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Adverse life events as risk factors for behavioural and emotional problems in a 7-year follow-up of a population-based child cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113742
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;68(3):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Cathrine Skovmand Rasmussen
Louise Gramstrup Nielsen
Dorthe Janne Petersen
Erik Christiansen
Niels Bilenberg
Author Affiliation
Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Department, Mental Health Hospital and University Clinic, Region of Southern Denmark, University of Southern Denmark , Sdr. Boulevard 29, DK-5000 Odense C , Denmark.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;68(3):189-95
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Divorce - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Change Events
Logistic Models
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - etiology - psychology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to identify risk factors for significant changes in emotional and behavioural problem load in a community-based cohort of Danish children aged 9-16 years, the risk factors being seven parental and two child-related adverse life events.
Data on emotional and behavioural problems was obtained from parents filling in the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) when the child was 8-9 and again when 15 years old. Data on risk factors was drawn from Danish registers. Analysis used was logistic regression for crude and adjusted change.
Parental divorce significantly raised the odds ratio of an increase in emotional and behavioural problems; furthermore, the risk of deterioration in problem behaviour rose significantly with increasing number of adverse life events. By dividing the children into four groups based on the pathway in problem load (increasers, decreasers, high persisters and low persisters), we found that children with a consistently high level of behavioural problems also had the highest number of adverse life events compared with any other group.
Family break-up was found to be a significant risk factor. This supports findings in previous studies. The fact that no other risk factor proved to be of significance might be due to lack of power in the study. Children experiencing high levels of adverse life events are at high risk of chronic problem behaviour. Thus these risk factors should be assessed in daily clinical practice.
PubMed ID
23692285 View in PubMed
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Bowel function in Danish children with myelomeningocele.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30827
Source
APMIS Suppl. 2003;(109):81-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Klaus Krogh
Harald R Lie
Niels Bilenberg
Søren Laurberg
Author Affiliation
Surgical Research Unit, Department of Surgery L, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. www.krogh@akh.aaa.dk
Source
APMIS Suppl. 2003;(109):81-5
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Defecation - physiology
Denmark
Fecal Incontinence - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Intestine, Large - physiopathology
Male
Meningomyelocele - physiopathology
Abstract
Spinal cord lesions affect colorectal motility, anorectal sensation and anal sphincter function. The aim of this study was to describe bowel habits in children with Myelomeningocele (MMC). Questionnaires describing age, gender, neurological deficit, bowel function and the Child Behaviour Checklist were send to all Danish children with MMC aged 2-18 years. Among 208 patients, 125 (60%; 63 girls) responded. Defecation was described as abnormal in 85 (68%). Digital stimulation or evacuation were used by 25 (20%), suppositories by 13 (10%) and enemas 35 by (28%). Time spent at each defecation was > 30 minutes in 29 (24%). Among children aged four years or more (n = 100), daily faecal incontinence was reported by 14 (14%) and weekly incontinence by another 14 (14%). Bowel dysfunction had some or major impact on social activities or quality of life in 48 (40%). Time spent on defecation increased and the impact on quality of life became more severe with advancing age. Information about bowel management had been given to 56% of parents and 9% of children. In conclusion colorectal problems are common in children with MMC and their impact of quality of life becomes more severe as the children grow older. There is an unfullfilled need for information about bowel management.
PubMed ID
12874955 View in PubMed
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The Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 1.5-5 (CBCL/1(1/2)-5): assessment and analysis of parent- and caregiver-reported problems in a population-based sample of Danish preschool children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98326
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 May 4;64(3):203-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-4-2010
Author
Solvejg Kristensen
Tine Brink Henriksen
Niels Bilenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Research unit, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. solkri@rm.dk
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 May 4;64(3):203-9
Date
May-4-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Checklist
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant
Internal-External Control
Male
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Translating
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Psychometric instruments are used increasingly within research and clinical settings, and therefore standardization has become an important prerequisite, even for investigating very young children. Currently, there are no standardized psychometric instruments available for assessment of preschool children in Denmark. AIMS: The aim was to achieve Danish national norm scores for the Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 1(1/2)-5 (CBCL/1(1/2)-5) and the Caregiver Report Form (C-TRF). METHODS: The study was based on an age- and gender-stratified cohort sample of 1750 children aged 1(1/2)-5 years born at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. The CBCL/1(1/2)-5 and C-TRF were mailed to parents, who were asked to pass on the C-TRF to the preschool caregiver. The national standard register data gave access to information on socio-economic status, family type, ethnicity and parental educational level for analysis of participation and representation. RESULTS: A total number of 850 (49%) families replied, and 624 caregivers replied. The mean Total Problem Score (TPS) with 95% confidence interval was 17.3 (16.3-18.3) for parents' reports. Age-and gender-specific scale score findings for Danish preschoolers and schoolchildren were comparable. No differences were found in the mean TPS within subgroups related to parental socio-demographic features. CONCLUSION: On the basis of a large sample, Danish national norm scores and profiles of the ASEBA Preschool Forms were established; the scores of descendents must, however, be assessed with some caution. With this reservation, the CBCL/1(1/2)-5 and C-TRF forms are now available in Danish and can be recommended for use in clinical and research settings.
