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Age as a determinant for dissemination of seasonal and pandemic influenza: an open cohort study of influenza outbreaks in Östergötland County, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126516
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e31746
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Toomas Timpka
Olle Eriksson
Armin Spreco
Elin A Gursky
Magnus Strömgren
Einar Holm
Joakim Ekberg
Orjan Dahlström
Lars Valter
Henrik Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Östergötland County Council, Linköping, Sweden. toomas.timpka@liu.se
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e31746
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Regression Analysis
Seasons
Sweden
Abstract
An understanding of the occurrence and comparative timing of influenza infections in different age groups is important for developing community response and disease control measures. This study uses data from a Scandinavian county (population 427.000) to investigate whether age was a determinant for being diagnosed with influenza 2005-2010 and to examine if age was associated with case timing during outbreaks. Aggregated demographic data were collected from Statistics Sweden, while influenza case data were collected from a county-wide electronic health record system. A logistic regression analysis was used to explore whether case risk was associated with age and outbreak. An analysis of variance was used to explore whether day for diagnosis was also associated to age and outbreak. The clinical case data were validated against case data from microbiological laboratories during one control year. The proportion of cases from the age groups 10-19 (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22384066 View in PubMed
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Application of the 2012 Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics classification criteria to patients in a regional Swedish systemic lupus erythematosus register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269451
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2015;17:3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Anna Ighe
Örjan Dahlström
Thomas Skogh
Christopher Sjöwall
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2015;17:3
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Internationality
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
In 2012, the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) network presented a new set of criteria (SLICC-12) to classify systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The present study is the first to evaluate the performance of SLICC-12 in an adult European study population. Thus, SLICC-12 criteria were applied to confirmed SLE cases in our regional SLE register as well as to individuals with a fair suspicion of systemic autoimmune disease who were referred to rheumatology specialists at our unit.
We included 243 confirmed SLE patients who met the 1982 American College of Rheumatology (ACR-82) classification criteria and/or the Fries 'diagnostic principle' (presence of antinuclear antibodies on at least one occasion plus involvement of at least two defined organ systems) and 55 controls with possible systemic autoimmune disease, including the presence of any SLE-related autoantibody.
SLICC-12 showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 94% (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.90 to 0.96) compared with 90% (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.93) for the updated set of ACR criteria from 1997 (ACR-97), whereas ACR-82 failed to identify every fifth true SLE case. However, the disease specificity of SLICC-12 reached only 74% (95% CI, 0.60 to 0.84) and did not change much when involvement of at least two different organs was required as an indicator of systemic disease. In addition, SLICC-12 misclassified more of the controls compared to ACR-82, ACR-97 and Fries.
Establishing a standard definition of SLE continues to challenge lupus researchers and clinicians. We confirm that SLICC-12 has advantages with regard to diagnostic sensitivity, whereas we found the diagnostic specificity to be surprisingly low. To accomplish increased sensitivity and specificity figures, a combination of criteria sets for clinical SLE studies should be considered.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25575961 View in PubMed
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Community-level football injury epidemiology: traumatic injuries treated at Swedish emergency medical facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297971
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 02 01; 28(1):94-99
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-01-2018
Author
Toomas Timpka
Jan Schyllander
Diana Stark Ekman
Robert Ekman
Örjan Dahlström
Martin Hägglund
Karolina Kristenson
Jenny Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 02 01; 28(1):94-99
Date
02-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Soccer - injuries
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Despite the popularity of the sport, few studies have investigated community-level football injury patterns. This study examines football injuries treated at emergency medical facilities using data from three Swedish counties.
An open-cohort design was used based on residents aged 0-59 years in three Swedish counties (pop. 645 520). Data were collected from emergency medical facilities in the study counties between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2010. Injury frequencies and proportions for age groups stratified by sex were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) and displayed per diagnostic group and body location.
Each year, more than 1/200 person aged 0-59 years sustained at least one injury during football play that required emergency medical care. The highest injury incidence was observed among adolescent boys [2009 injuries per 100 000 population years (95% CI 1914-2108)] and adolescent girls [1413 injuries per 100 000 population years (95% CI 1333-1498)]. For female adolescents and adults, knee joint/ligament injury was the outstanding injury type (20% in ages 13-17 years and 34% in ages 18-29 years). For children aged 7-12 years, more than half of the treated injuries involved the upper extremity; fractures constituted about one-third of these injuries.
