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27 records – page 1 of 3.

[Ampicillin resistant Haemophilus influenzae. 3 documented cases in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41990
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1977 Apr 11;139(15):887-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-11-1977

[An outbreak of Streptococcus pyogenes infections in institutions for the mentally retarded in Greater Copenhagen 1995].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212367
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Mar 18;158(12):1679-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-18-1996
Author
B. Kristensen
B. Egelund
M. Meyer
J. Henrichsen
O B Jepsen
C J Sievers
C. Lundstedt
Author Affiliation
Den centrale afdeling for sygehushygiejne, Statens Seruminstitut, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Mar 18;158(12):1679-82
Date
Mar-18-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Institutionalization
Intellectual Disability - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Pharyngitis - complications - microbiology
Prospective Studies
Scarlet Fever - epidemiology - microbiology
Streptococcal Infections - epidemiology
Streptococcus pyogenes - isolation & purification
Abstract
The largest reported outbreak of infections due to Streptococcus pyogenes, M-type 18, in recent years is described. Ninety persons at institutions for mentally retarded (73% residents) had infections due to the epidemic strain. Pharyngitis and scarlatina were the most common infections. Six patients died, five having a streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. During the outbreak an intensive surveillance was carried out together with improved infection control measures and prompt culturing of residents and employees before antimicrobial treatment. The primary outbreak was confined but a secondary outbreak could not be prevented. This was probably due to difficulties in implementing proper isolation precautions in this setting.
PubMed ID
8644412 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic therapy of meningitis caused by ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae in Denmark and Greenland 1981 to 1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38402
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1988 Oct;7(5):646-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1988
Author
T. Cordtz
O B Jepsen
M. Arpi
P. Hønberg
Author Affiliation
National Center for Hospital Hygiene, Copenhagen S, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1988 Oct;7(5):646-50
Date
Oct-1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ampicillin - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Denmark
Greenland
Haemophilus influenzae - drug effects
Humans
Infant
Meningitis, Haemophilus - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Penicillin resistance
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
A survey was performed in Denmark and Greenland in order to determine whether the current recommendation of ampicillin (400 mg/kg/day) for initial treatment of purulent meningitis is appropriate. Data obtained 1981-1987 in an ongoing nationwide programme for surveillance of ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus species was analysed, and patient records of 21 cases of meningitis caused by ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae strains (17 in Denmark, 4 in Greenland) reported in the period 1981-1987 were reviewed. In Denmark the overall rate of ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae was estimated to be approximately 2% for the study period, and the average rate of resistant isolates from spinal fluid was 5.2% (range 0-12.3%). The incidence of meningitis caused by ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae strains remained low in the Danish population (around 0.05/100,000/year) except for a peak in 1985. The overall mortality rate of Haemophilus influenzae meningitis for the study period was 2.4%, which was the same as before 1980. In Greenland the actual number of cases of meningitis caused by ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae was small, but the incidence was at least 40 to 80 times higher than in Denmark with a high mortality rate (50%). These observations prompted revision of the antibiotic regimen in Greenland, whereas the regimen was considered appropriate in Denmark.
PubMed ID
3143574 View in PubMed
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Bacteremia in a general hospital. A prospective study of 102 consecutive cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252763
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1975;7(3):179-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Author
O B Jepsen
B. Korner
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1975;7(3):179-84
Date
1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross Infection - epidemiology
Denmark
Enterobacteriaceae - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Sepsis - microbiology
Staphylococcus - isolation & purification
Streptococcus - isolation & purification
Abstract
A prospective clinical-bacteriological study of 102 consecutive cases of confirmed bacteremia at a Copenhagen City general hospital was carried out during 5 months of 1973 with special concern given to focus of infection and acquisition of microorganisms. Valid positive cultures were obtained from 7.2 patients per 1000 admissions. 50 of the 102 bacteremias were by all probability acquired in the hospital, mainly due to transurethral manipulations or intravenous lines. Pneumonia and hepatobiliary infections accounted for most of the non-hospital acquired bacteremias. 26/102 patients died in relation to the bacteremia. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus caused more than half of the infections. Bacteremia caused by proteus, klebsiella, enterobacter species of staphylococci was in most cases nosocomial and carried the highest mortality, i.e. 40%, verus 15% when other organisms were responsible. It is concluded that nosocomial bacteremia is a frequent and life-endangering complication which is often preceded by certain diagnostic or therapeutic procedures, not invariably linked to severe underlying diseases. Consequently, attempts to reduce bacteremic episodes should include surveillance of ecological factors and certain hospital procedures.
