Skip header and navigation

Refine By

23 records – page 1 of 3.

The 2014 Danish references from birth to 20 years for height, weight and body mass index.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256558
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2014 Feb;103(2):214-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Jeanette Tinggaard
Lise Aksglaede
Kaspar Sørensen
Annette Mouritsen
Christine Wohlfahrt-Veje
Casper P Hagen
Mikkel G Mieritz
Niels Jørgensen
Ole D Wolthers
Carsten Heuck
Jørgen Holm Petersen
Katharina M Main
Anders Juul
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2014 Feb;103(2):214-24
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Growth Charts
Humans
Infant
Male
Reference Values
Young Adult
Abstract
To construct new Danish growth charts for 0- to 20-year-olds and to compare them with Danish references from 1982 and with World Health Organization (WHO) standards for children aged 0-5 years from 2006, by applying similar inclusion and exclusion criteria.
Anthropometric data from three contemporary Danish population-based studies were combined. References for height were based on healthy Caucasian children born at term. A total of 12,671 height measurements (8055 in boys and 4616 in girls) were included. Reference charts were developed using the generalised additive models for location, scale and shape.
From prepubertal ages, a secular increase in height was observed for both genders. The differences were most pronounced in puberty, and final heights were increased by 1.4 cm in boys and 2.9 cm in girls compared to 1982 references. In boys, but not girls an upward shift in body mass index (BMI) above median levels was found. Reference curves for height were superimposable with standard curves based on the selective WHO criteria. Danish children were longer/taller and heavier and they had larger head circumferences than those reported in the recent multiethnic WHO standards.
We recommend national implementation of these contemporary 2014 Danish references for anthropometric measurements.
PubMed ID
24127859 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between organic dietary choice during pregnancy and hypospadias in offspring: a study of mothers of 306 boys operated on for hypospadias.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120122
Source
J Urol. 2013 Mar;189(3):1077-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Jeppe Schultz Christensen
Camilla Asklund
Niels E Skakkebæk
Niels Jørgensen
Helle Raun Andersen
Troels Munch Jørgensen
Lars Henning Olsen
Anette Pernille Høyer
Jan Moesgaard
Jørgen Thorup
Tina Kold Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Urol. 2013 Mar;189(3):1077-82
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Hypospadias - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Life Style
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male - methods
Abstract
The etiology of hypospadias is poorly understood. Exposure to pesticides has been considered a risk factor, although findings are inconsistent. Diet constitutes a significant exposure route for pesticides, and pesticide residues are more frequently reported in conventional than organic food products. We examined the association between organic dietary choice during pregnancy and presence of hypospadias in the offspring.
Mothers of 306 boys operated on for hypospadias were frequency matched for geography and child birth year to 306 mothers of healthy boys in a case-control study. Telephone interviews were conducted regarding demographic and lifestyle factors, including intake and organic choice of selected food items (milk, dairy products, egg, fruit, vegetables and meat). Logistic regression models were constructed for dietary variables, and odds ratios were calculated controlling for maternal age, body mass index and alcohol consumption.
Overall organic choice of food items during pregnancy was not associated with hypospadias in the offspring. However, frequent current consumption of high fat dairy products (milk, butter) while rarely or never choosing the organic alternative to these products during pregnancy was associated with increased odds of hypospadias (adjusted OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.09-4.36).
This large case-control study of boys operated on for hypospadias suggests an association between hypospadias in the offspring and the mother not choosing the organic alternative, and having a high current intake of nonorganic butter and cheese. This finding could be due to chemical contamination of high fat dairy products. However, general lifestyle and health behavior related to choosing organic alternatives may also explain the finding.
Notes
Comment In: J Urol. 2013 Mar;189(3):798-923246851
PubMed ID
23036983 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association Between Use of Marijuana and Male Reproductive Hormones and Semen Quality: A Study Among 1,215 Healthy Young Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268197
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2015 Sep 15;182(6):473-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2015
Author
Tina Djernis Gundersen
Niels Jørgensen
Anna-Maria Andersson
Anne Kirstine Bang
Loa Nordkap
Niels E Skakkebæk
Lærke Priskorn
Anders Juul
Tina Kold Jensen
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2015 Sep 15;182(6):473-81
Date
Sep-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Incidence
Male
Marijuana Abuse - blood - epidemiology
Reproductive health
Retrospective Studies
Semen Analysis - methods
Sperm Count
Testosterone - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