One of every 200 residents aged 0-59 years in typical Swedish counties each year sustained a traumatic football injury that required treatment in emergency healthcare. Further research on community-level patterns of overuse syndromes sustained by participation in football play is warranted.
PubMed ID
28510641 View in PubMed
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Designing a decision support system for existing clinical organizational structures: considerations from a rheumatology clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166858
Source
J Med Syst. 2006 Oct;30(5):325-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Orjan Dahlström
Ingrid Thyberg
Ursula Hass
Thomas Skogh
Toomas Timpka
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. orjda@ibv.liu.se
Source
J Med Syst. 2006 Oct;30(5):325-31
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Decision Support Systems, Clinical - organization & administration
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Rheumatology
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to identify the social and organizational requirements for a decision support system (DSS) to be implemented in a clinical rheumatology setting, utilizing data-mining techniques. Field observations and focus group interviews were used for data collection. The decision-making was found to be situated, patient-focused, and long-term in nature. At the same time, the main part of peer-to-peer communication was informal. Patient records were involved in almost every decision. The conclusion is that the main challenges, when introducing a DSS at a rheumatology unit, are adapting the system to informal communication structures and integrating it with patient records. Considering incentive structures, understanding workflow and incorporating awareness are relevant issues when addressing these issues in future studies.
PubMed ID
17068995 View in PubMed
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Disease activity and disability in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA): an 8-year followup of a Swedish early RA project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126417
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012 Aug;64(8):1101-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Eva Hallert
Mathilda Björk
Orjan Dahlström
Thomas Skogh
Ingrid Thyberg
Author Affiliation
Linköping University, Sweden. eva.hallert@liu.se
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012 Aug;64(8):1101-7
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Disability Evaluation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Characteristics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To compare women and men regarding the course of disease activity and disability over 8 years from diagnosis of recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
A total of 149 patients were followed in the Swedish TIRA study (Early Intervention in RA) for 8 years from RA diagnosis (1996-1998) regarding 28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS28), pain (visual analog scale), grip force, Grip Ability Test (GAT), Signals of Functional Impairment (SOFI; hand, upper/lower extremity), walking speed, activity limitation (Health Assessment Questionnaire [HAQ]), and prescribed disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs).
Disease activity pattern over time was similar in women and men, showing improvement during the first year and a stable situation during 6 years thereafter. However, at the 7- and 8-year followup times, deterioration was seen with a less favorable course in women. HAQ score did not differ between sexes at diagnosis, but at all followup times women had significantly higher scores than men. Women also had lower grip force and lower walking speed, but higher upper extremity mobility. DMARD prescription was similar for both sexes. Over 8 years, disease duration, sex, biologic agents, grip force, SOFI hand, and pain intensity together explained 43% of the variation in DAS28, whereas grip force, SOFI lower extremity, GAT, and pain intensity could together explain 55% of variations in HAQ score.
Disease activity was fairly well managed, but disability gradually worsened. Despite similar medication, women had more disability than men. The discrepancy between disease activity and disability indicates unmet needs for multiprofessional interventions to prevent progressing disability, and patients at risk for disability need to be identified early in the process.
PubMed ID
22392813 View in PubMed
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Effect of selenium and Q10 on the cardiac biomarker NT-proBNP.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108388
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Oct;47(5):281-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Peter Johansson
Örjan Dahlström
Ulf Dahlström
Urban Alehagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, County Council of Östergötland , Linköping , Sweden.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Oct;47(5):281-8
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antioxidants - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Double-Blind Method
Female
Heart Diseases - blood - mortality - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Peptide Fragments - blood
Selenium - therapeutic use
Sweden - epidemiology
Ubiquinone - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Abstract
To investigate whether the effect of 48-month usage of coenzyme Q10 and selenium on cardiac function was different for participants with different levels of cardiac wall tension as measured by plasma levels of N-terminal natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) at baseline.
