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14 records – page 1 of 2.

25-Hydroxycholecaliferol and fractures of the proximal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252013
Source
Lancet. 1975 Aug 16;2(7929):300-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-16-1975
Author
B. Lund
O H Sorensen
A B Christensen
Source
Lancet. 1975 Aug 16;2(7929):300-2
Date
Aug-16-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Calcium - blood
Clinical Trials as Topic
Denmark
Femoral Fractures - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Great Britain
Humans
Hydroxycholecalciferols - blood - metabolism
Kidney - metabolism
Middle Aged
Osteomalacia - blood - complications - etiology
Phosphorus - blood
Seasons
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
Plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-H.C.C.) has been measured in 67 consective cases of fracture of the proximal femur. The values found in these patients were not different from values found in these patients were not different from those in control groups at the same time of the year. Plasma 25-H.C.C. was not correlated to plasma calcium or phosphorus, the Ca times P product, or the alkaline phosphatase. X-rays showed Looser zones in only 1 patient, in whom the lowest plasma 25-H.C.C. was found. Osteomalacia is not uncommon among elderly people in Denmark, but it is more likely to depend on a decline in the renal efficiency to convert 25-H.C.C. to 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol than a low dietary intake of vitamin D.
PubMed ID
50509 View in PubMed
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Bone mass and risk factors for bone loss in perimenopausal Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67600
Source
J Intern Med. 1997 Dec;242(6):505-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
C. Brot
L B Jensen
O H Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen Municipal Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Intern Med. 1997 Dec;242(6):505-11
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Weight
Bone Density
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - etiology - physiopathology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Weight Loss
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine risk factors for low bone mass at menopause and risk factors for subsequent bone loss in the following period. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study and a 2-year prospective follow-up. SETTING: The catchment area of Sundby Hospital in Copenhagen. SUBJECTS: Four hundred and thirty-three women aged 45-58 years, with amenorrhea for 3-24 months, of whom 87 were followed for a 2-year period. MEASUREMENTS: Registration of life-style and anthropometric variables, reproductive history, and family history of fractures. Total body bone mineral content (BMC) was measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. RESULTS: By means of multiple regression analysis height, body weight, and length of reproductive period were found to be positively related to whole body BMC (P
PubMed ID
9437412 View in PubMed
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The Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study (DOPS): project design and inclusion of 2000 normal perimenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202067
Source
Maturitas. 1999 Mar 15;31(3):207-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1999
Author
L. Mosekilde
A P Hermann
H. Beck-Nielsen
P. Charles
S P Nielsen
O H Sørensen
Author Affiliation
University Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Aarhus Amtssygehus, Denmark.
Source
Maturitas. 1999 Mar 15;31(3):207-19
Date
Mar-15-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Composition
Bone Density
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Spontaneous - epidemiology - prevention & control
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Premenopause
Research Design
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
In 1990 we initiated a 20 year, partly randomised study (Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study, DOPS) in order to (a) evaluate clinical, biochemical and osteodensitometric variables as predictors of low bone mass and future osteoporotic fractures, and (b) test the hypothesis, that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) initiated shortly after menopause reduces the risk of later osteoporotic fractures. This report describes study design and baseline characteristics of the DOPS-cohort.
The study design is pragmatic, attempting to mimic the normal clinical situation. Several HRT alternatives are available according to clinical need. It was considered futile, impractical and unethical to use placebo for 20 years. Instead the study focus on hard endpoints (fractures) confirmed by independent persons (peripheral fractures) or by methods which allow investigator blinding (spinal X-rays). Statistical evaluation will focus on intention to treat analyses evaluating the decision of HRT and it's feasibility. With a compliance of 60% we will have sufficient statistical power (88%) to detect a fracture reduction of 40% in the treatments group. Clinical risk factors, current daily intakes of macronutrients, vitamins and minerals, anthropometric variables, biochemical variables (including bone markers and 25-hydroxyvitamin D), regional bone mineral density (BMD) and total body composition were assessed in all participants at entry and at various follow up intervals.
2016 study participants were recruited by direct mailing to a random sample of 45-58 years old women. In the randomised arm 501 were allocated to HRT and 505 to no treatment. In the non-randomised arm 219 preferred HRT and 791 preferred no treatment. Post-randomisation analysis revealed a slight but significant difference in age (50.01 versus 50.44 years) but no difference in menopausal age, prevalence of hysterectomy, educational level, BMI, serum bone alkaline phosphatase, serum osteocalcin, urine hydroxyproline or serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. In the non-randomised arm women preferring HRT were closer to menopause, had a higher prevalence of hysterectomy, were better educated, were leaner, and had lower bone turnover than the women, who refused HRT.
It is possible to include a sufficient number of perimenopausal women in a randomised 20 year study on the antifracture effect of HRT.
