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Accessible support for family caregivers of seniors with chronic conditions: from isolation to inclusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168465
Source
Can J Aging. 2006;25(2):179-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Miriam Stewart
Alison Barnfather
Anne Neufeld
Sharon Warren
Nicole Letourneau
Lili Liu
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nusing, University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Aging. 2006;25(2):179-92
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - psychology
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Consumer Satisfaction
Female
Health education
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Social Isolation
Social Support
Stroke - psychology
Abstract
Accessible support programs can improve health outcomes for family caregivers of older relatives with a chronic condition. Over the course of 6 months, 27 experienced family caregivers provided weekly support via the telephone to 66 individuals, either new family caregivers of seniors recently diagnosed with stroke or newly vulnerable family caregivers (i.e., facing increasing demands from the deterioration of their senior relative's condition) of seniors with Alzheimer's disease. Qualitative data documented the perceived impact of the intervention, including increased satisfaction with support, coping skills, caregiving competence and confidence, and decreased caregiver burden and loneliness. Caregivers identified varied support processes that overcame support deficits in their social networks. These processes can facilitate replication in future research and inform practice, programs, and policies.
PubMed ID
16821200 View in PubMed
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The Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) cohort study: rationale and methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122539
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2014 Jan;10(1):44-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Bonnie J Kaplan
Gerald F Giesbrecht
Brenda M Y Leung
Catherine J Field
Deborah Dewey
Rhonda C Bell
Donna P Manca
Maeve O'Beirne
David W Johnston
Victor J Pop
Nalini Singhal
Lisa Gagnon
Francois P Bernier
Misha Eliasziw
Linda J McCargar
Libbe Kooistra
Anna Farmer
Marja Cantell
Laki Goonewardene
Linda M Casey
Nicole Letourneau
Jonathan W Martin
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Department of Family Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Department of Family Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Primary Health Care, University of Tilburg, Tilburg, The Netherlands Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Medical Genetics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Department of Teaching & Research Support, University of Groningen, The Netherlands Clinical & Developmental Neuropsychology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands Department of Paediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Lab Medicine and Pathology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2014 Jan;10(1):44-60
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Anthropometry
Child Development
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Multivariate Analysis
Neurons - metabolism
Nutritional Status
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study is an ongoing prospective cohort study that recruits pregnant women early in pregnancy and, as of 2012, is following up their infants to 3 years of age. It has currently enrolled approximately 5000 Canadians (2000 pregnant women, their offspring and many of their partners). The primary aims of the APrON study were to determine the relationships between maternal nutrient intake and status, before, during and after gestation, and (1) maternal mood; (2) birth and obstetric outcomes; and (3) infant neurodevelopment. We have collected comprehensive maternal nutrition, anthropometric, biological and mental health data at multiple points in the pregnancy and the post-partum period, as well as obstetrical, birth, health and neurodevelopmental outcomes of these pregnancies. The study continues to follow the infants through to 36 months of age. The current report describes the study design and methods, and findings of some pilot work. The APrON study is a significant resource with opportunities for collaboration.
PubMed ID
22805165 View in PubMed
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Brief report: an online support intervention: perceptions of adolescents with physical disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143415
Source
J Adolesc. 2011 Aug;34(4):795-800
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Miriam Stewart
Alison Barnfather
Joyce Magill-Evans
Lynne Ray
Nicole Letourneau
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing and School of Public Health, 700 University Terrace, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2T4, Canada. miriam.stewart@ualberta.ca
Source
J Adolesc. 2011 Aug;34(4):795-800
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Alberta
Attitude
Cerebral Palsy - psychology
Female
Humans
Internet
Male
Pilot Projects
Social Support
Spinal Dysraphism - psychology
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
Adolescents with cerebral palsy and spina bifida report restricted interactions with peers and gaps in social support. A pilot online support intervention offered interactions with peers. Five mentors with cerebral palsy or spina bifida and 22 adolescents with the same disabilities met weekly online for 25 group sessions over six months. Participants completed quantitative measures of loneliness, sense of community, self-perceptions, coping, and social support prior to intervention, post-intervention, and delayed post-intervention. Semi-structured qualitative interviews elicited perceptions of the intervention's impacts. Participants reported more contact with teens with disabilities, decreased loneliness, and increased social acceptance and confidence. A significant increase in sense of community was reported from post-intervention to delayed post-intervention. Encouraging qualitative findings were supported by trends in the quantitative measures. This pilot study can guide a future community-based intervention trial.
