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Adherence, persistence and switch rates for anticholinergic drugs used for overactive bladder in women: data from the Norwegian Prescription Database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113114
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2013 Oct;92(10):1208-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Siri A Mauseth
Svetlana Skurtveit
Olav Spigset
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2013 Oct;92(10):1208-15
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Benzhydryl Compounds - therapeutic use
Benzofurans - therapeutic use
Cholinergic Antagonists - therapeutic use
Cresols - therapeutic use
Databases, Pharmaceutical
Drug Substitution - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Norway
Phenylpropanolamine - therapeutic use
Pyrrolidines - therapeutic use
Quinuclidines - therapeutic use
Tetrahydroisoquinolines - therapeutic use
Urinary Bladder, Overactive - drug therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the pattern of use of anticholinergic drugs for overactive bladder among women in Norway with regard to persistence, adherence and switch rates.
Observational study.
Data from the Norwegian Prescription Database on prescriptions for tolterodine, solifenacin, darifenacin and fesoterodine filled in Norwegian pharmacies from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2010.
Data from the database were analysed at an individual level, and drug persistence, discontinuation rates and switch rates during a follow-up period of 365 days after the first prescription were calculated.
Overall 1-year persistence for new users was 38.0%. Within the same period, a total of 10.3% switched from the index drug to another drug in the same group, whereas 51.7% discontinued without switching. Users of solifenacin and tolterodine were somewhat more persistent than users of darifenacin and fesoterodine. Persistence was lowest (20.9%) in the age group 18-39 years, increased with age and was highest in the age groups 70-79 years and 80 years and above (43.5 and 43.3%, respectively). In total, 31.9% filled only one prescription of the drug and, of these, only one of four women switched to another drug. The proportion who were adherent during treatment was 60.4%.
The discontinuation rate for anticholinergic drugs for overactive bladder in women is high. The reasons why patients stop using them remain obscure but could be related both to a limited clinical effect and an unacceptable adverse effect burden.
PubMed ID
23763552 View in PubMed
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Agranulocytosis and other blood dyscrasias associated with dipyrone (metamizole).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189288
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2002 Jul;58(4):265-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Karin Hedenmalm
Olav Spigset
Author Affiliation
Drug Epidemiology Unit, Medical Products Agency, Box 26, 751 02 Uppsala, Sweden. karin.hedenmalm@mpa.se
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2002 Jul;58(4):265-74
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Agranulocytosis - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Dipyrone - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Hematologic Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Agranulocytosis is a potentially lethal adverse drug reaction of dipyrone (metamizole). According to case-control studies, the frequency is low, approximately one per million users. The aim of the study was to describe the pattern of blood dyscrasias associated with dipyrone, identify possible risk factors and calculate the incidence of agranulocytosis associated with dipyrone.
All spontaneous reports of serious blood dyscrasias associated with dipyrone in Sweden were reviewed. The reports were scrutinised for additional information, including bone marrow findings. The reported incidence of agranulocytosis was estimated from total prescription sales of dipyrone.
The reported incidence of agranulocytosis with dipyrone in Sweden was estimated to be at least 1:1439 (95% confidence interval 1:850, 1:4684) prescriptions. Ninety-two percent of the cases of blood dyscrasias occurred during the first 2 months of treatment. Additional risk factors were identified in 36% of the patients. In a total of five cases of which four were fatal, all three haematopoieses were affected according to bone marrow sample findings. Among the fatal cases, a higher proportion had bi- or tricytopenia than among the non-fatal cases ( P
PubMed ID
12136373 View in PubMed
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Antipsychotics - Postmortem fatal and non-fatal reference concentrations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291362
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2016 Sep; 266:91-101
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Carl Söderberg
Emma Wernvik
Andreas Tillmar
Olav Spigset
Robert Kronstrand
Margareta Reis
Anna K Jönsson
Henrik Druid
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Retzius v. 3, KI Campus Solna, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Forensic Medicine, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Artillerigatan 12, 587 58 Linköping, Sweden. Electronic address: carl.soderberg@ki.se.
