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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Costs and quality of life associated with osteoporosis-related fractures in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171980
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2006;17(5):637-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Fredrik Borgström
Niklas Zethraeus
Olof Johnell
Lars Lidgren
Sari Ponzer
Olle Svensson
Peter Abdon
Ewald Ornstein
Karl Lunsjö
Karl Göran Thorngren
Ingemar Sernbo
Clas Rehnberg
Bengt Jönsson
Author Affiliation
Medical Management Centre, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. frederik.b@healtheconomics.se
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2006;17(5):637-50
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Fractures, Bone - economics - etiology
Hip Fractures - economics - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - complications - economics
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Spinal Fractures - economics - etiology
Sweden
Wrist Injuries - economics - etiology
Abstract
This prospective observational data collection study assessed the cost and quality of life related to hip, vertebral and wrist fracture 1 year after the fracture, based on a patient sample consisting of 635 male and female patients surviving a year after fracture. Data regarding resource use and quality of life related to fractures was collected by questionnaires at baseline, 4 months and 12 months. Information was collected by the use of patients' records, register sources and by asking the patient. Quality of life was estimated with the EQ-5D questionnaire. Costs were estimated from a societal perspective, including direct and indirect costs. The mean fracture-related cost the year after a hip, vertebral and wrist fracture were estimated, in euros (), at 14,221, 12,544 and 2,147, respectively [converted from Swedish krona (SEK) at an exchange rate of 9.1268 SEK/]. The mean reduction in quality of life was estimated at 0.17, 0.26 and 0.06 for hip, vertebral and wrist fracture, respectively. Based on the results, the yearly burden of osteoporosis in Sweden could be estimated at 0.5 billion (SEK 4.6 billion). The patient sample for vertebral fracture was fairly small and included a high proportion of fractures leading to hospitalization, but they indicate a higher cost and loss of quality of life related to vertebral fracture than previously perceived.
PubMed ID
16283064 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of fractures in children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97948
Source
Acta Orthop. 2010 Feb;81(1):148-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Erik M Hedström
Olle Svensson
Ulrica Bergström
Piotr Michno
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery and Perioperative Science, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. erik.hedstrom@orthop.umu.se
Source
Acta Orthop. 2010 Feb;81(1):148-53
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Fractures are most common in youth and in the elderly, with differences in incidence over time and between regions. We present the fracture pattern in a population of youths
PubMed ID
20175744 View in PubMed
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Femoral neck fractures in the elderly: functional outcome and quality of life according to EuroQol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71612
Source
Qual Life Res. 2002 Aug;11(5):473-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Jan Tidermark
Niklas Zethraeus
Olle Svensson
Hans Törnkvist
Sari Ponzer
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Karolinska Institute at Stockholm Söder Hospital, Sweden. jan.tidermark@ortoped.sos.sll.se
Source
Qual Life Res. 2002 Aug;11(5):473-81
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comparative Study
Female
Femoral Neck Fractures - physiopathology - surgery
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sickness Impact Profile
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The main purpose of this prospective study was to investigate the functional outcome and health-related quality of life according to EuroQol (EQ-5D) after a femoral neck fracture treated with internal fixation in relatively healthy elderly patients. We also aimed to validate the use of the EQ-5D in routine clinical follow-ups of this group of patients. The inclusion criteria were more than 65 years of age, absence of severe cognitive dysfunction, living independently, and unhindered walking ability preoperatively. The mean follow-up period was 17 months. The rated prefracture EQ-5Dindex scores showed good correspondence with the scores of an age-matched Swedish reference population. The EQ-5Dindex scores decreased from 0.78 before the fracture (based on recall) to 0.59 at 4 months and 0.51 at 17 months after surgery. The decrease was significantly larger among patients with fracture healing complications. There was a good correlation between the EQ-5Dindex scores and other outcome measures such as pain, mobility, independence in ADL and independent living status. The questionnaire response rate (EQ-5D) was 89-100% on different follow-up occasions. The EQ-5D appears to be an easy-to use instrument even for elderly patients with femoral neck fractures. Changes in the quality of life may be useful to identify patients who might benefit from reoperation, i.e. arthroplasty. The EQ-5D also appears to be a relevant clinical end-point in outcome studies.
