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Accidental exposure to electromagnetic fields from the radar of a naval ship: a descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256376
Source
Int Marit Health. 2013;64(4):177-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Bente E Moen
Ole Jacob Møllerløkken
Nils Bull
Gunnhild Oftedal
Kjell Hansson Mild
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Norway; Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway. bente.moen@isf.uib.no.
Source
Int Marit Health. 2013;64(4):177-82
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology
Adult
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Fear
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Naval Medicine
Norway
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Radar
Ships
Young Adult
Abstract
Part of a crew on a Norwegian naval ship was exposed to the radar waves for approximately 7 min from an American destroyer during an incident at sea in August 2012. Information about the exposure was not given by the navy. This is a description of what happened with the crew on board after this event. 14 persons had been on the ship bridge or outside on the deck during the exposure and the rest of the crew had been inside the ship. 27 persons were examined at a hospital 6-8 months after the event, as they had developeda large number of symptoms from different organ systems. They were very worried about all types of possible adverse health effects due to the incident. All were examined by an occupational physician and anophthalmologist, by an interview, clinical examinations and blood tests at the hospital. The interview of the personnel revealed that they had not experienced any major heating during the episode. Their symptoms developed days or weeks after the radar exposure. They had no objective signs of adverse health effects at the examination related to the incident. Long-term health effect from the exposure is highly unlikely. The development of different symptoms after the incident was probably due to the fear of possible health consequences. Better routines for such incidents at sea should be developed to avoid this type of anxiety.
PubMed ID
24408137 View in PubMed
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Musculoskeletal symptoms among hospital cleaners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283079
Source
Arch Environ Occup Health. 2017 Mar 04;72(2):87-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-04-2017
Author
Olivia Edna Lasrado
Ole Jacob Møllerløkken
Bente Elisabeth Moen
Graziella Van den Bergh
Source
Arch Environ Occup Health. 2017 Mar 04;72(2):87-92
Date
Mar-04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Weights and Measures
Female
Housekeeping, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Pain - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Studies have indicated that cleaners are at risk for musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS). In 2001, the Norwegian Labor Inspectorate suggested improvements in cleaners' work environment to reduce MSS. We estimate prevalence of MSS among cleaners in a Norwegian hospital that had implemented improvements to reduce risk of MSS and calculate relative risk of MSS among cleaners compared to a group of office workers. Data were collected from 255 participants. MSS were investigated using the Nordic Questionnaire for Analysis of Musculoskeletal Symptoms. Cleaners reported a significantly higher prevalence of MSS compared to office workers but a lower prevalence compared to similar studies among cleaners in other countries. This may indicate that working conditions in Norway are better than in other countries; further studies are needed to compare MSS and working conditions in different settings.
PubMed ID
26954259 View in PubMed
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Prospective study of pregnancy outcomes after parental cell phone exposure: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270491
Source
Epidemiology. 2015 Jul;26(4):613-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Valborg Baste
Gunnhild Oftedal
Ole Jacob Møllerløkken
Kjell Hansson Mild
Bente E Moen
Source
Epidemiology. 2015 Jul;26(4):613-21
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abruptio Placentae - epidemiology
Adult
Cell Phones - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Female
Head
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Male
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Paternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Perinatal mortality
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Sex ratio
Testis
Young Adult
Abstract
Research about prenatal exposure to electromagnetic fields from cell phones among expectant parents and reproductive outcome is limited. The aim of this article is to investigate the association between pregnancy outcome and parental cell phone exposure in a large prospective study.
The study was based on the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study conducted during the decade 1999-2009. In that study, pregnant women were recruited before a routine ultrasound examination during gestational week 15; they answered a questionnaire at that time and again around gestational week 30. The expectant father was invited to answer a questionnaire during gestational week 15 (2001-2009). The forms contained questions regarding cell phone use. The response rate was 38.7% and the cohort comprised 100,730 singleton births. Pregnancy outcomes were obtained by linkage to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway.
The risk of preeclampsia was slightly lower among women with medium and high cell phone exposure compared with low exposure after adjusting for potential confounders. Fathers with testis exposure when using cell phones had a borderline increased risk of perinatal mortality among offspring and a slightly decreased risk of partner developing preeclampsia during pregnancy compared with no cell phone exposure of head or testis. None of the other pregnancy outcomes was associated with cell phone exposure.
We found no association between maternal prenatal or paternal preconceptional cell phone exposure and any of the studied pregnancy outcomes. The only risk estimate suggesting a potential increased risk was not consistent with other findings.
PubMed ID
25906367 View in PubMed
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