A 48-month randomized double-blind controlled trial in a cohort of community-dwelling elderly (mean age 78 years) was carried out. A total of 443 participants were given coenzyme Q10 combined with selenium, or a placebo. NT-proBNP measured at baseline and 48 months was used to evaluate the cardiac wall tension.
After 48 months, supplementation of coenzyme Q10 and selenium had varying impacts depending on the severity of impairment of cardiac function. Analyses of the responses in the different quintiles of baseline NT-proBNP showed that those with active supplementation, and a plasma level of NT-proBNP in the second to fourth quintiles demonstrated significantly reduced NT-proBNP levels (p = 0.022) as well as cardiovascular mortality after 48 months (p = 0.006).
Long-term supplementation of coenzyme Q10/selenium reduces NT-proBNP levels and cardiovascular mortality in those with baseline NT-proBNP in the second to fourth quintiles indicating those who gain from supplementation are patients with mild to moderate impaired cardiac function.
PubMed ID
23895165 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of Nowcasting for Detecting and Predicting Local Influenza Epidemics, Sweden, 2009-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300056
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2018 10; 24(10):1868-1873
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2018
Author
Armin Spreco
Olle Eriksson
Örjan Dahlström
Benjamin John Cowling
Toomas Timpka
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2018 10; 24(10):1868-1873
Date
10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Epidemics
History, 21st Century
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype
Influenza A virus - classification - genetics
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history - virology
Population Surveillance
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The growing availability of big data in healthcare and public health opens possibilities for infectious disease control in local settings. We prospectively evaluated a method for integrated local detection and prediction (nowcasting) of influenza epidemics over 5 years, using the total population in Östergötland County, Sweden. We used routine health information system data on influenza-diagnosis cases and syndromic telenursing data for July 2009-June 2014 to evaluate epidemic detection, peak-timing prediction, and peak-intensity prediction. Detection performance was satisfactory throughout the period, except for the 2011-12 influenza A(H3N2) season, which followed a season with influenza B and pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus activity. Peak-timing prediction performance was satisfactory for the 4 influenza seasons but not the pandemic. Peak-intensity levels were correctly categorized for the pandemic and 2 of 4 influenza seasons. We recommend using versions of this method modified with regard to local use context for further evaluations using standard methods.
PubMed ID
30226160 View in PubMed
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Functions of nonsuicidal self-injury: exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses in a large community sample of adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278792
Source
Psychol Assess. 2015 Mar;27(1):302-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Örjan Dahlström
Maria Zetterqvist
Lars-Gunnar Lundh
Carl Göran Svedin
Source
Psychol Assess. 2015 Mar;27(1):302-13
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Self Mutilation - diagnosis - epidemiology
Self-Injurious Behavior - diagnosis - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Given that nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is prevalent in adolescents, structured assessment is an essential tool to guide treatment interventions. The Functional Assessment of Self-Mutilation (FASM) is a self-report scale that assesses frequency, methods, and functions of NSSI. FASM was administered to 3,097 Swedish adolescents in a community sample. With the aim of examining the underlying factor structure of the functions of FASM in this sample, the adolescents with NSSI who completed all function items (n = 836) were randomly divided into 2 subsamples for cross-validation purposes. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was followed by a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using the mean and variance adjusted weighted least squares (WLSMV) estimator in the Mplus statistical modeling program. The results of the EFA suggested a 3-factor model (social influence, automatic functions, and nonconformist peer identification), which was supported by a good fit in the CFA. Factors differentiated between social/interpersonal and automatic/intrapersonal functions. Based on learning theory and the specific concepts of negative and positive reinforcement, the nonconformist peer identification factor was then split into 2 factors (peer identification and avoiding demands). The resulting 4-factor model showed an excellent fit. Dividing social functions into separate factors (social influence, peer identification, and avoiding demands) can be helpful in clinical practice, where the assessment of NSSI functions is an important tool with direct implications for treatment.