PubMed ID
20085433 View in PubMed
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A Danish population-based twin study on autism spectrum disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114015
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 Jan;23(1):35-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Claudia Nordenbæk
Meta Jørgensen
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Niels Bilenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Odense, University of Southern Denmark, Sdr. Boulevard 29, 5000, Odense C, Denmark, claudia@dadlnet.dk.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 Jan;23(1):35-43
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Checklist
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - diagnosis - ethnology - genetics
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Intelligence Tests - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Registries
Regression Analysis
Twins - genetics
Abstract
Genetic epidemiological studies of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) based on twin pairs ascertained from the population and thoroughly assessed to obtain a high degree of diagnostic validity are few. All twin pairs aged 3-14 years in the nationwide Danish Twin Registry were approached. A three-step procedure was used. Five items from the "Child Behaviour Checklist" (CBCL) were used in the first screening phase, while screening in the second phase included the "Social and Communication Questionnaire" and the "Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire". The final clinical assessment was based on "gold standard" diagnostic research procedures including diagnostic interview, observation and cognitive examination. Classification was based on DSM-IV-TR criteria. The initial sample included 7,296 same-sexed twin pairs and, after two phases of screening and clinical assessment, the final calculations were based on 36 pairs. The probandwise concordance rate for ASD was 95.2% in monozygotic (MZ) twins (n=13 pairs) and 4.3% in dizygotic (DZ) twins (n=23 pairs). The high MZ and low DZ concordance rate support a genetic aetiology to ASDs.
PubMed ID
23661220 View in PubMed
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Does specialization of treatment influence mortality in eating disorders?--A comparison of two retrospective cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274093
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2015 Dec 15;230(2):165-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2015
Author
Laura Al-Dakhiel Winkler
Niels Bilenberg
Kirsten Hørder
René Klinkby Støving
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2015 Dec 15;230(2):165-71
Date
Dec-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - mortality - therapy
Body mass index
Bulimia Nervosa - mortality - therapy
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Feeding and Eating Disorders - mortality - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Mortality, Premature
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Survival Rate
Abstract
Eating disorders (EDs) are psychiatric disorders associated with high morbidity and mortality. It is well established that patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) have an increased risk of premature death, whereas mortality data are lacking for the other EDs. This study aimed to establish mortality rates in a sample of ED patients (n=998) with a mean follow-up of 12 years. This was compared to previous data from the same catchment area before a multidisciplinary centre was established. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was calculated. To compare the two cohorts, adjusted crude ratios were calculated with the confounding variables: body mass index (BMI), age at referral and diagnosis. In the latest cohort the SMR for AN was 2.89 vs 11.16 in the time before our specialization. SMR for bulimia nervosa (BN) and for eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) in the latest cohort were 2.37 and 1.14 respectively. When comparing two retrospective cohorts it is not possible to draw a definite conclusion, however the present study supports that integrating a somatic unit in a multidisciplinary centre may have a favourable influence on mortality in AN.
PubMed ID
26391650 View in PubMed
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Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA)--results of a Danish field trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30605
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2003 Dec;12(6):298-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Niels Bilenberg
Author Affiliation
Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Department, Odense University Hospital, 5000 Odense C, Denmark. bilenberg@dadlnet.dk
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2003 Dec;12(6):298-302
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Disability Evaluation
Feasibility Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Program Development - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Social Adjustment
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Assessment of the effectiveness of clinical practice requires appropriate outcome measures.Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA) is a recently developed measure of outcome for use in child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS). The aims of the present study were to evaluate sensitivity to change, face validity and clinical feasibility of HoNOSCA in a Danish field trial. METHOD: A prospective design in which HoNOSCA, Global Assessment of Psychosocial Disability (GAPD) and a clinician rated global outcome measure were completed at 15 field sites. 173 patients were rated both at initial assessment and at follow-up after three months. RESULTS: HoNOSCA demonstrated satisfactory face validity. There was a strong correlation between HoNOSCA scores and GAPD scores ( r = 0.6, P
PubMed ID
14689262 View in PubMed
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Incidence and risk factors for suicide attempts in a general population of young people: a Danish register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119934
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2013 Mar;47(3):259-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Erik Christiansen
Kim Juul Larsen
Esben Agerbo
Niels Bilenberg
Elsebeth Stenager
Author Affiliation
Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Department, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. erik.christiansen@psyk.regionsyddanmark.dk
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2013 Mar;47(3):259-70
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Case-Control Studies
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Family Health
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Registries
Risk factors
Suicide, Attempted
Young Adult
Abstract
To estimate the Danish epidemiological long-term incidence rates for suicide attempts in the general population of children and adolescents, and to analyze the impact from single and multiple risk factors on the risk of suicide attempts.