A total of 1,215 young Danish men aged 18-28 years were recruited between 2008 and 2012 when they attended a compulsory medical examination to determine their fitness for military service. The participants delivered a semen sample, had a blood sample drawn, and underwent a physical examination. They responded to questionnaires including information on marijuana and recreational drug use during the past 3 months (no use, use once per week or less, or use more than once per week). A total of 45% had smoked marijuana within the last 3 months. Regular marijuana smoking more than once per week was associated with a 28% (95% confidence interval (CI): -48, -1) lower sperm concentration and a 29% (95% CI: -46, -1) lower total sperm count after adjustment for confounders. The combined use of marijuana more than once per week and other recreational drugs reduced the sperm concentration by 52% (95% CI: -68, -27) and total sperm count by 55% (95% CI: -71, -31). Marijuana smokers had higher levels of testosterone within the same range as cigarette smokers. Our findings are of public interest as marijuana use is common and may be contributing to recent reports of poor semen quality.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 2015 Sep 15;182(6):482-426283091
PubMed ID
26283092 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of in utero exposure to maternal smoking with reduced semen quality and testis size in adulthood: a cross-sectional study of 1,770 young men from the general population in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63426
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Jan 1;159(1):49-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2004
Author
Tina Kold Jensen
Niels Jørgensen
Margus Punab
Trine B Haugen
Jyrki Suominen
Birute Zilaitiene
Antero Horte
Anne-Grethe Andersen
Elisabeth Carlsen
Øystein Magnus
Valentinas Matulevicius
Ingrid Nermoen
Matti Vierula
Niels Keiding
Jorma Toppari
Niels E Skakkebaek
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. tkjensen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Jan 1;159(1):49-58
Date
Jan-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Genital Diseases, Male - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Semen - physiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Sperm Count
Testis - pathology
Abstract
Between 1996 and 1999, the authors invited all young men from five European countries who were undergoing compulsory medical examination for possible military service to participate in a study on male reproductive health. The participation rate was 19% in two cities in Denmark (n = 889), 17% in Oslo, Norway (n = 221), 13% in Turku, Finland (n = 313), 14% in Kaunas, Lithuania (n = 157), and 19% in Tartu, Estonia (n = 190). Each man provided a semen sample, was examined by a physician, and, in collaboration with his mother, completed a questionnaire about general and reproductive health, current smoking habits, and exposure to smoking in utero. After adjustment for confounding factors, men exposed to smoking in utero had a reduction in sperm concentration of 20.1% (95% confidence interval (CI): 6.8, 33.5) and a reduction in total sperm count of 24.5% (95% CI: 9.5, 39.5) in comparison with unexposed men. Percentages of motile and morphologically normal sperm cells were 1.85 (95% CI: 0.46, 3.23) and 0.64 (95% CI: -0.02, 1.30) percentage points lower, respectively, among men exposed in utero, and exposed men had a 1.15-ml (95% CI: 0.66, 1.64) smaller testis size. The associations were present when data from the study centers were analyzed separately (though not in Lithuania, where only 1% of mothers smoked during pregnancy), although the strength of the association varied. Maternal smoking may have long-term implications for the reproductive health of the offspring. This is another good reason to advise pregnant women to avoid smoking.
PubMed ID
14693659 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of sleep disturbances with reduced semen quality: a cross-sectional study among 953 healthy young Danish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114893
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2013 May 15;177(10):1027-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2013
Author
Tina Kold Jensen
Anna-Maria Andersson
Niels Erik Skakkebæk
Ulla Nordstrøm Joensen
Martin Blomberg Jensen
Tina Harmer Lassen
Loa Nordkap
Inge Alhmann Olesen
Åse Marie Hansen
Naja Hulvej Rod
Niels Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Winsloewsparken 17, Odense, Denmark. tkjensen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2013 May 15;177(10):1027-37
Date
May-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Humans
Male
Semen - physiology
Semen Analysis
Sleep Disorders - physiopathology
Young Adult
Abstract
Several studies have found an association between sleep duration and morbidity and mortality, but no previous studies have examined the association between sleep disturbances and semen quality. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 953 young Danish men from the general population who were recruited in Copenhagen at the time of determination of fitness for military service between January 2008 and June 2011. All of the men delivered a semen sample, had a blood sample drawn, underwent a physical examination, and answered a questionnaire including information about sleep disturbances. Sleep disturbances were assessed on the basis of a modified 4-item version of the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire, which includes questions on sleep patterns during the past 4 weeks. Sleep disturbances showed an inverse U-shaped association with sperm concentration, total sperm count, percent motile and percent morphologically normal spermatozoa, and testis size. Men with a high level of sleep disturbance (score >50) had a 29% (95% confidence interval: 2, 48) lower adjusted sperm concentration and 1.6 (95% confidence interval: 0.3, 3.0) percentage points' fewer morphologically normal spermatozoa than men with a sleep score of 11-20. This appears to be the first study to find associations between sleep disturbances and semen quality. In future studies, investigators should attempt to elucidate mechanistic explanations and prospectively assess whether semen quality improves after interventions restoring a normal sleeping pattern.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 2013 May 15;177(10):1038-4123568595
PubMed ID
23568594 View in PubMed
Less detail

