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A 3-year follow-up study of Swedish youths committed to juvenile institutions: Frequent occurrence of criminality and health care use regardless of drug abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288173
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ola Ståhlberg
Sofia Boman
Christina Robertsson
Nóra Kerekes
Henrik Anckarsäter
Thomas Nilsson
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Crime - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Recurrence
Residential Treatment - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This 3-year follow-up study compares background variables, extent of criminality and criminal recidivism in the form of all court convictions, the use of inpatient care, and number of early deaths in Swedish institutionalized adolescents (N=100) with comorbid substance use disorders (SUD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (n=25) versus those with SUD but no ADHD (n=30), and those without SUD (n=45). In addition it aims to identify whether potential risk factors related to these groups are associated with persistence in violent criminality. Results showed almost no significant differences between the three diagnostic groups, but the SUD plus ADHD group displayed a somewhat more negative outcome with regard to criminality, and the non-SUD group stood out with very few drug related treatment episodes. However, the rate of criminal recidivism was strikingly high in all three groups, and the use of inpatient care as well as the number of untimely deaths recorded in the study population was dramatically increased compared to a age matched general population group. Finally, age at first conviction emerged as the only significant predictor of persistence in violent criminality with an AUC of .69 (CI (95%) .54-.84, p=.02). Regardless of whether SUD, with or without ADHD, is at hand or not, institutionalized adolescents describe a negative course with extensive criminality and frequent episodes of inpatient treatment, and thus requires a more effective treatment than present youth institutions seem to offer today. However, the few differences found between the three groups, do give some support that those with comorbid SUD and ADHD have the worst prognosis with regard to criminality, health, and untimely death, and as such are in need of even more extensive treatment interventions.
PubMed ID
27745884 View in PubMed
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The Autism--Tics, AD/HD and other Comorbidities (A-TAC) telephone interview: convergence with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97863
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 May 4;64(3):218-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-4-2010
Author
Sara Lina Hansson Halleröd
Tomas Larson
Ola Ståhlberg
Eva Carlström
Carina Gillberg
Henrik Anckarsäter
Maria Råstam
Paul Lichtenstein
Christopher Gillberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sege Park 8A, SE-205 02 Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 May 4;64(3):218-24
Date
May-4-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diseases in Twins - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Sweden
Tic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare telephone interview screening for child psychiatric/neuropsychiatric disorders using the inventory of Autism-Tics, Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) and other Comorbidities (A-TAC) with results from the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). BACKGROUND: The A-TAC is a parent telephone interview focusing on autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and co-existing problems, developed for lay interviewers. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A-TAC telephone interviews and CBCL questionnaires were obtained from parents of 106 Swedish twin pairs aged 9 and 12 years. RESULTS: Correlations between A-TAC modules and CBCL scales aimed at measuring similar concepts were generally significant albeit modest, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.30 through 0.55. CONCLUSION: The A-TAC has convergent validity with the CBCL in several problem areas, but the A-TAC also provides more detailed and specific assessments of ASD symptoms and related neuropsychiatric problems.
Notes
RefSource: Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 May 4;64(3):146
PubMed ID
20192892 View in PubMed
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The autism--tics, AD/HD and other comorbidities inventory (A-TAC): further validation of a telephone interview for epidemiological research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98441
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:1
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Tomas Larson
Henrik Anckarsäter
Carina Gillberg
Ola Ståhlberg
Eva Carlström
Björn Kadesjö
Maria Råstam
Paul Lichtenstein
Christopher Gillberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö/Lund, Sweden. Tomas.Larson@med.lu.se
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:1
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Algorithms
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Autistic Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Developmental Disabilities - diagnosis - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods - standards
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Parents - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden - epidemiology
Tic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Reliable, valid, and easy-to-administer instruments to identify possible caseness and to provide proxies for clinical diagnoses are needed in epidemiological research on child and adolescent mental health.The aim of this study is to provide further validity data for a parent telephone interview focused on Autism--Tics, Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), and other Comorbidities (A-TAC), for which reliability and preliminary validation data have been previously reported. METHODS: Parents of 91 children clinically diagnosed at a specialized Child Neuropsychiatric Clinic, 366 control children and 319 children for whom clinical diagnoses had been previously assigned were interviewed by the A-TAC over the phone. Interviewers were blind to clinical information. Different scores from the A-TAC were compared to the diagnostic outcome. RESULTS: Areas under ROC curves for interview scores as predictors of clinical diagnoses were around 0.95 for most disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), tic disorders, developmental coordination disorders (DCD) and learning disorders, indicating excellent screening properties. Screening cut-off scores with sensitivities above 0.90 (0.95 for ASD and AD/HD) were established for most conditions, as well as cut-off scores to identify proxies to clinical diagnoses with specificities above 0.90 (0.95 for ASD and AD/HD). CONCLUSIONS: The previously reported validity of the A-TAC was supported by this larger replication study using broader scales from the A-TAC-items and a larger number of diagnostic categories. Short versions of algorithms worked as well as larger. Different cut-off levels for screening versus identifying proxies for clinical diagnoses are warranted. Data on the validity for mood problems and oppositional defiant/conduct problems are still lacking. Although the A-TAC is principally intended for epidemiological research and general investigations, the instrument may be useful as a tool to collect information in clinical practice as well.