We used longitudinal register data from a total cohort of all individuals born between 1983 and 1989 and living in Denmark to calculate incidence rates. From the cohort, we identified all who have attempted suicide, and matched 50 controls to each case. A nested case-control design was used to estimate the impact from risk factors on the risk for index suicide attempts. We established a link to the biological parents and identified risk factors for two generations. Risk factors were analyzed in a conditional logistic regression model.
We identified 3718 suicide attempters and 185,900 controls (189,618 individuals, aged 10-21 years). We found increasing incidence rates during the period 1994-2005, and higher incidence rates for girls and the oldest adolescents. Mental illness was the strongest independent risk factor (IRR = 4.77, CI = (4.35-5.23), p
PubMed ID
23060528 View in PubMed
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Major depressive disorder and subthreshold depression in prepubertal children from the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295535
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2016 10; 70:65-76
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2016
Author
Rikke Wesselhoeft
Einar R Heiervang
Per Kragh-Sørensen
Merete Juul Sørensen
Niels Bilenberg
Author Affiliation
Research Units of Department of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Odense and E-mental Health Odense, Mental Health Services in the Region of Southern Denmark, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2016 10; 70:65-76
Date
10-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Anxiety - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Comorbidity
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Prodromal Symptoms
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
PubMed ID
27624424 View in PubMed
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New Danish standardization of the Child Behaviour Checklist.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122906
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Jul;59(7):A4462
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Jon Henriksen
Peter Fraas Nielsen
Niels Bilenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Søndre Boulevard 29, Odense C, Denmark.
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Jul;59(7):A4462
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Checklist - standards
Child
Child Behavior
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Reference Values
Abstract
In child mental health services, the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) and related materials are internationally renowned psychometric questionnaires for assessment of children aged 6-16 years. The CBCL consists of three versions for different informants: the CBCL for parents, the Teacher's Report Form (TRF) and the Youth Self-Report (YSR) for 11-16-year-old children.
The CBCL was standardized in Denmark in 1996, but a need for renewed standardization has emerged because of an update in 2001 and possible cultural changes. We also wanted to increase the response rate and the validity of the national norms.
A total of 949 children from demographically representative schools and their parents were invited to participate. Response rates were high: CBCL 84% (n = 793), TRF 99% (n = 938) and YSR 89% (n = 434). The mean total problem scores, externalizing and internalizing scores, and diagnose-specific sub-scores are presented. Compared with the 1996 standardization, parents rate their children significantly lower in problem score, and the same pattern is found in teachers' ratings. The young, however, rate themselves higher than previously. Some differences in single-item prevalence have occurred. This may indicate a change in the perception of the problems rather than a shift in psychopathology.
New norm scores and cut-off scores have been generated, and the questionnaires are now available for on-line completion.
PubMed ID
22759842 View in PubMed
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Post-traumatic stress symptoms and psychological functioning in children of parents with acquired brain injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134282
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(7-8):752-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Rikke Kieffer-Kristensen
Thomas W Teasdale
Niels Bilenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Ã?ster Farimagsgade 2A, Copenhagen, Denmark. rikke.kieffer@psy.ku.dk
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(7-8):752-60
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Brain Injuries - psychology - rehabilitation
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - etiology - psychology
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Denmark
Family Health
Female
Humans
Male
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - etiology - psychology
Abstract
The effect of parental brain injury on children has been relatively little investigated. This study examines post-traumatic stress symptoms (PSS) and psychological functioning in children with a parent with an acquired brain injury.
The participants were 35 patients with acquired brain injury, their spouses and children aged 7-14 years recruited from out-patient brain injury rehabilitation units across Denmark. Children self-reported psychological functioning using the Becks Youth Inventory (BYI) and Child Impact of Events revised (CRIES) measuring PSS symptoms. Emotional and behavioural problems among the children were also identified by the parents using the Achenbach's Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). A matched control group, consisting of 20 children of parents suffering from diabetes, was recruited from the National Danish Diabetes Register.
Post-traumatic stress symptoms above cut-off score (
PubMed ID
21604930 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.