Caffeine intake and semen quality in a population of 2,554 young Danish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144645
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr 15;171(8):883-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2010
Author
Tina Kold Jensen
Shanna H Swan
Niels E Skakkebaek
Sanne Rasmussen
Niels Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
University Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. tkjensen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr 15;171(8):883-91
Date
Apr-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Caffeine - adverse effects
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Drinking Behavior
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Male
Men
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Semen
Semen Analysis
Sperm Count
Sperm Motility
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The authors examined the association between semen quality and caffeine intake among 2,554 young Danish men recruited when they were examined to determine their fitness for military service in 2001-2005. The men delivered a semen sample and answered a questionnaire including information about caffeine intake from various sources, from which total caffeine intake was calculated. Moderate caffeine and cola intakes (101-800 mg/day and 14 0.5-L bottles/week) and/or caffeine (>800 mg/day) intake was associated with reduced sperm concentration and total sperm count, although only significant for cola. High-intake cola drinkers had an adjusted sperm concentration and total sperm count of 40 mill/mL (95% confidence interval (CI): 32, 51) and 121 mill (95% CI: 92, 160), respectively, compared with 56 mill/mL (95% CI: 50, 64) and 181 mill (95% CI: 156, 210) in non-cola-drinkers, which could not be attributed to the caffeine they consumed because it was
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Jun 15;171(12):132420507902
PubMed ID
20338976 View in PubMed
Less detail

CAG repeat length in androgen-receptor gene and reproductive variables in fertile and infertile men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191829
Source
Lancet. 2002 Jan 5;359(9300):44-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-5-2002
Author
Ewa Rajpert-De Meyts
Henrik Leffers
Jørgen H Petersen
Anne Grethe Andersen
Elisabeth Carlsen
Niels Jørgensen
Niels E Skakkebaek
Source
Lancet. 2002 Jan 5;359(9300):44-6
Date
Jan-5-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Humans
Infertility, Male - genetics
Male
Receptors, Androgen - blood - genetics
Risk factors
Sperm Count
Trinucleotide Repeats - genetics
Abstract
Several reports implicated a relation between the trinucleotide (CAG) repeat length in the androgen-receptor gene and male infertility, whereas others failed to find an association. We investigated the CAG repeat length in relation to sperm production and reproductive hormones in 119 infertile men and 110 men with proven fertility. We found no difference in the distribution of CAG repeat lengths between the groups and no association with reproductive parameters. This finding suggests that, within the normal range of 14-33 repeats, there is no biological link between the CAG repeat length and fertility. This lack of association was comfirmed by an analysis of the data from all previously published European studies (in total 674 infertile men and 660 controls).
PubMed ID
11809188 View in PubMed
Less detail

Compass: a hybrid method for clinical and biobank data mining.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257981
Source
J Biomed Inform. 2014 Feb;47:160-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
K. Krysiak-Baltyn
T. Nordahl Petersen
K. Audouze
Niels Jørgensen
L. Angquist
S. Brunak
Author Affiliation
Center for Biological Sequence Analysis, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
J Biomed Inform. 2014 Feb;47:160-70
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Biological Specimen Banks
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Data Mining - methods
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infertility, Male - epidemiology
Information Storage and Retrieval
Male
Phenotype
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Toxicogenetics
Abstract
We describe a new method for identification of confident associations within large clinical data sets. The method is a hybrid of two existing methods; Self-Organizing Maps and Association Mining. We utilize Self-Organizing Maps as the initial step to reduce the search space, and then apply Association Mining in order to find association rules. We demonstrate that this procedure has a number of advantages compared to traditional Association Mining; it allows for handling numerical variables without a priori binning and is able to generate variable groups which act as "hotspots" for statistically significant associations. We showcase the method on infertility-related data from Danish military conscripts. The clinical data we analyzed contained both categorical type questionnaire data and continuous variables generated from biological measurements, including missing values. From this data set, we successfully generated a number of interesting association rules, which relate an observation with a specific consequence and the p-value for that finding. Additionally, we demonstrate that the method can be used on non-clinical data containing chemical-disease associations in order to find associations between different phenotypes, such as prostate cancer and breast cancer.
PubMed ID
24513869 View in PubMed
Less detail

