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5 records – page 1 of 1.

Effects of a school-based smoking prevention program among subgroups of adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21680
Source
Health Educ Res. 1998 Jun;13(2):215-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
O. Jøsendal
L E Aarø
I H Bergh
Author Affiliation
Research Center for Health Promotion, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Health Educ Res. 1998 Jun;13(2):215-24
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Health education
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Norway
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
School Health Services
Smoking - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
In autumn 1995 The Norwegian Cancer Society in cooperation with The Research Center for Health Promotion, University of Bergen started a study of school-based interventions aiming at preventing smoking among pupils in Norwegian secondary schools. The study comprised a nationwide sample of 4441 students at 99 schools (195 classes). This panel of students is followed through annual data collections till they graduate in spring 1997. Written consensus from students and parents was obtained from 95%. Schools were systematically allocated to one of four groups: Group A, control; Group B, intervention, containing classroom program, involvement of parents and teacher courses; Group C, like B, but without teacher courses; Group D, like B, but without parental involvement. Baseline data were collected by questionnaires administered in class in November 1994 and the first follow-up survey was carried out in May 1995. At follow-up the proportion of smokers had increased by 8.3 percentage points in Group A (control) and by 1.9 percentage points in Group B (most extensive intervention). As expected, the recruitment of smokers was higher in Groups C and D than in the ideal intervention, but lower than in the control group. Effects of the most extensive program among subgroups of students were examined by comparing Groups A and B. Students are categorized as high risk or low risk based on scores on scales measuring sensation seeking, physical maturity, antisocial behavior and parental smoking. The effect of the program on recruitment of smokers seems to have been at least as strong or even stronger among 'high-risk' students than among other students.
PubMed ID
10181020 View in PubMed
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[Expectations from a system of personal general practitioners. A questionnaire study among general practitioners in the municipality of Bergen]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72742
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Apr 10;117(9):1316-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-1997
Author
G. Fosse
O. Jøsendal
Author Affiliation
Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Apr 10;117(9):1316-9
Date
Apr-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Family Practice - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Norway
Physicians, Family - psychology
Physicians, Women - psychology
Questionnaires
Workload
Abstract
Four municipalities in Norway have tested out a system of personal general practitioners, where all inhabitants aged 12 or more could choose their personal doctor. The doctor's responsibility, work-load and economy were determined by his/her specified list of patients. Doctors employed in primary health care showed a significant interest in the subject, and the ongoing personal doctor trial. To prepare for possible reorganization to this new system in the municipality of Bergen, a survey was carried out in January 1995 among all 145 general practitioners in Bergen, of whom 70% responded. Data from the survey indicated that a larger share of women than men had low expectations concerning a system of personal general practitioners. Only 19 out of 101 general practitioners were positive to introducing such a system.
PubMed ID
9182365 View in PubMed
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[Registration of activities performed by general practitioners]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68897
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Sep 30;121(23):2730-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-2001
Author
E A Brügger
O. Jøsendal
Author Affiliation
r-legek@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Sep 30;121(23):2730-1
Date
Sep-30-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergencies - epidemiology
English Abstract
Family Practice - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Night Care
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Problem Solving
Registries
Remote Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Task Performance and Analysis
Telephone
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We studied what kind of action general practitioners in a Norwegian rural community choose to take in order to solve problems raised by patients who contact the primary health service off-hours. Problems are solved either on the phone or by allowing the patient to consult the doctor in the surgery, by a home call, or by an emergency call with ambulance. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The community has a population of 4,556. All five GPs in the community registered all off-hour patient contacts over a period of six weeks (off-hours defined as the period from 3.30 PM to 8.00 AM on week-days, plus the weekend). RESULTS: 450 patients contacts were registered. 33% were solved on the phone, 48% through consultations in the surgery, 18% by home calls. Only two out of 450 contacts were emergencies. DISCUSSION: GPs performing off-hour services serve their patients with ordinary consultations. Less than 1% of patient contacts were actual emergencies.
PubMed ID
11699382 View in PubMed
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