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Acupuncture reduces crying in infants with infantile colic: a randomised, controlled, blind clinical study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139981
Source
Acupunct Med. 2010 Dec;28(4):174-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Kajsa Landgren
Nina Kvorning
Inger Hallström
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Kajsa.Landgren@med.lu.se
Source
Acupunct Med. 2010 Dec;28(4):174-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Points
Acupuncture Therapy - methods
Colic - therapy
Crying
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior - physiology
Infant Care - methods
Infant, Newborn
Male
Single-Blind Method
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To investigate whether acupuncture reduces the duration and intensity of crying in infants with colic. Patients and methods 90 otherwise healthy infants, 2-8 weeks old, with infantile colic were randomised in this controlled blind study. 81 completed a structured programme consisting of six visits during 3 weeks to an acupuncture clinic in Sweden. Parents blinded to the allocation of their children met a blinded nurse. The infant was subsequently given to another nurse in a separate room, who handled all infants similarly except that infants allocated to receive acupuncture were given minimal, standardised acupuncture for 2 s in LI4.
There was a difference (p=0.034) favouring the acupuncture group in the time which passed from inclusion until the infant no longer met the criteria for colic. The duration of fussing was lower in the acupuncture group the first (74 vs 129 min; p=0.029) and second week (71 vs 102 min; p=0.047) as well as the duration of colicky crying in the second intervention week (9 vs 13 min; p=0.046) was lower in the acupuncture group. The total duration of fussing, crying and colicky crying (TC) was lower in the acupuncture group during the first (193 vs 225 min; p=0.025) and the second intervention week (164 vs 188 min; p=0.016). The relative difference from baseline throughout the intervention weeks showed differences between groups for fussing in the first week (22 vs 6 min; p=0.028), for colicky crying in the second week (92 vs 73 min; p=0.041) and for TC in the second week (44 vs 29 min; p=0.024), demonstrating favour towards the acupuncture group.
Minimal acupuncture shortened the duration and reduced the intensity of crying in infants with colic. Further research using different acupuncture points, needle techniques and intervals between treatments is required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20959312 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture relieves pelvic and low-back pain in late pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58300
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Mar;83(3):246-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Nina Kvorning
Catharina Holmberg
Lars Grennert
Anders Aberg
Jonas Akeson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Hospital of Helsingborg, Sweden. nina.kvorning-ternov@helsingborgslasarett.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Mar;83(3):246-50
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - methods
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - therapy
Pain Measurement
Pelvic Pain - diagnosis - therapy
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - therapy
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Probability
Reference Values
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effect and possible adverse effects of acupuncture for pelvic and low-back pain during the last trimester of pregnancy. METHODS: Following individual informed consent, 72 pregnant women reporting pelvic or low-back pain were randomized during pregnancy weeks 24-37 to an acupuncture group (n = 37) or to a control group (n = 35) at three maternity wards in southern Sweden. Traditional acupuncture points and local tender points (TP) were chosen according to individual pain patterns and stimulated once or twice a week until delivery or complete recovery in acupuncture patients. Control patients were given no sham stimulation. Throughout the study period each patient made weekly visual analog scale (VAS) evaluations of maximal and minimal pain intensity as well as three-point assessments of pain intensity during various activities. RESULTS: During the study period, VAS scorings of pain intensity decreased over time in 60% of patients in the acupuncture group and in 14% of those in the control group (p
PubMed ID
14995919 View in PubMed
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Associations between demographics and health-related quality of life for chronic non-malignant pain patients treated at a multidisciplinary pain centre: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278145
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2016 Feb;28(1):86-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Hanne Irene Jensen
Karin Plesner
Nina Kvorning
Bo Lunddal Krogh
Alan Kimper-Karl
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2016 Feb;28(1):86-91
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - epidemiology
Chronic Pain - epidemiology - therapy
Demography
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Clinics
Pain Measurement
Quality of Life
Abstract
To describe the associations between demographics and health-related quality of life for chronic non-malignant pain patients.
A cohort study.
A multidisciplinary Danish pain centre.
All patients treated at the centre between 2007 and 2013.
Levels of pain, anxiety and depression, and physical and mental status. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) were used.
A total of 1176 patients were included. The majority were women (64%), the mean age was 46.7 ± 14.4 (range 18-89), and 21% were able to work full or part time. On a Numeric Rating Scale from 0 to 10, median pain-intensity was 8 (interquartile range 7-8) and pain-discomfort 8 (interquartile range 7-9) at time of referral. More than half of the patients had symptoms of anxiety and depression. Most of the individual SF-36 domains had median scores between 0 and 40 (Scale from 0 to 100). Patients younger than 50 years of age as well as patients on sick leave/disability pension had significantly lower SF-36 scores. Level of pain, anxiety and depression decreased and SF-36-scores increased significantly after a course of treatment which in most cases consisted of both medical, physiotherapeutic and psychological treatment as well as health-oriented education. The chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-test, the Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon Signed-rank test were used for analyses.
In order to improve treatment at a multidisciplinary pain centre, it may be of value to target treatments to different patient subgroups based on, amongst other things, age and employment status.
PubMed ID
26678805 View in PubMed
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