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2016 Sep; 266:91-101
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Antipsychotic Agents - blood
Automobile Driving
Autopsy
Drug Monitoring
Forensic Toxicology - methods
Humans
Reference Values
Sweden
Abstract
Making the diagnosis fatal intoxication is a challenging task for the forensic pathologist and toxicologist, particularly when the cases involve substances where reference information is scarce or not at all available. This study presents postmortem femoral blood concentrations for 24 antipsychotic substances, based on samples collected and analyzed from 4949 autopsy cases in Sweden during 1992-2010. In addition our study provides information about the prevalence of different antipsychotics in accidental, suicidal, homicidal and uncertain deaths. The data have been selected and evaluated according to strict inclusion and exclusion criteria as well as a manual, multi-reviewer, case-by-case evaluation. The reference information is subdivided into intoxications by one specific substance only (group A, n=259), multi-substance intoxications (group B, n=614) and postmortem controls, consisting of deaths not involving incapacitation by substances (group C, n=507). Moreover, the results are compared with data based on therapeutic drug monitoring, and data collected from driving under the influence cases. Median concentrations in group A were significantly higher than in group C for all substances evaluated. For 17 of 24 substances, the median concentrations in group B were significantly higher than in group C. In general, the therapeutic drug monitoring and driving under the influence concentrations were similar to, or lower than, the concentrations in group C.
PubMed ID
27236367 View in PubMed
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Association of Folic Acid Supplementation During Pregnancy With the Risk of Autistic Traits in Children Exposed to Antiepileptic Drugs In Utero.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303235
Source
JAMA Neurol. 2018 02 01; 75(2):160-168
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-01-2018
Author
Marte Bjørk
Bettina Riedel
Olav Spigset
Gyri Veiby
Eivind Kolstad
Anne Kjersti Daltveit
Nils Erik Gilhus
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
JAMA Neurol. 2018 02 01; 75(2):160-168
Date
02-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anticonvulsants - adverse effects
Autistic Disorder - etiology - prevention & control
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements
Epilepsy - drug therapy
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Norway
Outcome Assessment, Health Care
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - physiopathology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vitamin B Complex - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Strategies to prevent autism in children exposed to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy are important.
To explore whether folic acid supplementation and folate status in pregnancy are associated with reduced risk of autistic traits owing to in utero AED exposure.
The population-based, prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study approached Norwegian-speaking women attending routine ultrasonographic examinations from June 1999 through December 31, 2008 (163?844 of 277?702 women refused). No exclusion criteria were applied beyond language. Questionnaires during and after pregnancy, analysis of blood samples, and linkage to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway were performed. Children aged 18 to 36 months of women with available information on use of AEDs and of folic acid supplementation (n?=?104?946) were included in the analysis from March 1, 2016, through June 13, 2017.
Maternal folic acid supplementation 4 weeks before to 12 weeks after conception. Plasma folate concentration was analyzed at gestational weeks 17 to 19.
Autistic traits were evaluated using the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers and Social Communication Questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) for autistic traits in children by maternal use vs nonuse of folic acid supplements were adjusted for maternal health and socioeconomic factors. Folate concentrations and folic acid doses were associated with the degree of autistic traits.
The overall mean (SD) age of the 104?946 mothers of participating children was 29.8 (4.6) years, with complete information available for analysis in 103 868. Mean (SD) age of women with epilepsy who received AED treatment was 29.4 (4.9); women with epilepsy who did not receive AED treatment, 29.1 (4.9); and without epilepsy, 29.8 (4.6) years. In the 335 children exposed to AEDs, the risk for autistic traits was significantly higher at 18 months of age (adjusted OR [AOR], 5.9; 95% CI, 2.2-15.8) and 36 months of age (AOR, 7.9; 95% CI, 2.5-24.9) when their mothers had not used folic acid supplements compared with children of mothers who had used supplements. Among women without epilepsy, the corresponding risks were lower at 18 months of age (AOR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.2-1.4) and 36 months of age (AOR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.5-1.9); among the 389 children of women with untreated epilepsy, the corresponding risks were not significant at 18 months of age (AOR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.4-3.0) and 36 months of age (AOR, 2.5; 95% CI, 0.4-16.6). Degree of autistic traits was inversely associated with maternal plasma folate concentrations (ß?=?-0.3; P?=?.03) and folic acid doses (ß?=?-0.5; P?
Notes
CommentIn: JAMA Neurol. 2018 Feb 1;75(2):151-152 PMID 29279883
ErratumIn: JAMA Neurol. 2018 Apr 1;75(4):518 PMID 29482209
PubMed ID
29279889 View in PubMed
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Association of Prenatal Ibuprofen Exposure with Birth Weight and Gestational Age: A Population-Based Sibling Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284134
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(12):e0166971
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Katerina Nezvalová-Henriksen
Mollie Wood
Olav Spigset
Hedvig Nordeng
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(12):e0166971
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects
Birth Weight - drug effects
Child
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Ibuprofen - adverse effects
Infant, Newborn
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - epidemiology
Propensity Score
Prospective Studies
Siblings
Abstract
Three studies so far have investigated the effect of prenatal non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) exposure on birth weight and gestational age. The aim in this study was to evaluate the association of prenatal ibuprofen with birth weight and gestational age at birth, using a sibling design in an attempt to adjust for the possibility of familial confounding.
