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101 records – page 1 of 11.

Anticonvulsants and parental epilepsy in the development of birth defects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251352
Source
Lancet. 1976 Feb 7;1(7954):272-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-1976
Author
S. Shapiro
S C Hartz
V. Siskind
A A Mitchell
D. Slone
L. Rosenberg
R R Monson
O P Heinonen
Source
Lancet. 1976 Feb 7;1(7954):272-5
Date
Feb-7-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology - etiology
Epilepsy - complications - drug therapy
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence Tests
Male
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Phenobarbital - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Phenytoin - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - drug therapy
Retrospective Studies
United States
Abstract
The results of two studies, one in Finland and one in the U.S.A., raise the possibility that fetal damage previously attributed to phenytoin and other anticonvulsant drugs, principally phenobarbitone, may be due to epilepsy itself. In the U.S.A., drug-exposure information was collected before delivery in a cohort of 50 282 mother/child pairs. The total malformation rate in 305 children born to epileptic mothers was 10.5%, as against 6.4% in the remainder (p less than 0.01); corresponding rates for major malformations were 6.6% and 2.7%. When the fathers had epilepsy, the malformation-rates in their children were intermediate. The rates did not vary significantly according to maternal anticonvulsants therapy. Mental and motor scores as 8 months of age, and intelligence quotient scores at 4 years were lower in children of epileptic mothers, but not in children of epileptic fathers. The scores showed only random variation according to maternal anticonvulsant therapy. In Finland, 2784 children with craniofacial anomalies were compared with an equal number of normal children; 8 and 2 mothers, respectively, received anticonvulsants, while pregnant, for epilepsy. In that study, the separate effects of the disease and its treatmet could not be evaluated. Both studies did not find evidence of fetal damage when phenobarbitone was taken for indications other than epilepsy.
PubMed ID
55587 View in PubMed
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Association of alcohol consumption and Helicobacter pylori infection in young adulthood and early middle age among patients with gastric complaints. A case-control study on Finnish conscripts, officers and other military personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218551
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1994 Apr;10(2):205-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
M. Paunio
J. Höök-Nikanne
T U Kosunen
U. Vainio
M. Salaspuro
J. Mäkinen
O P Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1994 Apr;10(2):205-9
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcoholism - classification - complications - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal
Finland - epidemiology
Helicobacter Infections - complications - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Middle Aged
Military Personnel
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Stomach Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
There is growing evidence that Helicobacter pylori is responsible for a variety of gastric and duodenal changes which can eventually lead to stomach cancer. Little is known about risk factors for H. pylori infection. We re-analyzed the association of alcohol with H. pylori positivity in 451 conscripts, officers and other military personnel endoscoped due to gastric complaints in the Central Military Hospital of Finland in 1987 and 1988. Serology and culture were done in all patients. Alcohol consumption histories were obtained by use of a self-administered questionnaire. We observed a high odds ratio (OR) of H. pylori infection among young adults who were heavy alcohol consumers compared to non-drinkers (OR 5.32, 95% confidence interval: 1.09-25.95). There was evidence of a dose response when heavy and moderate drinkers were compared to non-drinkers (Mantel-Haenszel chi 2 for trend, p = 0.02) in young adulthood. A subgroup of young respondents who reported drinking all classes of alcohol (including hard liquor) showed an even stronger association and more significant dose-response. Multivariate techniques revealed a qualitative interaction of alcohol with H. pylori positivity in different age groups and among old people an inverse association of H. pylori and alcohol consumption was observed. These findings, if confirmed independently, might have implications for preventing a variety of gastric and duodenal lesions, since they allow identification of high risk groups.
PubMed ID
7813699 View in PubMed
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Atopy, smoking, and chronic bronchitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234384
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1987 Dec;41(4):300-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1987
Author
E O Terho
K. Husman
I. Vohlonen
O P Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Kuopio University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1987 Dec;41(4):300-5
Date
Dec-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bronchitis - epidemiology - etiology
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
The aim was to test the hypothesis that atopy increases the occurrence of chronic bronchitis. Relations between atopy, smoking, and chronic bronchitis were studied in farmers. The data were from two successive postal surveys and a skin prick tested subsample. The cross-sectional study consisted of 9017 farmers. Those 6899 farmers who did not have chronic bronchitis at the beginning and who continued farming were followed for three years. A sample of 150 farmers was skin-tested with 36 allergens. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis (rate per 1000), standardised for age and sex, was 41 in non-atopic non-smokers, 101 in atopic non-smokers, 106 in non-atopic smokers, and 257 in atopic smokers (effect of atopy: p less than 0.001; effect of smoking: p less than 0.001). The standardised incidence rates of chronic bronchitis (per 1000 farming years) were 14, 34, 36, and 50, respectively (atopy: p less than 0.001; smoking p less than 0.001). The relative risk of chronic bronchitis, calculated from the incidence data adjusting for the effects of age, sex, smoking or atopy by logistic regression analysis was 2.2 for atopy (95% confidence interval 1.8-2.7) and 2.3 for smoking (1.8-2.9). Only 20 farmers had chronic bronchitis in the skin-tested subjects; the results were consistent with the findings in the surveys but did not reach statistical significance for atopy. In conclusion, atopy and smoking have independent and additive effects on the occurrence of chronic bronchitis at least in dusty farming work.