PubMed ID
20055988 View in PubMed
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The Brief Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (BOCS): a self-report scale for OCD and obsessive-compulsive related disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263626
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Nov;68(8):549-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Susanne Bejerot
Gunnar Edman
Henrik Anckarsäter
Gunilla Berglund
Christopher Gillberg
Björn Hofvander
Mats B Humble
Ewa Mörtberg
Maria Råstam
Ola Ståhlberg
Louise Frisén
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Nov;68(8):549-59
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - diagnosis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The Brief Obsessive Compulsive Scale (BOCS), derived from the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and the children's version (CY-BOCS), is a short self-report tool used to aid in the assessment of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). It is widely used throughout child, adolescent and adult psychiatry settings in Sweden but has not been validated up to date.
The aim of the current study was to examine the psychometric properties of the BOCS amongst a psychiatric outpatient population.
The BOCS consists of a 15-item Symptom Checklist including three items (hoarding, dysmorphophobia and self-harm) related to the DSM-5 category "Obsessive-compulsive related disorders", accompanied by a single six-item Severity Scale for obsessions and compulsions combined. It encompasses the revisions made in the Y-BOCS-II severity scale by including obsessive-compulsive free intervals, extent of avoidance and excluding the resistance item. 402 adult psychiatric outpatients with OCD, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder and other psychiatric disorders completed the BOCS.
Principal component factor analysis produced five subscales titled "Symmetry", "Forbidden thoughts", "Contamination", "Magical thoughts" and "Dysmorphic thoughts". The OCD group scored higher than the other diagnostic groups in all subscales (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
24568661 View in PubMed
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Mental health problems in youths committed to juvenile institutions: prevalences and treatment needs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140050
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;19(12):893-903
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Ola Ståhlberg
Henrik Anckarsäter
Thomas Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Forensic Psychiatry, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden. ola.stahlberg@neuro.gu.se
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;19(12):893-903
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent, Institutionalized
Child
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Mental health
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Many international studies show that adolescents in coercive institutional care display high prevalences of mental disorders, especially in the form of disruptive behavior disorders [including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder], anxiety disorders, and mood disorders. High degrees of overlap across mental disorders have also been reported. In addition, institutionalized adolescents are often traumatized. Despite this well-documented psychiatric morbidity, the mental health care needs of detained adolescents are often overlooked. The main objective of this study is to assess prevalences of psychiatric disorders, results of intelligence tests, and previous contacts with child and adolescent psychiatric services among adolescents in institutional care. DSM-IV diagnoses, mental health contacts, substance abuse, neurocognitive abilities, and school performance were registered in 100 adolescents (92 boys, 8 girls) aged 12-19 years (mean age 16.0; SD ± 1.5) consecutively committed to Swedish juvenile institutions between 2004 and 2007. At least one psychiatric disorder was diagnosed in 73% of the subjects: 48% met DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for AD/HD, 17% for an autism spectrum disorder, and 10% for a mental retardation. The collapsed prevalence for psychiatric disorders requiring specialist attention was 63%. Our data indicate that systematic diagnostic procedures are crucial in the treatment planning for institutionalized adolescents. Adequate treatment strategies need to be designed and implemented to meet the extensive mental health care needs of this vulnerable population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20949366 View in PubMed
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The Swedish version of the parent-rated Junior Temperament and Character Inventory (J-TCI).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137026
Source
Psychol Rep. 2010 Dec;107(3):715-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Nóra Kerekes
Sven Brändström
Ola Ståhlberg
Tomas Larson
Eva Carlström
Paul Lichtenstein
Henrik Anckarsäter
Thomas Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Institute for Neuroscience and Physiology, Psychiatry and Neurochemistry Section Forensic Psychiatry, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. nora.kerekes@neuro.gu.se
Source
Psychol Rep. 2010 Dec;107(3):715-25
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Character
Child
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Registries
Sweden
Temperament
Abstract
To evaluate the psychometric characteristics of the Swedish version of the Junior Temperament and Character Inventory (J-TCI), it was sent to parents of 9- and 12-yr.-old twins in Sweden. The final number of responders was 196 parents who rated 92 female and 104 male twin pairs. The inventory of one twin, randomly chosen from each pair, was included in the analyses. Reward Dependence, Persistence, and Cooperativeness were scored higher in girls; Novelty Seeking was higher in the 9-yr.-olds and Persistence in the 12-yr.-olds. Pearson's correlations showed that some dimensions were not statistically independent from each other, even if the covariance was moderate. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was satisfactory for Harm Avoidance, Novelty Seeking, Self-Directedness, and Cooperativeness (.68-.81), while it was lower in those dimensions that had fewer items. The Swedish parent version of the J-TCI shared about the same psychometric characteristics as found in international samples.
PubMed ID
21323129 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.