Using data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) and the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN), we identified 28 597 siblings, of whom 1080 were prenatally exposed to ibuprofen and 26 824 were not exposed to any NSAID. Random and fixed effects models with propensity score adjustment were used to evaluate the effects of ibuprofen exposure on birth weight and gestational age.
Ibuprofen exposure during the first trimester was associated with a decrease in birth weight of 79 grams (95% confidence interval -133 to -25 grams). In contrast, second and/or third trimester exposure, and duration of exposure had no impact on the effect estimates. We found no association between ibuprofen exposure and gestational age at birth.
Our results suggest that prenatal exposure to ibuprofen during the first trimester is associated with a slight decrease in birth weight. The association does not seem to be attributable to shared genetics and family environment, and could be explained by either exposure to ibuprofen, or to non-shared confounding between pregnancies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27936000 View in PubMed
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Cannabis use and premorbid functioning as predictors of poorer neurocognition in schizophrenia spectrum disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118693
Source
Schizophr Res. 2013 Jan;143(1):84-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
P Andreas Ringen
Ingrid Melle
Akiah O Berg
Ingrid Agartz
Olav Spigset
Carmen Simonsen
Kjetil Sundet
Ole A Andreassen
Author Affiliation
KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, N-0424 Oslo, Norway. p.a.ringen@medisin.uio.no
Source
Schizophr Res. 2013 Jan;143(1):84-9
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attention
Cannabinoids - urine
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Executive Function
Female
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse - complications - epidemiology - psychology - urine
Memory
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychomotor Performance
Regression Analysis
Schizophrenia - complications - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Verbal Learning
Young Adult
Abstract
Evidence of associations between neurocognitive function and cannabis use in schizophrenia is inconclusive. However, direct measures of cannabis intake and premorbid function are rarely explored in this context. We investigated the relation between cannabis use, determined by its presence in urine, and neurocognitive functioning in schizophrenia controlling for the potential bias of premorbid functioning.
Naturalistic study of 364 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder from catchment areas in Oslo, Norway. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between cannabis in urine and measures of neurocognitive functioning, with adjustment for confounders, including premorbid functioning.
Cannabis was detected in the urine of 21 patients, who had significant dysfunction in several neurocognitive domains independent of a current diagnosis of cannabis abuse. However, level of premorbid functioning explained the associations for all measures.
Differences in premorbid functioning may explain apparent differences in neurocognitive function between schizophrenia spectrum patients using cannabis or not. The findings suggest that illness-related traits present early in life can affect both later cannabis use and neurocognition, probably by complex mechanisms.
PubMed ID
23178107 View in PubMed
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Changes in drug disposition of lithium during pregnancy: a retrospective observational study of patient data from two routine therapeutic drug monitoring services in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288044
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 03 01;7(3):e015738
Publication Type
Article
Date
03-01-2017
Author
Andreas Austgulen Westin
Malin Brekke
Espen Molden
Eirik Skogvoll
Marianne Aadal
Olav Spigset
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 03 01;7(3):e015738
Date
03-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antimanic Agents - administration & dosage - blood
Bipolar Disorder - drug therapy
Drug Monitoring
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Lithium Compounds - administration & dosage - blood
Norway
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, Third - blood
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Pregnancy may cause changes in drug disposition, dose requirements and clinical response. For lithium, changes in disposition during pregnancy have so far been explored in a single-dose study on 4 participants only. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of pregnancy on serum levels of lithium in a larger patient material in a naturalistic setting.
A retrospective observational study of patient data from 2 routine therapeutic drug monitoring services in Norway, linked to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway.
Norway, October 1999 to December 2011.
Dose-adjusted drug concentrations of lithium during pregnancy were compared with the women's own baseline (non-pregnant) values, using a linear mixed model.
Overall, coupling 196 726 serum concentration measurements from 54 393 women to the national birth registry identified 25 serum lithium concentration analyses obtained from a total of 14 pregnancies in 13 women, and 63 baseline analyses from the same women. Dose-adjusted serum concentrations in the third trimester were significantly lower than baseline (-34%; CI -44% to -23%, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28249852 View in PubMed
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Discrepancies in drug histories at admission to gastrointestinal surgery, internal medicine and geriatric hospital wards in Central Norway: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292100
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Sep 24; 7(9):e013427
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Sep-24-2017
Author
Janne Kutschera Sund
Olav Sletvold
Trude Cecilie Mellingsæter
Randi Hukari
Torstein Hole
Per Einar Uggen
Petra Thiemann Vadset
Olav Spigset
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Sep 24; 7(9):e013427
Date
Sep-24-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Digestive System Surgical Procedures - methods
Female
Hospital Departments - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, General - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medical History Taking - methods - statistics & numerical data
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Medication Reconciliation - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To compare discrepancies in drug histories among patients acutely admitted to different hospital wards, classify the discrepancies according to their potential clinical impact and identify appropriate selection criteria for patients that should be subject to a detailed drug history at admission.