Notes
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1976 Feb;84(2):134-91252041
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1979 Feb;119(2):193-203434592
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1980 Feb;121(2):329-387362139
Cites: Lancet. 1965 Feb 27;1(7383):445-814241880
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1982 Sep;70(3):199-2047108071
Cites: J Occup Med. 1983 Jan;25(1):43-76338175
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1965 Feb;10:338-4314232919
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1981 Mar-Apr;36(2):75-817212779
PubMed ID
3502671 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Feb;56(1):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
I. Rytömaa
V. Järvinen
R. Kanerva
O P Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, Institute of Dentistry, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Feb;56(1):36-40
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bulimia - complications
Case-Control Studies
Cold Temperature - diagnostic use
Dental caries - etiology - prevention & control
Dental Plaque Index
Dentin Sensitivity - etiology - prevention & control
Eating Disorders - complications
Educational Status
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Gastroesophageal Reflux - etiology
Gingival Hemorrhage - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Interviews as Topic
Periodontal Index
Risk factors
Saliva - secretion
Secretory Rate - physiology
Tooth Abrasion - etiology
Tooth Attrition - etiology
Tooth Erosion - etiology - prevention & control
Touch
Xerostomia - physiopathology
Abstract
Eating disorders are often associated with regurgitation of gastric contents into the mouth and dental erosion. In this study the dental status was evaluated in bulimic patients. Thirty-five bulimics, diagnosed in the Outpatient Departments of Psychiatry and Adolescent Psychiatry of the University Central Hospital in Helsinki, and 105 controls matched for age, sex, and educational level were examined clinically, and the factors associated with dental erosion and caries were evaluated in an interview. Severe dental erosion and dental caries were significantly commoner among bulimics than controls. Bulimics commonly had a low salivary flow rate, but other apparent risk factors of dental erosion did not differ from those of controls. A feeling of dry mouth was commoner among bulimics than controls, and bulimics had an increased tooth sensitivity to cold and touch. More should be done to protect teeth from dental erosion among bulimics, because loss of tooth tissue remains even if the eating disorder disappears.
PubMed ID
9537733 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular malformations and maternal exposure to video display terminals during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229495
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1990 Mar;6(1):61-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
J. Tikkanen
O P Heinonen
K. Kurppa
K. Rantala
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1990 Mar;6(1):61-6
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Systems
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Fetal Viability - radiation effects
Finland
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The possible effects of working with video display terminals (VDTs) during pregnancy on the occurrence of cardiovascular malformations in the offspring was studied in 500 cases and 1055 controls. The cases represented all registered cardiovascular malformations reported in Finland during 1982-84, excluding those with chromosomal anomaly or known genetic syndrome. The controls were randomly selected from all babies born during the same period. Both the case and control mothers were interviewed by midwives using a structured questionnaire approximately three months after delivery. In this interview the mother's occupation, job description and employer during the first trimester were noted, as were large number of other exposures to chemical and physical factors. An industrial hygienist examined all these records for information indicating exposure to VDTs, unaware of case/control status. Work with VDTs during the first trimester of pregnancy was ascertained for 30 case mothers (6.0%, 30/500) and 53 control mothers (5.0%, 53/1055). In logistic regression analysis maternal exposure to VDTs for at least 20h a week during the first trimester of pregnancy showed a point estimate of odds ratio of 1.4 with 95% confidence limits of 0.5 and 3.8, when adjusted for age and alcohol use. Maternal exposure to VDTs was not associated with indicators of fetal growth such as birthweight, placental weight or length of gestation.
