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Antibiotic resistance patterns of bacteria causing urinary tract infections in the elderly living in nursing homes versus the elderly living at home: an observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269775
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2015;15:98
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Mark Fagan
Morten Lindbæk
Nils Grude
Harald Reiso
Maria Romøren
Dagfinn Skaare
Dag Berild
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2015;15:98
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Infective Agents, Urinary - classification - pharmacology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Escherichia coli - drug effects
Escherichia coli Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Proteus Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Proteus mirabilis - drug effects
Sex Factors
Urinalysis - methods
Urinary Tract Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Antibiotic resistance is a problem in nursing homes. Presumed urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common infection. This study examines urine culture results from elderly patients to see if specific guidelines based on gender or whether the patient resides in a nursing home (NH) are warranted.
This is a cross sectional observation study comparing urine cultures from NH patients with urine cultures from patients in the same age group living in the community.
There were 232 positive urine cultures in the NH group and 3554 in the community group. Escherichia coli was isolated in 145 urines in the NH group (64%) and 2275 (64%) in the community group. There were no clinically significant differences in resistance. Combined, there were 3016 positive urine cultures from females and 770 from males. Escherichia coli was significantly more common in females 2120 (70%) than in males 303 (39%) (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
26238248 View in PubMed
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Blood donor Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato seroprevalence and history of tick bites at a northern limit of the vector distribution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283403
Source
APMIS. 2017 Jun 14;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-14-2017
Author
Dag Hvidsten
Liisa Mortensen
Bjørn Straume
Mirjana Grujic Arsenovic
Anne-Berit Pedersen
Gro Lyngås
Jeremy S Gray
Nils Grude
Source
APMIS. 2017 Jun 14;
Date
Jun-14-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In order to study the antibody seroprevalence of the causal agent of Lyme borreliosis, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), and the history of tick bites at a geographical distribution limit of Ixodes ricinus, we compared healthy blood donors in geographically extreme regions: the borreliosis-endemic Vestfold County (59?N) and the region of northern Norway. Blood samples were screened using IgG/VlsE ELISA, and positive/borderline samples were confirmed using C6 ELISA and immunoblot assays. Also, donors completed a questionnaire consisting of several items including the places they have lived, and whether they owned any pets. The seroprevalence was 0.48% (5/1048) in northern Norway and 9.25% (48/519) in Vestfold County. Seven donors (of 1048) had experienced a single tick bite in the southern part of Nordland County (65?N) in northern Norway. This first study on B. burgdorferi s.l. antibody seroprevalence and tick bites on humans and pets in northern Norway showed that the seroprevalence of B. burgdorferi s.l. infection and the risk of tick bite in northern Norway are insignificant; the fact that only five positive IgG samples were detected underscores the very low background seroprevalence. These results suggest that so far I. ricinus has not expanded north of the previously established geographical distribution limit.
PubMed ID
28612350 View in PubMed
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[Calicivirus and acute gastroenteritis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187042
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Nov 10;122(27):2602-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2002
Author
Kirsti Vainio
Nils Grude
Author Affiliation
Smitteverndivisjonen Nasjonalt folkehelseinstitutt Postboks 4404 Nydalen 0403 Oslo. kirsti.vainio@fhi.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Nov 10;122(27):2602-4
Date
Nov-10-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Caliciviridae Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Disease Outbreaks
Feces - virology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Humans
Infection Control
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Seasons
Abstract
Outbreaks of calicivirus gastroenteritis are common during the winter season, especially among elderly residents in institutions. The outbreaks are often difficult to control in institutions and may occasionally result in closure of wards. Reliable diagnostic methods are therefore important. We have studied the prevalence of calicivirus in samples sent to our laboratory for calicivirus detection during the winter season 2001 to 2002.
The presence of calicivirus was studied by nested RT-PCR. A total of 117 faecal samples obtained from patients with suspected calicivirus gastroenteritis were examined.
Sixteen outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis were observed during the study period. While calicivirus was confirmed in nine of the outbreaks, the virus was detected in only 25 of the 117 faecal samples analyzed (21%). An increased detection rate was observed when faecal samples were collected during the first two days after onset of symptoms.
Appropriate surveillance systems are required in order to control calicivirus gastroenteritis in institutions. Microbiological laboratories should be aware of the importance of collecting specimens during the acute phase (i.e., within 48-72 hours after onset) of illness.