Cross-sectional study.
Two gastrointestinal surgery wards and one geriatric ward at St Olav's University Hospital in Trondheim and two general internal medicine wards at Ålesund Hospital in Ålesund, Norway.
All patients acutely admitted to these wards during a period of three?months were asked to participate in the study. A total of 168 patients were included. For each patient, drug information available at admission was compared with information from drug lists obtained from the general practitioner and (if applicable) the home care services/the nursing home.
Number of patients with one or more discrepancies in their drug history. Type and clinical impact of the discrepancies found. Selection criteria for patients that should be subject to a detailed drug history.
In total, 83% had at least one discrepancy in their drug history. Omission of a drug accounted for 72% of the discrepancies, whereas a difference in dosing was the cause of the remaining 28%. 9% of the discrepancies had the potential to cause severe harm or discomfort. We found no significant differences in the number of discrepancies between hospital wards, genders, ages or levels of care.
This study demonstrates the importance of collecting drug information from all available sources when a patient is admitted to hospital. As we found no significant differences in discrepancies between subgroups of patients, we suggest that medication reconciliation should be performed for all patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28947434 View in PubMed
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Discrepancies in drug histories at admission to gastrointestinal surgery, internal medicine and geriatric hospital wards in Central Norway: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286047
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Sep 24;7(9):e013427
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-24-2017
Author
Janne Kutschera Sund
Olav Sletvold
Trude Cecilie Mellingsæter
Randi Hukari
Torstein Hole
Per Einar Uggen
Petra Thiemann Vadset
Olav Spigset
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Sep 24;7(9):e013427
Date
Sep-24-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To compare discrepancies in drug histories among patients acutely admitted to different hospital wards, classify the discrepancies according to their potential clinical impact and identify appropriate selection criteria for patients that should be subject to a detailed drug history at admission.
Cross-sectional study.
Two gastrointestinal surgery wards and one geriatric ward at St Olav's University Hospital in Trondheim and two general internal medicine wards at Ålesund Hospital in Ålesund, Norway.
All patients acutely admitted to these wards during a period of three?months were asked to participate in the study. A total of 168 patients were included. For each patient, drug information available at admission was compared with information from drug lists obtained from the general practitioner and (if applicable) the home care services/the nursing home.
Number of patients with one or more discrepancies in their drug history. Type and clinical impact of the discrepancies found. Selection criteria for patients that should be subject to a detailed drug history.
In total, 83% had at least one discrepancy in their drug history. Omission of a drug accounted for 72% of the discrepancies, whereas a difference in dosing was the cause of the remaining 28%. 9% of the discrepancies had the potential to cause severe harm or discomfort. We found no significant differences in the number of discrepancies between hospital wards, genders, ages or levels of care.
This study demonstrates the importance of collecting drug information from all available sources when a patient is admitted to hospital. As we found no significant differences in discrepancies between subgroups of patients, we suggest that medication reconciliation should be performed for all patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28947434 View in PubMed
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[Dosing of digitoxin in clinical practice]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96495
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Jul 1;130(13):1334-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2010
Author
Arne Hønnås
Arne Reimers
Olav Spigset
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for klinisk farmakologi, St. Olavs hospital, 7006 Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Jul 1;130(13):1334-6
Date
Jul-1-2010
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - administration & dosage - blood
Cardiotonic Agents - administration & dosage - blood
Digitoxin - administration & dosage - blood
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In 2007, new Norwegian guidelines suggested that serum concentrations of digitoxin should be in the interval 8 - 15 nmol/l, which is about 50 % lower than previous recommendations. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied trends in dosing and serum concentrations of digitoxin in the period 2000 - 08, based on 13 054 serum samples sent to our laboratory for analysis in that period. RESULTS: The median serum concentration of digitoxin was stable until the end of 2006 (at about 25 nmol/l); then it gradually decreased from 2007 until the end of 2008 (to 19 nmol/l). The mean daily dose decreased from 66 microg to 56 microg in the study period. At a given dose, patients above 85 years of age had serum concentrations that were almost twice as high as those for patients younger than 55 years. This age effect was particularly pronounced from 65 years. INTERPRETATION: Serum concentrations of digitoxin have gradually decreased after 2007, but are often higher than the new reference range. To obtain serum concentrations within the new reference interval, doses at least as low as those currently recommended should be used, particularly in the oldest patients.
PubMed ID
20596112 View in PubMed
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