PubMed ID
10340280 View in PubMed
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The destabilizing effect of body armour on military rifle bullets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210112
Source
Int J Legal Med. 1997;110(2):82-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
P J Knudsen
O H Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Pathology, Aarhus Kommunehospital, Denmark.
Source
Int J Legal Med. 1997;110(2):82-7
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Firearms
Humans
Protective Clothing
Wounds, Gunshot
Abstract
Soft body armour is designed to give protection against fragments and some low velocity bullets but is not designed to stop high velocity rifle bullets. Reports have claimed that soft body armour might disturb the stability of bullets that penetrate it, and that this might increase the size of the lesions. The reason for such an effect might be early yaw of the bullet, so we studied the behaviour of bullets which had passed through soft body armour. A 7.62 x 39 mm AK-47 rifle was fired from a permanent stand using full metal jacketed lead core bullets at a range of 30 m. Soft body armour composed for 14 and 28 layers of aramid fibres (Kevlar) was placed at 90 degrees and 60 degrees to the line of fire. Yaw was measured by the shadowgraph technique and a TERMA Doppler radar. A total of ten shots without body armour, and ten shots with each of the two types of body armour at the two angles were used. The results of the shadowgraph and Doppler radar measurements showed a proportional correlation between the two methods of determining the bullet yaw. The semiquantitative approach of the Doppler radar measurement was in agreement with the more concise measurement using the photographic technique. Velocity loss and loss of spin rate from penetrating 14 or 28 ply Kevlar was negligible. We observed induced instability after penetration of 14 and particularly 28 ply Kevlar, dependence of yaw with respect to the number of layers of Kevlar as well as to the angle of the body armour with respect to the line of fire.
PubMed ID
9168325 View in PubMed
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Hormone replacement therapy dissociates fat mass and bone mass, and tends to reduce weight gain in early postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled 5-year clinical trial of the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186795
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2003 Feb;18(2):333-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
L B Jensen
P. Vestergaard
A P Hermann
J. Gram
P. Eiken
B. Abrahamsen
C. Brot
N. Kolthoff
O H Sørensen
H. Beck-Nielsen
S Pors Nielsen
P. Charles
L. Mosekilde
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Amager Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2003 Feb;18(2):333-42
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Body Composition - drug effects
Body mass index
Body Weight - drug effects
Bone Density - drug effects
Bone and Bones - drug effects - pathology - physiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Estrogens - metabolism
Female
Hip - pathology
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Linear Models
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Menopause
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis
Postmenopause
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to study the influence of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on weight changes, body composition, and bone mass in early postmenopausal women in a partly randomized comprehensive cohort study design. A total of 2016 women ages 45-58 years from 3 months to 2 years past last menstrual bleeding were included. One thousand were randomly assigned to HRT or no HRT in an open trial, whereas the others were allocated according to their preferences. All were followed for 5 years for body weight, bone mass, and body composition measurements. Body weight increased less over the 5 years in women randomized to HRT (1.94 +/- 4.86 kg) than in women randomized to no HRT (2.57 +/- 4.63, p = 0.046). A similar pattern was seen in the group receiving HRT or not by their own choice. The smaller weight gain in women on HRT was almost entirely caused by a lesser gain in fat. The main determinant of the weight gain was a decline in physical fitness. Women opting for HRT had a significantly lower body weight at inclusion than the other participants, but the results in the self-selected part of the study followed the pattern found in the randomized part. The change in fat mass was the strongest predictor of bone changes in untreated women, whereas the change in lean body mass was the strongest predictor when HRT was given. Body weight increases after the menopause. The gain in weight is related to a decrease in working capacity. HRT is associated with a smaller increase in fat mass after menopause. Fat gain protects against bone loss in untreated women but not in HRT-treated women. The data suggest that women's attitudes to HRT are more positive if they have low body weight, but there is no evidence that the conclusions in this study are skewed by selection bias.