PubMed ID
12523187 View in PubMed
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Chlamydia testing in practice - requisitioners and patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287779
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 10 17;137(19)
Publication Type
Article
Date
10-17-2017
Author
Maria Romøren
Dagfinn Skaare
Nils Grude
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 10 17;137(19)
Date
10-17-2017
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - isolation & purification
Female
General Practice - statistics & numerical data
Gynecology - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Private Practice - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Secondary Care - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Unnecessary Procedures
Urinalysis - statistics & numerical data
Vaginal Smears - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Optimising the diagnostic work-up and treatment of genital chlamydia infection requires knowledge of the sampling patterns of those who order chlamydia tests. We wished to determine which groups of doctors collect specimens for chlamydia testing, and to examine the sex and age distribution of patients tested, and the proportion of positive tests, from general practitioners, gynaecologists in private practice, and youth health services.
The study includes 43 465 specimens analysed for genital infection with Chlamydia trachomatis at Vestfold Hospital Trust over the period 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2011. Data from the laboratory information system were used to classify the test requisitioners.
General practitioners requisitioned 60 % of all chlamydia tests and 63 % of all positive tests. Youth health services requisitioned 13 % of all tests and 22 % of positive tests; gynaecologists in private practice, 12 % of all tests and 5 % of positive tests. Overall, 26 % of specimens were from women over the age of 30 with 2.2 % testing positive, and 82 % of these specimens were submitted by general practitioners or gynaecologists in private practice. Twenty-three per cent of specimens were from men, and 78 % of these were collected in general practice.
Knowledge of who requisitions chlamydia testing and of whom is important for planning and improving chlamydia diagnosis, treatment and contact tracing. In this study from Norway, we found that doctors in general practice play a key role in diagnosing and treating chlamydia. The testing of women over the age of 30 by general practitioners and gynaecologists in private practice probably leads to unnecessary use of resources and should be reduced.
PubMed ID
29043753 View in PubMed
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High levels of multiresistance in quinolone resistant urinary tract isolates of Escherichia coli from Norway; a non clonal phenomen?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262171
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2014;7:376
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Linda Strand
Andrew Jenkins
Ingrid Høgli Henriksen
Anne Gry Allum
Nils Grude
Bjørn Erik Kristiansen
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2014;7:376
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Ciprofloxacin - pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial - drug effects - genetics
Escherichia coli - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - microbiology
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Nalidixic Acid - pharmacology
Norway
Phylogeny
Quinolones - pharmacology
Species Specificity
Urinary Tract - microbiology
Abstract
The problem of emerging ciprofloxacin resistance is compounded by its frequent association with multiresistance, the reason for which is not fully understood. In this study we compare multiresistance, clonal similarities and phylogenetic group in urinary tract isolates of Escherichia coli sensitive and resistant to the quinolone antimicrobials nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin.
Quinolone resistant isolates were more resistant to non-quinolone antibiotics than sensitive isolates, with resistance to ampicillin, mecillinam, sulphonamide, trimethoprim, tetracycline, kanamycin and chloramphenicol significantly increased. Fifty-one percent of quinolone-resistant isolates were multiresistant. Although multiresistance was most prevalent (63%) in isolates showing high-level ciprofloxacin resistance, it was still highly prevalent (41%) in nalidixic acid resistant isolates with low-level ciprofloxacin resistance. Multiresistance was more frequent among singleton isolates (61%) than clonal isolates (40%) of quinolone resistant Escherichia coli. Ciprofloxacin resistance was associated with certain specific clones, among them the globally distributed clonal Group A. However, there was no significant difference in the overall degree of clonality between quinolone sensitive and resistant isolates. Ciprofloxacin resistance was positively associated with phylogroup D and negatively associated with phylogroup B2. This correlation was not associated with clonal isolates.
This study supports earlier findings of association between ciprofloxacin resistance and resistance to other antibiotics. The prevalence of multiresistance in quinolone-resistant isolates that have not yet developed high-level ciprofloxacin resistance suggest that multiresistance arises early in the development of quinolone resistance. This is consistent with exposure to quinolones causing quinolone resistance by mutations and mobilization of multiresistance elements by induction of the SOS response. The spread of clones seems to be less important than previously reported in regard to emergence of quinolone resistance and multiresistance as both are associated primarily with singleton isolates.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24941949 View in PubMed
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[How to stop multiresistant bacteria?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135258
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2011 Apr 8;131(7):698-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-8-2011

Incidence and antibiotic treatment of erythema migrans in Norway 2005-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287361
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2017 Jan;8(1):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Knut Eirik Eliassen
Dag Berild
Harald Reiso
Nils Grude
Karen Sofie Christophersen
Cecilie Finckenhagen
Morten Lindbæk
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2017 Jan;8(1):1-8
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Lyme Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
The first stage of Lyme borreliosis (LB) is mainly the typical skin lesion, erythema migrans (EM), which is estimated to comprise 80-90% of all LB cases. However, the reporting of, and the actual incidence of LB varies throughout Europe. Studies from Sweden and Holland have found EM incidences varying from 53 to 464 EM/100,000 inhabitants/year. Under-reporting of LB is common and a coefficient of three to reach a realistic estimate is suggested. In Norway, it is mandatory to report only the second and third LB stages to the National Institute of Public Health. To find the Norwegian incidence of EM, we extracted data from the electronic medical records of regular general practitioners and out-of-hours services in the four counties with the highest rates of registered LB in the 5 years from 2005 to 2009. We found an EM incidence of 448 EM/100,000 inhabitants/year in these counties, which yields a national incidence of 148 EM/100,000 inhabitants/year. Our findings show that solitary EMs comprised almost 96% of the total LB incidence in Norway. Older females have the highest rates of EM. Phenoxymethylpenicillin is the most commonly used drug to treat EM in Norway, which complies with the national guidelines for antibiotic use. Antibody tests are performed in 15% of cases. Less than 1% of patients are referred to secondary care. The study also shows a high number of patients seeking care for tick bites without signs of infection and there is an overuse of antibiotics in these patients.
