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50bp deletion in the promoter for superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) reduces SOD1 expression in vitro and may correlate with increased age of onset of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156293
Source
Amyotroph Lateral Scler. 2008 Aug;9(4):229-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Wendy J Broom
Matthew Greenway
Ghazaleh Sadri-Vakili
Carsten Russ
Kristen E Auwarter
Kelly E Glajch
Nicolas Dupre
Robert J Swingler
Shaun Purcell
Caroline Hayward
Peter C Sapp
Diane McKenna-Yasek
Paul N Valdmanis
Jean-Pierre Bouchard
Vincent Meininger
Betsy A Hosler
Jonathan D Glass
Meraida Polack
Guy A Rouleau
Jang-Ho J Cha
Orla Hardiman
Robert H Brown
Author Affiliation
Day Neuromuscular Research Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA. wendy.broom@gmail.com
Source
Amyotroph Lateral Scler. 2008 Aug;9(4):229-37
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - enzymology - epidemiology - genetics
Base Sequence
DNA Mutational Analysis
Female
Gene Expression
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Homozygote
Humans
Ireland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Scotland - epidemiology
Sequence Deletion
Sp1 Transcription Factor - metabolism
Superoxide Dismutase - genetics - metabolism
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective was to test the hypothesis that a described association between homozygosity for a 50bp deletion in the SOD1 promoter 1684bp upstream of the SOD1 ATG and an increased age of onset in SALS can be replicated in additional SALS and control sample sets from other populations. Our second objective was to examine whether this deletion attenuates expression of the SOD1 gene. Genomic DNA from more than 1200 SALS cases from Ireland, Scotland, Quebec and the USA was genotyped for the 50bp SOD1 promoter deletion. Reporter gene expression analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies were utilized to examine the functional effects of the deletion. The genetic association for homozygosity for the promoter deletion with an increased age of symptom onset was confirmed overall in this further study (p=0.032), although it was only statistically significant in the Irish subset, and remained highly significant in the combined set of all cohorts (p=0.001). Functional studies demonstrated that this polymorphism reduces the activity of the SOD1 promoter by approximately 50%. In addition we revealed that the transcription factor SP1 binds within the 50bp deletion region in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest the hypothesis that this deletion reduces expression of the SOD1 gene and that levels of the SOD1 protein may modify the phenotype of SALS within selected populations.
PubMed ID
18608091 View in PubMed
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Analysis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as a multistep process: a population-based modelling study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260423
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2014 Nov;13(11):1108-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Ammar Al-Chalabi
Andrea Calvo
Adriano Chio
Shuna Colville
Cathy M Ellis
Orla Hardiman
Mark Heverin
Robin S Howard
Mark H B Huisman
Noa Keren
P Nigel Leigh
Letizia Mazzini
Gabriele Mora
Richard W Orrell
James Rooney
Kirsten M Scott
William J Scotton
Meinie Seelen
Christopher E Shaw
Katie S Sidle
Robert Swingler
Miho Tsuda
Jan H Veldink
Anne E Visser
Leonard H van den Berg
Neil Pearce
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2014 Nov;13(11):1108-13
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Disease Progression
England - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Ireland - epidemiology
Italy - epidemiology
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Population Surveillance - methods
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Scotland - epidemiology
Abstract
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis shares characteristics with some cancers, such as onset being more common in later life, progression usually being rapid, the disease affecting a particular cell type, and showing complex inheritance. We used a model originally applied to cancer epidemiology to investigate the hypothesis that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a multistep process.
We generated incidence data by age and sex from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis population registers in Ireland (registration dates 1995-2012), the Netherlands (2006-12), Italy (1995-2004), Scotland (1989-98), and England (2002-09), and calculated age and sex-adjusted incidences for each register. We regressed the log of age-specific incidence against the log of age with least squares regression. We did the analyses within each register, and also did a combined analysis, adjusting for register.
We identified 6274 cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis from a catchment population of about 34 million people. We noted a linear relationship between log incidence and log age in all five registers: England r(2)=0·95, Ireland r(2)=0·99, Italy r(2)=0·95, the Netherlands r(2)=0·99, and Scotland r(2)=0·97; overall r(2)=0·99. All five registers gave similar estimates of the linear slope ranging from 4·5 to 5·1, with overlapping confidence intervals. The combination of all five registers gave an overall slope of 4·8 (95% CI 4·5-5·0), with similar estimates for men (4·6, 4·3-4·9) and women (5·0, 4·5-5·5).
A linear relationship between the log incidence and log age of onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is consistent with a multistage model of disease. The slope estimate suggests that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a six-step process. Identification of these steps could lead to preventive and therapeutic avenues.
UK Medical Research Council; UK Economic and Social Research Council; Ireland Health Research Board; The Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development (ZonMw); the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Education, University, and Research in Italy; the Motor Neurone Disease Association of England, Wales, and Northern Ireland; and the European Commission (Seventh Framework Programme).
Notes
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Comment In: Lancet Neurol. 2014 Nov;13(11):1067-825300935
PubMed ID
25300936 View in PubMed
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Screening of hypoxia-inducible genes in sporadic ALS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156292
Source
Amyotroph Lateral Scler. 2008 Oct;9(5):299-305
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Simon Cronin
Matthew J Greenway
Peter M Andersen
Orla Hardiman
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Source
Amyotroph Lateral Scler. 2008 Oct;9(5):299-305
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - genetics
Anoxia - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Testing
Genotype
Humans
Ireland
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Ribonuclease, Pancreatic - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sweden
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A - genetics
Abstract
Genetic variations in two hypoxia-inducible angiogenic genes, VEGF and ANG, have been linked with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS). Common variations in these genes may reduce the levels or functioning of their products. VEGF and ANG belong to a larger group of angiogenic genes that are up-regulated under hypoxic conditions. We hypothesized that common genetic variation across other members of this group may also predispose to sporadic ALS. To screen other hypoxia-inducible angiogenic genes for association with SALS, we selected 112 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tgSNPs) that captured the common genetic variation across 16 VEGF-like and eight ANG-like hypoxia-inducible genes. Screening for association was performed in 270 Irish individuals with typical SALS and 272 ethnically matched unrelated controls. SNPs showing association in the Irish phase were genotyped in a replication sample of 281 Swedish sporadic ALS patients and 286 Swedish controls. Seven markers showed association in the Irish. The one modest replication signal observed in the Swedish replication sample, at rs3801158 in the gene inhibin beta A, was for the opposite allele vs. the Irish cohort. We failed to detect association of common variation across 24 candidate hypoxia-inducible angiogenic genes with SALS.
PubMed ID
18608101 View in PubMed
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