PubMed ID
1101372 View in PubMed
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The DANOP-DATA system: a low-cost personal computer based program for monitoring of wound infections in surgical ward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231043
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1989 Apr;13(3):273-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1989
Author
P. Kjaeldgaard
T. Cordtz
D. Sejberg
E. Kjaersgaard
M P Sillemann
J. La Cour Andersen
O B Jepsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Bacteriology, Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1989 Apr;13(3):273-9
Date
Apr-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Hospital Departments
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Microcomputers
Population Surveillance
Surgery Department, Hospital
Surgical Wound Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
A low-cost personal computer program to monitor surgical wound infections was developed in parallel to the Danish national guidelines for recording postoperative wound infections. Internationally accepted definitions were used. The program offers three fixed-data entry screens and produces user-specified variations of four standard tables, comprising most of the epidemiological data needed for surveillance and infection control. The program was tested in Danish hospitals and was found to serve well as a simple local tool for the operating staff, offering fast information on infection rates. Results from two hospitals consisting of 3904 operations are presented. Infections occurring after discharge were included. Overall infection rates for clean wounds were 2.3%, clean-contaminated wounds 4.7%, contaminated wounds 4.3% and dirty operations 8.3%. None of the hospitals had used infection surveillance systems before.
PubMed ID
2567757 View in PubMed
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Failure to detect a general reduction of surgical wound infections in Danish hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213895
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1995 Nov;42(5):485-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
K B Poulsen
O B Jepsen
Author Affiliation
Statens Seruminstitut, København S.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1995 Nov;42(5):485-8
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross Infection - diagnosis - epidemiology
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Surgical Wound Infection - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to see if introduction of continuous monitoring of the incidence of surgical wound infections would result in a reduction in the cumulated infection rates. Data from a Danish sentinel system, including more than 65,000 operations, are shown to be sufficiently representative to be used as the basis of a national surveillance system for surgical wound infections. The overall infection rates increased with age and with contamination of the wound. Antibiotic prophylaxis was used in 36% of the operations, with a higher fraction among elderly patients, and in contaminated or major operations. The length of stay was significantly and equally extended for patients with superficial or deep infections, compared to patients without wound infections. The results from 13 departments could be followed at least two years from the beginning of the registration. No general preventive effects of the continuous monitoring were found in these surgical units.
PubMed ID
8747804 View in PubMed
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High antibiotic consumption in Danish intensive care units?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200002
Source
APMIS. 1999 Nov;107(11):989-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
I S Petersen
L. Hesselbjerg
L. Jørgensen
J. Renstrup
S. Barnung
J. Schierbeck
O B Jepsen
Author Affiliation
National Centre of Hygiene, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
APMIS. 1999 Nov;107(11):989-96
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Denmark
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Decreased antibiotic susceptibility among microorganisms isolated from intensive care unit (ICU) patients is found to be associated with high total antibiotic consumption or inappropriate use of antibiotics in the ICUs. The aims of this study were: 1) to characterize the antibiotic consumption in Danish ICUs, and in four ICUs with expectedly large differences in levels of antibiotic consumption, 2) to estimate the association between antibiotic susceptibility among isolated microorganisms and antibiotic consumption. This was done by: 1) a retrospective questionnaire study of the annual supply of antibiotics in 1995 to 30 ICUs in Denmark, and 2) a 2-month prospective study of patients and microbiological samples in four Danish ICUs in 1996. We found that the supply of antibiotics to Danish ICUs was substantial, with a median value of 124 DDD/100 patient days. No association was found between high consumption of antibiotics and decreased antibiotic susceptibility in the four ICUs.
PubMed ID
10598870 View in PubMed
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Increased number of sporadic nosocomial group A streptococcal bacteraemias during a community epidemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14470
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1991 Oct;19(2):129-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1991
Author
S. Strøbaek
O B Jepsen
J. Zimakoff
T. Rønne
Author Affiliation
Statens Seruminstitut, National Centre for Hospital Hygiene, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1991 Oct;19(2):129-36
Date
Oct-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ampicillin - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - epidemiology - microbiology
Comparative Study
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Penicillins - therapeutic use
Retrospective Studies
Streptococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Streptococcus pyogenes - isolation & purification
Abstract
An increased morbidity rate due to Lancefield group A streptococci (GAS) in the Scandinavian countries, beginning late in 1987, led to the present retrospective survey of bacteraemias with GAS in Denmark. Among 242 reported cases from January 1987-December 1989, 94 were found to have been nosocomially acquired, and their occurrence mirrored the pattern of the epidemic with T-type 1 and the seasonal variation of other serotypes in the community. The 27 nosocomial cases from 1988 were studied further. Eighty percent were associated with postoperative wound infection, erysipelas, puerperal or neonatal infection. Of the 52 community-acquired cases in 1988, 80% comprised erysipelas, respiratory tract infection, meningitis, gastrointestinal disease or arthritis. The bacteraemic patients were promptly treated with antibiotics, but the use of penicillin was in some cases delayed because the clinical signs of streptococcal infection were misinterpreted by the attending clinician. Ideally, the nosocomial infections should have been prevented by hygienic measures in the hospitals. When an epidemic situation of this type exists in the community, handwashing routines become vitally important. A warning for epidemics should be extended to the hospital.
PubMed ID
1684605 View in PubMed
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Infection control in Danish healthcare: organization and practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195114
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2001 Apr;47(4):262-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
O B Jepsen
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Hospital Hygiene, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. ob@ssi.dk
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2001 Apr;47(4):262-5
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Denmark
Humans
Infection Control - organization & administration - standards
PubMed ID
11289768 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.