Correlations between phthalate metabolites in urine, serum, and seminal plasma from young Danish men determined by isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140989
Source
J Anal Toxicol. 2010 Sep;34(7):400-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Hanne Frederiksen
Niels Jørgensen
Anna-Maria Andersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. hanne.01.frederiksen@rh.regionh.dk
Source
J Anal Toxicol. 2010 Sep;34(7):400-10
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - analysis
Chromatography, Liquid - methods
Denmark
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Male
Phthalic Acids - analysis - metabolism
Plasticizers - analysis - metabolism
Semen - chemistry
Tandem Mass Spectrometry - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Phthalates are suspected of endocrine disrupting effects. We aimed to develop an analytical method for simultaneous determination of several phthalate metabolites in human urine, serum, and seminal plasma and to study correlations between levels of metabolites in these matrices. Thirteen metabolites were determined in samples from 60 young Danish men. Metabolites of common di-ester phthalates were detected in most urine samples. Summed di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) metabolites were excreted in urine in the highest amount (median = 91.1 ng/mL), followed by monoethyl phthalate (MEP), mono-iso-butyl phthalate (MiBP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP), mono-benzyl phthalate (MBzP), and finally summed di-isononyl phthalate (DiNP) metabolites. All these metabolite levels correlated significantly, indicating that when a participant was highly exposed to one phthalate he was also highly exposed to other phthalates. Several metabolites were also detectable in serum and in seminal plasma, although in much lower levels. Significant correlations between MEP and MiBP levels in serum and urine were observed, showing that serum levels could be used as biomarkers of human exposure. For DEHP and DiNP metabolites, correlations between urine and serum levels were only observed for mono(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl) phthalate (MECPP) and mono-(4-methyl-7-carboxyheptyl) phthalate (MCiOP), indicating that these secondary carboxylated metabolites were better serum markers than primary metabolites [mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) and mono-iso-nonyl phthalate (MiNP)]. In seminal plasma, only MEP levels correlated significantly to levels in urine and in serum.
PubMed ID
20822678 View in PubMed
Less detail

Estimated daily intake and hazard quotients and indices of phthtalate diesters for young danish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264140
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014;48(1):706-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Selma K Kranich
Hanne Frederiksen
Anna-Maria Andersson
Niels Jørgensen
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014;48(1):706-12
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Androgen Antagonists - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Denmark
Dibutyl Phthalate - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - analysis
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Pollutants - administration & dosage - analysis
Humans
Male
No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level
Phthalic Acids - administration & dosage - analysis - toxicity - urine
Specimen Handling
Young Adult
Abstract
Because of wide exposure to phthalates, we investigated whether simultaneous exposure to several phthalates reached levels that might cause adverse antiandrogenic effects. Thirty three healthy young Danish men each delivered three 24-h urine samples during a three months period. The daily intakes of the sum of di-n-butyl and di-iso-butyl phthalate, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, di-iso-nonyl phthalate, and butylbenzyl phthalate were estimated based on urinary excretion of the metabolites. Based on a hazard quotient (HQ) of the individual phthalate (i.e., the ratio between the daily intake and an acceptable level of exposure), a hazard index (HI) for each man was calculated as the sum of HQs for the individual phthalates. All men were exposed to all phthalates during the urine collection periods. Median HIs were all below 1 (i.e., below an acceptable cumulative threshold) ranging from 0.11 to 0.17 over the three different sample collections. Of the 33 men, 2 men had HIs above 1 in one of their three samples, indicating that occasionally the combined exposure to the investigated phthalates reached a level that may not be considered safe. Besides the phthalates investigated here, humans are exposed to numerous other chemicals that also may contribute to a cumulative antiandrogenic exposure.
PubMed ID
24228837 View in PubMed
Less detail

23 records – page 1 of 3.