PubMed ID
27475874 View in PubMed
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[Increasing antibiotic resistance in urinary tract infections].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169756
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Apr 6;126(8):1058-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-6-2006
Author
Hilde K Skudal
Nils Grude
Bjørn-Erik Kristiansen
Author Affiliation
AS Telelab, Mikrobiologisk avdeling, Postboks 1868 Gulset, 3703 Skien. hilde.skudal@akersykehus.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Apr 6;126(8):1058-60
Date
Apr-6-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Infective Agents, Urinary - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Escherichia coli Infections - drug therapy - urine
Humans
Inpatients
Norway
Outpatients
Retrospective Studies
Urinary Tract Infections - drug therapy - microbiology - urine
Abstract
There is increasing focus on the development of bacterial antibiotic resistance.
We conducted a retrospective study of urine samples from patients resident in a Norwegian county, comparing 9121 samples culture-positive in 2003-04 with 28 066 samples in 1997-99. Determination of resistance was done with the MAST automatic multipoint inoculator system.
Escherichia coli was found in 68% and 56% of out-patient and in-patient isolates respectively. Significant declines in mecillinam sensitivity (from 96% to 94%), nitrofurantoin sensitivity (from 97% to 95%) and sulfonamide sensitivity (from 73% to 71%) in in-patient E. coli isolates were found. In out-patients we found significant reductions in sensitivity to ampicillin (from 78% to 76%) and trimethoprim (from 83% to 82%). For urinary tract infection isolates as a whole, the greatest sensitivity was observed for nitrofurantoin: 85% in in-patient isolates and 75% in out-patient isolates, but there was a significant decline in resistance to several antibiotics.
Increasing antibiotic resistance may be related to increasing antibiotic use. Mecillinam and nitrofurantoin may be considered first-choice preparations as E. coli is the dominant etiological agent and shows the greatest sensitivity to these two antibiotics.
PubMed ID
16619066 View in PubMed
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Mycoplasma pneumoniae detection causes excess antibiotic use in Norwegian general practice: a retrospective case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277719
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2015 Feb;65(631):e82-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Mats Foshaug
Maria Vandbakk-Rüther
Dagfinn Skaare
Nils Grude
Morten Lindbæk
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2015 Feb;65(631):e82-8
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Female
General practice
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medication Errors - trends
Mycoplasma pneumoniae - genetics - isolation & purification
Norway - epidemiology
Pneumonia, Mycoplasma - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
The 2011 Mycoplasma pneumoniae epidemic in Norway resulted in many GP consultations and significantly increased the prescription of macrolide antibiotics.
To investigate the signs, symptoms, course, and prescription patterns of antibiotics in patients positive for M. pneumoniae compared with patients negative for M. pneumoniae.
A retrospective case-control study using questionnaires collected from GPs in a county in Norway. A total of 212 M. pneumoniae positive and 202 control patients were included.
Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were performed on the reported findings.
Forty-eight per cent of patients positive for M. pneumoniae received an antibiotic at first consultation. Another 45% in the same group received antibiotics after the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) result was known, although these patients were not clinically different from all other patients not receiving an antibiotic at first consultation. Logistic regression analysis to evaluate independent predictors for prescription of antibiotics at first consultation showed that the following factors were significantly associated: elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) level, temperature >38.0°C, pathological findings on pulmonary auscultation, and impaired general condition. Elevated CRP level, younger age, temperature >38.0°C, short duration of symptoms, and absence of rhinitis were found to be positive predictors for M. pneumoniae infection.
A positive PCR test for M. pneumoniae tends to trigger an antibiotic prescription, irrespective of the severity of the patient's condition at first consultation. New guidelines for treatment and possibly PCR testing should be established.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25624311 View in PubMed
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New guidelines for use of antibiotics in the primary health care service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113568
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 May 28;133(10):1052-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-28-2013

18 records – page 1 of 2.