PubMed ID
12113394 View in PubMed
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[FRAX--model for 10-year fracture risk assessment. Support in the treatment of osteoporosis, according to preliminary Swedish guidelines].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101717
Source
Lakartidningen. 2011 Feb 16-22;108(7):336-9
Publication Type
Article

Getting going together: can clinical teams and managers collaborate to identify problems and initiate improvement?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180239
Source
Qual Manag Health Care. 2004 Apr-Jun;13(2):130-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Johan Thor
Bo Herrlin
Karin Wittlöv
John Skår
Mats Brommels
Olle Svensson
Author Affiliation
Medical Management Center, Karolinska Institute, Nobels väg 15 A, S-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. johan.thor@cmi.ki.se
Source
Qual Manag Health Care. 2004 Apr-Jun;13(2):130-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Decision Making, Organizational
Hip Fractures - surgery
Hospital Administrators
Hospitals, University - standards
Humans
Institutional Management Teams - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Pilot Projects
Problem Solving
Process Assessment (Health Care) - organization & administration
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Sweden
Waiting Lists
Abstract
A clear aim is key for the success of improvement projects, yet many fail already at this stage. We studied how clinical teams and managers at a university hospital in Sweden identified problems and defined aims as they initiated 24 process improvement projects. Categorizing and comparing problems at 3 stages of problem definition, we found that the majority of problems fell into 1 of 3 categories: information issues, poor procedures, and waiting times. Going through these stages, managers and clinical teams prioritized waiting-time problems. We show how managers can ask such teams to quickly identify problems suited for improvement projects through this step-wise, facts-based approach. We conclude that they can add their management perspective when giving specific assignments, to harness the combined benefits of both a bottom-up and a top-down approach to improvement.
PubMed ID
15127692 View in PubMed
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Hip fracture risk and cadmium in erythrocytes: a nested case-control study with prospectively collected samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256969
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2014 Feb;94(2):183-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Johan Nilsson Sommar
Ulrika Pettersson-Kymmer
Thomas Lundh
Olle Svensson
Göran Hallmans
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden, johan.n.sommar@envmed.umu.se.
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2014 Feb;94(2):183-90
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cadmium - analysis - blood
Case-Control Studies
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood
Erythrocytes - chemistry - metabolism
Female
Hip Fractures - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - blood - complications - epidemiology
Osteoporotic Fractures - blood - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Several studies have investigated the relation between bone mass density and cadmium exposure, but only few studies have been performed on fractures and biomarkers of cadmium. This study analyzed the association between hip fracture risk and cadmium in erythrocytes (Ery-Cd). Prospective samples from the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study's biobank were used for 109 individuals who later in life had sustained a low-trauma hip fracture, matched with two controls of the same age and gender. The mean concentration of Ery-Cd (±SD) in case samples was 1.3 ± 1.4 versus 0.9 ± 1.0 µg/L in controls. The odds ratio (OR) was 1.63 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-2.42] for suffering a hip fracture for each microgram per liter increase in Ery-Cd. However, when taking smoking into consideration (never, former, or current), neither Ery-Cd nor smoking showed a statistically significant increase in fracture risk. Using multiple conditional logistic regression with BMI, height, and smoking, the estimated OR for a 1-µg/L increase in Ery-Cd was 1.52 (95% CI 0.77-2.97). Subgroup analysis showed an increased fracture risk among women (OR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.18-3.20, for a 1 µg/L increase), which also remained in the multiple analysis (OR = 3.33, 95% CI 1.29-8.56). This study shows that fracture risk is associated with Ery-Cd. It is, however, not possible to draw firm conclusions on whether cadmium is the causal factor or whether other smoking-related factors cause this association. Subgroup analysis shows that cadmium is a risk factor for hip fracture among women.
PubMed ID
24101229 View in PubMed
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[Honesty and computerized medical records--good safety].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181427
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Jan 22;101(4):313-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-2004
Author
Olle Svensson
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Jan 22;101(4):313-4
Date
Jan-22-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Security
Confidentiality
Humans
Malpractice
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - standards
Sweden
PubMed ID
14979014 View in PubMed
Less detail

Learning helpers: how they facilitated improvement and improved facilitation--lessons from a hospital-wide quality improvement initiative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181437
Source
Qual Manag Health Care. 2004 Jan-Mar;13(1):60-74
Publication Type
Article
Author
Johan Thor
Karin Wittlöv
Bo Herrlin
Mats Brommels
Olle Svensson
John Skår
John Øvretveit
Author Affiliation
Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. johan.thor@cmi.ki.se
Source
Qual Manag Health Care. 2004 Jan-Mar;13(1):60-74
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hospitals, University - standards
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Manuals as Topic
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Culture
Professional Competence
Sweden
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Quality improvement is a leading approach to the difficult yet inevitable task of managing organizational change. The literature suggests that facilitators can help organizations apply improvement principles and tools but it is unclear how facilitators actually do this and how they develop their own skills. Using a case study design we therefore examined how facilitators worked with 93 improvement projects in over 1000 sessions at one Swedish university hospital where systematic process improvement was successfully established over a 5-year period. They facilitated improvement by providing a framework and methods' support for improvement efforts--relying on experiential learning rather than didactic teaching--while letting clinical teams and managers maintain control over the content of improvement projects. They developed extensive experience that they documented and could transfer between teams, so that each team could benefit from lessons learned elsewhere. They improved facilitation through participant feedback and systematic review and reflection regarding their own practice. We suggest that facilitators can help organizations manage change by assuming responsibility for demanding tasks related to improvement work, developing specialized skill and extensive experience regarding improvement, and transferring insights across the organization, while using a learning approach throughout including to their own work.