PubMed ID
12568411 View in PubMed
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The influence of smoking on vitamin D status and calcium metabolism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10559
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1999 Dec;53(12):920-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
C. Brot
N R Jorgensen
O H Sorensen
Author Affiliation
Osteoporosis Research Center, Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen Municipal Hospital, Denmark. cxb@fdir.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1999 Dec;53(12):920-6
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acids - urine
Bone Density
Bone and Bones - metabolism
Calcium - blood - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Osteocalcin - blood
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Phosphates - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - adverse effects
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood - metabolism
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of smoking on serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), serum vitamin D metabolites, serum ionized calcium, serum phosphate, and biochemical markers of bone turnover in a cohort of 510 healthy Danish perimenopausal women. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SETTING: Copenhagen, Denmark. SUBJECTS: Five-hundred-and-ten healthy women aged 45-58 y, included 3-24 months after last menstrual bleeding. None were using hormone replacement therapy. METHODS: The women were grouped according to their current smoking status. The two groups were compared with regard to serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-(OH)2D), intact PTH, ionized calcium and phosphate, osteocalcin, as well as urine pyridinolines. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured with DEXA-scans. Multiple regression analyses were performed to detect the effect of potentially confounding lifestyle factors, such as calcium and vitamin D intakes, alcohol and coffee consumption, sunbathing, and physical exercise. RESULTS: Fifty percent were current smokers. Smokers had significantly reduced levels of serum 25OHD (P=0.02), 1,25(OH)2D (P=0.001), and PTH (P
PubMed ID
10602348 View in PubMed
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Measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in serum and its relation to sunshine, age and vitamin D intake in the Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247526
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1979 Feb;39(1):23-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1979
Author
B. Lund
O H Sørensen
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1979 Feb;39(1):23-30
Date
Feb-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Animals
Binding, Competitive
Biological Assay
Chromatography
Denmark
Female
Humans
Hydroxycholecalciferols - blood
Kidney - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Radioligand Assay
Rats
Seasons
Sunlight
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
A competitive protein-binding assay for 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) based upon a specific binding protein in the cytosol from rachitic rat kidneys is described. A diethyl ether extraction followed by separation by freezing was used. The extracts were chromatographed on short silicic acid columns, which separated 25-hydroxycholecalciferol from cholecalciferol, 24,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, and 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol. A small aliquot of the 25-OHD fraction was used in the assay and free and bound vitamin were separated by dextran coated charcoal. The lower detection limit was 0.8 ng/ml (2.0 nmol/l). The levels of 25-OHD were measured in 596 healthy subjects and a seasonal variation was demonstrated. This variation, however, was only found in those without regular vitamin D intake, whereas the level of 25-OHD remained constant throughout the year in subjects with regular vitamin D supplement. The levels of 25-OHD were lower in the elderly subjects compared to younger ones, but seasonal variation was observed in both groups. In the summer months there was a significant correlation between age and the 25-OHD level. The mean levels of 25-OHD in Denmark are within the range of means found in the United States and Sweden but are higher than those reported from England, Belgium and France. This indicates a relatively high vitamin D intake in the Danish population and a low risk of nutritional vitamin D deficiency.
PubMed ID
523951 View in PubMed
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Relationships between bone mineral density, serum vitamin D metabolites and calcium:phosphorus intake in healthy perimenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201848
Source
J Intern Med. 1999 May;245(5):509-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
C. Brot
N. Jørgensen
O R Madsen
L B Jensen
O H Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Osteoporosis Research Centre, Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen Municipal Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Intern Med. 1999 May;245(5):509-16
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Bone Density
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet Records
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Phosphorus, Dietary - administration & dosage - blood
Premenopause
Reference Values
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
To determine the relationships between serum vitamin D metabolites, bone mass, and dietary calcium and phosphorus in a cohort of 510 healthy Danish perimenopausal women.
A population-based cross-sectional study.
A total of 510 healthy women aged 45-58 years, with amenorrhoea for 3-24 months. None of the women was using hormone replacement therapy.
Measurements of total bone mineral content and regional bone mineral density were performed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Analyses of serum levels of 25-OHD and 1,25-(OH)2D, intact PTH, ionized calcium and phosphate, as well as biochemical markers of bone turnover in blood and urine. Assessment of calcium and phosphorus intake using dietary records.
A consistent inverse relationship between serum 1,25-(OH)2D and bone mineral content/ density was found in whole-body mineral content (P = 0.001), spine (P = 0.005) and femoral neck (P
PubMed ID
10363752 View in PubMed
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Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and vitamin D intake in healthy young adults in Britain and Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245888
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1980 Apr;40(2):145-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1980
Author
E. Lester
R K Skinner
A Y Foo
B. Lund
O H Sørensen
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1980 Apr;40(2):145-50
Date
Apr-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Denmark
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Hydroxycholecalciferols - blood
Male
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - metabolism
Abstract
The serum 25-hyroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentrations of healthy young hospital laboratory workers in Britain and Denmark were compared in relation to assay variation and vitamin D intake. Serum samples from subjects in London and Copenhagen were assayed in both countries. The Danish assay gave higher values than the British assay with a correlation r = 0.88 and a linear regression of British values on Danish values of y = 0.60x + 3.35. Factors which might account for this difference were differences in the extraction procedure and in the range of values covered by the standards used in the two countries. However, the mean serum 25-OHD concentrations of the Danish group were significantly higher than those of the British group when all the samples were assayed in both countries. The mean total daily vitamin D uptake of the Danish group was significantly higher than that of the British group but this difference was almost entirely due to the regular intake of vitamin D tablets by sixteen of the twenty-five Danish subjects. Only one British subject took supplements. The vitamin D content of the food eaten was similar in the two groups. No correlation was found between dietary, as opposed to supplementary, vitamin D intake and serum 25-OHD levels presumably because the exposure of these subjects to ultra-violet light was adequate to compensate for minor differences in intake.
PubMed ID
7256182 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.