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Aging in rural Canada: a retrospective and review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132883
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Sep;30(3):323-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Norah Keating
Jennifer Swindle
Stephanie Fletcher
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta. Norah.keating@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Sep;30(3):323-38
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Canada
Family
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Independent living
Leisure Activities
Research
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Social Participation
Social Support
Work
Abstract
Research on rural aging has developed considerably since publication of the book Aging in Rural Canada (Butterworths, 1991). The purpose of this article is twofold: to provide a retrospective on issues in rural aging from this book, and to review Canadian literature on rural aging since its publication. The review highlights new directions in conceptual definitions of rural, and in issues of social engagement, independence, family and social networks, and rural services and health. Two main research lenses are evident. The marginalization lens focuses on rural seniors with health problems, but has not included those marginalized by poverty or gender. The aging-well lens focuses on contributions and engagement, but has omitted research on social relationships and quality of family interaction. The report includes a call for interrogation about interaction between people and place, and for understanding issues of rural diversity and processes of rural aging.
PubMed ID
21767464 View in PubMed
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Cheaper for whom? Costs experienced by formal caregivers in adult family living programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174668
Source
J Aging Soc Policy. 2005;17(2):67-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Donna Dosman
Norah Keating
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology, 3-02 Human Ecology Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2N1. ddosman@ualberta.ca
Source
J Aging Soc Policy. 2005;17(2):67-83
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Assisted Living Facilities - economics - organization & administration
Canada
Caregivers - economics - psychology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Frail Elderly
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Public Policy
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - economics
Abstract
A current emphasis in Canadian public policy is on community care for frail seniors. Such care is viewed as attractive in part because public costs are lower than for traditional nursing home care. Adult Family Living (AFL) is seen as an exemplar of this community focus. Data from a multi-model evaluation of residential continuing care in western Canada are used to show that while AFL programs have lower public costs than nursing homes, AFL caregivers incur high levels of economic and non-economic costs. We address the question of the sustainability of this approach to community-based residential care in light of the apparent transfer of public costs to AFL caregivers.
PubMed ID
15911518 View in PubMed
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Client-centred, community-based care for frail seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184792
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2003 May;11(3):253-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Sherry Anne Chapman
Norah Keating
Jacquie Eales
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2003 May;11(3):253-61
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Frail Elderly
Health Services Research
Humans
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Abstract
Compared with nursing home care, community care, which is often viewed in Canada as care at home, is assumed to be best for older adults with chronic disease or disabilities since it is seen as client-focused and less costly. As the number of frail seniors living in the community increases, governments in Canada seek to provide alternate models of nursing home care. As part of a larger initiative meant to increase the scope of community programmes, a demonstration project was conducted in western Canada to evaluate the implementation of client-centred, community-based residential care with individuals requiring nursing-home-level care. The present authors explore two main implementation challenges: whether care that is responsive to individual preferences can be provided to people who cannot assume active decision-making roles; and whether care can be centred in the community if people are living in residential care settings rather than in their own homes. Focus groups were conducted with two key stakeholder groups with varying informal (family members) and formal (programme staff) relationships with residents living in three new programmes. From content analysis, the programmes appeared successful in conveying the importance of recognising residents as individuals and of keeping them connected to the community, but fell short of implementation expectations. Three themes illustrate the challenges: (1) engaging with others in a care partnership; (2) responding to residents' preferences and care needs with limited resources; and (3) maintaining residents' connections with the community. To improve the feasibility of these programmes, some changes could be pursued within existing financial resources. However moderating the funding to bring it somewhat closer to nursing home levels could support the sustainability of community-situated programmes for frail seniors.
PubMed ID
12823430 View in PubMed
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Evaluating consumer satisfaction in residential continuing care settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186865
Source
J Aging Soc Policy. 2002;14(2):85-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Lori Moran
Elizabeth White
Jacquie Eales
Janet Fast
Norah Keating
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2E7. lmoran@ualberta.ca
Source
J Aging Soc Policy. 2002;14(2):85-109
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta
Consumer Satisfaction
Female
Humans
Long-Term Care - psychology
Male
Questionnaires
Residential Facilities
Abstract
The outcome of the project reported on here is a client-centered consumer satisfaction questionnaire designed to evaluate new models of residential continuing care in Alberta, Canada. Satisfaction is defined as a multi-dimensional construct that is grounded in the consumer's experience. Consultation with the clients of the services during development of the instrument ensured that characteristics important to the clients were assessed. The result is an instrument with which to measure satisfaction that is fully client-centered and that, with appropriate modifications, can be used to monitor any client-centered program for cognitively-able continuing care clients.
PubMed ID
12557995 View in PubMed
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Predictors of older adults' capacity for medication management in a self-medication program: a retrospective chart review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185029
Source
J Aging Health. 2003 May;15(2):332-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Sheri L Maddigan
Karen B Farris
Norah Keating
Cheryl A Wiens
Jeffrey A Johnson
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta
Source
J Aging Health. 2003 May;15(2):332-52
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Alberta
Cognition
Health Services for the Aged
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Medication Errors - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient compliance
Patient Education as Topic
Risk factors
Self Administration
Abstract
The aim of this project was to identify variables that predicted older adults' ability to manage medications.
The study used a retrospective cohort design and was set in a self-medication program within a rehabilitation hospital. A random sample of charts from 301 participants in the self-medication program was reviewed.
Logistic regression models accounted for 26.7% and 55.8% of the variance in the probability of making one or more self-medication errors during the initial and final weeks of the program, respectively. The importance of cognition in predicting medication management capacity was seen in bivariate and multivariate analyses and through a number of interactions with other predictors. Statistically significant predictors in one or both analyses included medication regimen complexity, Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) score, duration of institutionalization, depression, and interactions between (a) medication regimen complexity and MMSE score and (b) ability to cook and MMSE score.
The direct effects of cognition and medication regimen complexity were important predictors of medication management capacity.
PubMed ID
12795276 View in PubMed
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Unequal social engagement for older adults: constraints on choice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126607
Source
Can J Aging. 2012 Mar;31(1):25-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Julia Rozanova
Norah Keating
Jacquie Eales
Author Affiliation
Brown University.
Source
Can J Aging. 2012 Mar;31(1):25-36
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Choice Behavior
Female
Health status
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Personal Satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Rural Population
Sex Factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Although some studies have confirmed positive associations between social engagement and well-being in later life, this study aimed to understand why some seniors cannot be engaged. The authors analyzed the lived experiences of 89 seniors in three rural communities in Canada, from semi-structured interviews and using the constant comparison method. Five factors make choices for social engagement in later life unequal among older adults who differ by gender, class, age, and health status. Profound engagement in care work, compulsory altruism, personal resources, objectively perceived and subjectively available engagement opportunities, and ageist barriers around paid work constrain choices for seniors who lack privilege in the context of a market economy, particularly for low-income older women. To avoid stigmatizing vulnerable older persons, societal barriers to meaningful activities must be addressed - for example, through provision of income security or by reversing inter- and intragenerational ageism in access to the labor market.
PubMed ID
22373781 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.