino K Mattila
Outi Poutanen
Anna-Maija Koivisto
Raimo K R Salokangas
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, FIN-33014 Tampere, Finland. aino.mattila@uta.fi
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2008 Jan-Feb;30(1):77-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms
Depression - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Humans
Interview, Psychological - standards
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires - standards
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine how the outcomes of a structured diagnostic interview for depression are related to the results of a self-report scale in alexithymic and nonalexithymic groups.
Subjects (N=389) recruited from primary care and psychiatric care completed the Depression Scale (DEPS) and the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale. Major depression was diagnosed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview-Short-Form by telephone.
In the group without major depression, the DEPS scores of the alexithymic subjects were significantly higher than those of the nonalexithymic subjects. In the group with major depression, the ideal cutoff points of the DEPS, assessed by receiver operating characteristic analyses, were essentially higher for the alexithymic patients.
Alexithymic subjects without major depression may be rated as depressive if the only criterion is the score on a self-report scale. Furthermore, alexithymic patients may require higher cutoff points in a self-report depression scale.
PubMed ID
18164945 View in PubMed
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The validity of the Depression Scale (DEPS) to assess the severity of depression in primary care patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142802
Source
Fam Pract. 2010 Oct;27(5):527-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Outi Poutanen
Anna-Maija Koivisto
Suvi Kääriä
Raimo K R Salokangas
Author Affiliation
Tampere University Hospital, Psychiatric Clinic, and Medical School, University of Tampere, 33380 Pitkäniemi, Finland. outi.poutanen@uta.fi
Source
Fam Pract. 2010 Oct;27(5):527-34
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - methods
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics, nonparametric
Young Adult
Abstract
There is a need for a simple depression questionnaire also capable of assessing the severity of depression. The Depression Scale (DEPS), has been a very popular self-rating depression questionnaire in Finland for >15 years.
Our aim was to examine whether the DEPS has the ability to differentiate clearly defined levels of depression in primary care patients.
Primary care patients aged 18-64 years completed a postal questionnaire including the DEPS. All screen-positive subjects and every 10th screen-negative subject were invited for interview using the Present State Examination (PSE) as the gold standard. Complete DEPS score was available for 410 patients. Descriptive statistics of the DEPS in the six diagnostic PSE classes were computed. Four of the PSE classes were selected for further analyses of depression severity. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves, sensitivity, specificity, ideal cut-off points and area under the curve were calculated. The ability of the DEPS to differentiate levels of functioning was also evaluated.
The DEPS identified three groups of patients: those with no psychiatric symptoms, those with some depressive symptoms and those with clinical depression. The margins between the levels were thin: the ideal cut-off point for clinical depression was 11/12 and for any level of depression 9/10. The DEPS was also able to differentiate three levels of functioning.
The DEPS has some ability to identify severity of depression in primary care patients. Further research with larger unscreened material is called for.
PubMed ID
20554653 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.