PubMed ID
25558962 View in PubMed
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Hand pains in women and men in early rheumatoid arthritis, a one year follow-up after diagnosis. The Swedish TIRA project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290008
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2017 02; 39(3):291-300
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2017
Author
Ingrid Thyberg
Örjan Dahlström
Mathilda Björk
Birgitta Stenström
Jo Adams
Author Affiliation
a Department of Rheumatology and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine , Linköping University , Linköping , Sweden.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2017 02; 39(3):291-300
Date
02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - therapeutic use
Arthralgia - drug therapy - physiopathology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - physiopathology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hand Strength
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Sweden
Abstract
Purpose This research analysed general pain intensity, hand pain at rest and hand pain during activity in women and men in early rheumatoid arhtritis (RA). Method Out of the 454 patients that were recruited into the Swedish early RA project "TIRA" the 373 patients (67% women) that remained at 12 months follow-up are reported here. Disease activity 28 joint score (DAS-28), disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire?=?HAQ) and pain (VAS) were recorded at inclusion and after 3 (M3), 6 (M6) and 12 (M12) months. General pain, hand pain during rest, hand pain during test of grip force as assessed by Grippit™, prescribed disease-modifying anti-inflammatory drugs (DMARDs) and hand dominance were recorded. Results DAS-28 and HAQ scores were high at inclusion and improved thereafter in both women and men. There were no significant differences between sexes at inclusion but women had higher DAS-28 and HAQ at all follow-ups. Women were more often prescribed DMARDs than were men. In both women and men all pain types were significantly lower at follow-up compared to at inclusion and women reported higher pain than men at follow-ups. The pain types differed significantly from each other at inclusion into TIRA, general pain was highest and hand pain during rest was lowest. There were no significant differences in hand pain related to hand dominance or between right and left hands. Conclusions Disease activity, disability and pain were high at inclusion and reduced over the first year. Despite more DMARDs prescribed in women than in men, women were more affected than were men. General pain was highest and not surprisingly hand pain during active grip testing was higher than hand pain during rest that was lowest in both sexes. Although our cohort was well controlled, it was evident that hand pain remains a problem. This has implications for rehabilitation and suggests potential ongoing activity limitations that should continue to receive attention from a multi-professional team. Implications for Rehabilitation General pain and hand pain remain a problem in RA despite today's early intervention and effective disease control with new era biologics. The extent of hand pain evidenced in our work gives a more detailed and comprehensive account of pain status. Higher hand pain during active grip testing than that during rest indicates a potential relationship to ongoing activity limitation. Hand pain assessment can help guiding multi-professional interventions directed to reduce hand pain and thereby probably reduce activity limitations.
PubMed ID
26965161 View in PubMed
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Injury patterns in Swedish elite athletics: annual incidence, injury types and risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115099
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2013 Oct;47(15):941-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Jenny Jacobsson
Toomas Timpka
Jan Kowalski
Sverker Nilsson
Joakim Ekberg
Örjan Dahlström
Per A Renström
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, , Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2013 Oct;47(15):941-52
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Musculoskeletal System - injuries
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To estimate the incidence, type and severity of musculoskeletal injuries in youth and adult elite athletics athletes and to explore risk factors for sustaining injuries.
Prospective cohort study conducted during a 52-week period.
Male and female youth and adult athletics athletes ranked in the top 10 in Sweden (n=292).
199 (68%) athletes reported an injury during the study season. Ninety-six per cent of the reported injuries were non-traumatic (associated with overuse). Most injuries (51%) were severe, causing a period of absence from normal training exceeding 3 weeks. Log-rank tests revealed risk differences with regard to athlete category (p=0.046), recent previous injury (>3 weeks time-loss; p=0.039) and training load rank index (TLRI; p=0.019). Cox proportional hazards regression analyses showed that athletes in the third (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.54 to 2.78) and fourth TLRI quartiles (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.16 to 2.74) had almost a twofold increased risk of injury compared with their peers in the first quartile and interaction effects between athlete category and previous injury; youth male athletes with a previous serious injury had more than a fourfold increased risk of injury (HR=4.39; 95% CI 2.20 to 8.77) compared with youth females with no previous injury.
The injury incidence among both youth and adult elite athletics athletes is high. A training load index combing hours and intensity and a history of severe injury the previous year were predictors for injury. Further studies on measures to quantify training content and protocols for safe return to athletics are warranted.
PubMed ID
23543425 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.