PubMed ID
14976908 View in PubMed
Less detail

A mutation in the nerve growth factor beta gene (NGFB) causes loss of pain perception.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30506
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2004 Apr 15;13(8):799-805
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2004
Author
Elisabet Einarsdottir
Anna Carlsson
Jan Minde
Göran Toolanen
Olle Svensson
Göran Solders
Gösta Holmgren
Dan Holmberg
Monica Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biosciences, Unit of Clinical and Medical Genetics, Umeå University, SE-90187 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2004 Apr 15;13(8):799-805
Date
Apr-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Cattle
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA Mutational Analysis
Female
Guinea Pigs
Humans
Male
Mice
Nerve Growth Factor - genetics
Pain - genetics
Pain Insensitivity, Congenital - genetics
Pedigree
Protein Structure, Secondary
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Identification of genes associated with pain insensitivity syndromes can increase the understanding of the pathways involved in pain and contribute to the understanding of how sensory pathways relate to other neurological functions. In this report we describe the mapping and identification of the gene responsible for loss of deep pain perception in a large family from northern Sweden. The loss of pain perception in this family is characterized by impairment in the sensing of deep pain and temperature but with normal mental abilities and with most other neurological responses intact. A severe reduction of unmyelinated nerve fibers and a moderate loss of thin myelinated nerve fibers are observed in the patients. Thus the cases in this study fall into the class of patients with loss of pain perception with underlying peripheral neuropathy. Clinically they best fit into HSAN V. Using a model of recessive inheritance we identified an 8.3 Mb region on chromosome 1p11.2-p13.2 shared by the affected individuals in the family. Analysis of functional candidate genes in the disease critical region revealed a mutation in the coding region of the nerve growth-factor beta (NGFB) gene specific for the disease haplotype. This NGF mutation seems to separate the effects of NGF involved in development of central nervous system functions such as mental abilities, from those involved in peripheral pain pathways. This mutation could therefore potentially provide an important tool to study different roles of NGF, and of pain control.
PubMed ID
14976160 View in PubMed
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Trauma recidivism at an emergency department of a Swedish medical center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277142
Source
Inj Epidemiol. 2016 Dec;3(1):22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Fredrik Röding
Marie Lindkvist
Ulrica Bergström
Olle Svensson
Jack Lysholm
Source
Inj Epidemiol. 2016 Dec;3(1):22
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To inform targeted prevention, we studied patterns of trauma recidivism and whether a first injury predicts the risk for a recurrent injury.
In a population-based study of 98,502 adult injury events 1999-2012, at the emergency department of Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, we compared non-recidivists with recidivists in terms of patients' sex, age, type of injury and severity of the injury.
Thirty-six percent of all patients suffered recurrent injuries, which were associated with a higher proportion of inpatient care and more hospital days. Young men and elderly women were at the highest risk for trauma recidivism. At 20 to 24 years, men had a 2.4 (CI 95 % 2.3-2.5) higher risk than women, a 90 years old woman had almost a 10-fold higher risk for another moderate/severe injury than a 20 years old one. A fracture were associated with a hazard ratio of 1.28 (CI 95 % 1.15-1.42) among men younger than 65 years and 1.31 (CI 95 % 1.12-1.54) for men older than 65 years for a subsequent moderate/severe injury. For women younger than 65 years a fracture was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.44 (CI 95 % 1.28-1.62) for a subsequent moderate/severe injury. A sprain carries a higher risk for a new moderate/severe injury for both men and women and in both age groups; the hazard ratio was 1.13 (CI 95 % 1.00-1.26) for men younger than 65 years, 1.42 (CI 95 % 1.01-1.99) for men older than 65 years, 1.19 (CI 95 % 1.05-1.35) for women younger than 65 years and 1.26 (CI 95 % 1.02-1.56) for women older than 65 years. A higher degree of injury severity was associated with a higher risk for a new moderate/severe injury.
Trauma recidivism is common and represents a large proportion of all injured. Age and sex are associated with the risk for new injury. Injury types and severity, also have implications for future injury.
PubMed ID
27747558 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.