PubMed ID
2344877 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular malformations and organic solvent exposure during pregnancy in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233656
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1988;14(1):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
J. Tikkanen
O P Heinonen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Unit of Statistics, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1988;14(1):1-8
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Environmental Exposure
Female
Finland
Heart Defects, Congenital - chemically induced - epidemiology
Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Solvents - adverse effects
Abstract
In order to investigate the possible association between cardiovascular malformations and maternal exposure to organic solvents during the first trimester of pregnancy, 569 cases and 1,052 controls were retrospectively studied. The cases represented all infants with diagnosed cardiovascular malformations born in Finland in 1982-1984, and the controls were randomly selected from all normal births in the country during the same period. All mothers were interviewed approximately 3 months after delivery by a midwife using a structured questionnaire. Exposures to organic solvents at work during the first trimester of pregnancy were slightly more prevalent among the mothers of affected infants (10.4%) than among those of controls (7.8%). Logistic regression analysis of exposure to organic solvents showed an adjusted relative odds ratio of 1.3 (95% confidence interval, 0.8-2.2). In the analysis of ventricular septal defect, exposure to organic solvents showed an adjusted relative odds ratio of 1.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.7).
PubMed ID
3407644 View in PubMed
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Caries frequency among 6-17-year-old participants of the Finnish public dental care during 1975-79.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242245
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1983 Feb;11(1):74-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1983
Author
H. Hausen
A. Milen
H. Tala
H. Nordling
I. Paunio
O P Heinonen
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1983 Feb;11(1):74-80
Date
Feb-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Finland
Humans
National Health Programs
Public Health Dentistry
Abstract
Temporal trends of caries frequency in 6-17-year-old children in Finland and its counties during 1975-79 are reported. Initially the attendance rate was 70%: during the 4-year follow-up it increased to 84%. The cross-sectional annual proportion of children needing curative treatment diminished from 80% to 67% at the age of 8 years; the changes among the 12- and 16-year-old children were 78-66% and 86-76%, respectively. The proportion of entirely caries-free children increased from 2.5% to 9.2% at the age of 8 years, only a slight increase was found in the older age groups. The mean DMFT value decreased continuously at all ages: in the 8-year-old children it decreased from 2.7% to 1.7%, in 12-year-olds from 6.7% to 5.2% and at the age of 16 from 13.4% to 11.6%. The caries scores decreased most in areas where the initial values were highest. In the county with high fluoride levels, where the initial caries scores were smallest, only slight improvement in the caries situation was found; this indicates no major change in recording of caries. Although a simultaneous improvement of the national attendance rate and the caries scores were observed, no consistent associations were found between the changes in the attendance rate and the changes in various caries indices when age and geographical area were considered in the analyses. It is concluded that the marked decrease in caries frequency is mainly due to preventive measures.
PubMed ID
6600670 View in PubMed
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Caries in 3-5 years-old, Finnish children participating in public dental car during 1975-79.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243981
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1981 Dec;9(6):270-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1981
Author
A. Milen
T. Hausen
H. Tala
I. Paunio
O P Heinonen
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1981 Dec;9(6):270-4
Date
Dec-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Care - trends
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Health Surveys
Finland
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Abstract
Nationwide and regional participation in the newly started dental care system, occurrence of caries and proportion of children registered to be in need of restorative treatment during 1974-1979 were studied in 3-5-year-old Finnish children. The data were collected from the annual reports of municipal dental health centers. The mean annual proportion of children participating in the care increased from 27% in 1974 to 71% in 1979. A clear improvement was noticed in each county, especially in areas where the earlier situation was poor. During the study period an average proportion of entirely cariesfree children increased from 24% at the beginning to 57% at the end of the study. The mean annual proportion of children recorded to be in need of restorative care decreased from 61% at the beginning to 32% at the end of the study period. The mean dmft value decreased from 3.7 in 1974 to 1.7 in 1979. A strong inverse relationship existed between the dental health at the beginning of the study period and the extent of changes in dental health during the 6-year-period. Thus regional differences having greatly diminished since the introduction of the public dental care system.
PubMed ID
6955126 View in PubMed
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Caries in permanent dentition and social class of children participating in public dental care in fluoridated and nonfluoridated areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243979
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1981 Dec;9(6):289-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1981
Author
H. Hausen
O P Heinonen
I. Paunio
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1981 Dec;9(6):289-91
Date
Dec-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Dental Care
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Fluoridation
Humans
Male
Social Class
Abstract
A random sample of 7-16-year-old children (n = 2778) who visited municipal dental clinics in fluoridated and non fluoridated areas were studied. Structured questionnaires were used to collect data on social class and fluoride exposure; caries diagnoses were made by local dentists in municipal dental clinics. Children from the highest social class had the lowest caries frequency in both fluoridated and nonfluoridated areas. Differences between middle and lower class children were small. Water fluoridation had a similar effect in all social classes.
PubMed ID
6955130 View in PubMed
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101 records – page 1 of 11.