PubMed ID
20488511 View in PubMed
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Canadian mothers' perceived support needs during postpartum depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161213
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 Sep-Oct;36(5):441-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nicole Letourneau
Linda Duffett-Leger
Miriam Stewart
Kathy Hegadoren
Cindy-Lee Dennis
Christina M Rinaldi
Janet Stoppard
Author Affiliation
Canadian Research Institute for Social Policy, Faculty of Nursing, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, Canada. nicolel@unb.ca
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 Sep-Oct;36(5):441-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Attitude to Health
Choice Behavior
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Friends - psychology
Health Services Accessibility
Helping Behavior
Humans
Mothers - psychology
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
New Brunswick
Nursing Methodology Research
Peer Group
Postnatal Care - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Self-Help Groups
Social Support
Abstract
To assess the support needs, support resources, barriers to support, and preferences for support intervention for women with postpartum depression.
Multisite, exploratory, descriptive study in which qualitative data were collected on support needs, the availability of resources, perceived barriers to support, and preferences for support of women who have experienced symptoms of postpartum depression.
Conducted in Alberta and New Brunswick; mothers were interviewed individually (Alberta, n= 24; New Brunswick, n= 17) and in groups (Alberta, n= 5; New Brunswick, n= 6).
For most mothers, one-on-one support was preferred when postpartum depression is recognized. Group support should be available once the mothers start to feel better and are able to comfortably interact with other mothers in a group format. This suite of alternatives needs to be underpinned by concerted public education efforts.
PubMed ID
17880314 View in PubMed
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Deciding on surgery: supporting parents of infants with craniosynostosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185456
Source
Axone. 2003 Mar;24(3):24-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Nicole Letourneau
Susan Neufeld
Jane Drummond
Alison Barnfather
Author Affiliation
Social Support Research Program, 5-22A University Extension Centre, University of Alberta, 8303-112 Street, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2T4. nicole.letourneau@ualberta.ca
Source
Axone. 2003 Mar;24(3):24-9
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Craniosynostoses - nursing - surgery
Decision Making
Family Nursing
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Needs Assessment
Parents
Social Support
Abstract
Families face a difficult decision when choosing whether or not to have surgery for their infant with isolated craniosynostosis. While the skull deformity may not affect the child's physical health, growth, or development, it may have psychosocial impacts on a child's social-emotional development, self-esteem, and interpersonal interactions. Parents are challenged to balance surgical risks with potentially positive effects on their child's psychosocial health. The purpose of this research study was to explore parental decision-making related to surgery for isolated craniosynostosis, and to identify strategies that facilitate their decision-making. A thematic content analysis of focus group interview data revealed four themes that encapsulated the process of parental decision-making. The decision for some parents was agonizing. However, others found the decision relatively straightforward. In all cases, parents spent time thinking and gathering information. Certain critical events helped parents make their decision. Parents identified a number of strategies that would be helpful to the decision-making process.
PubMed ID
12739353 View in PubMed
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Determinants of health-service use by low-income people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172154
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Sep;37(3):104-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Miriam Stewart
Linda Reutter
Edward Makwarimba
Irving Rootman
Deanna Williamson
Kim Raine
Doug Wilson
Janet Fast
Rhonda Love
Sharon McFall
Deana Shorten
Nicole Letourneau
Karen Hayward
Jeff Masuda
William Rutakumwa
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. miriam.stewart@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Sep;37(3):104-31
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Government Agencies - economics
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Nursing Administration Research
Ontario
Poverty
Abstract
Poverty influences health status, life expectancy, health behaviours, and use of health services. This study examined factors influencing the use of health-related services by people living in poverty. In the first phase, 199 impoverished users of health-related services in 2 large Canadian cities were interviewed by their peers. In the second phase, group interviews with people living in poverty (n = 52) were conducted. Data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Diverse health-related services were used to meet basic and health needs, to maintain human contact, and to cope with life's challenges. Use of services depended on proximity, affordability, convenience, information, and providers' attitudes and behaviours. Use was impeded by inequities based on income status. To promote the health of people living in poverty, nurses and other health professionals can enhance the accessibility and quality of services, improve their interactions with people living in poverty, provide information about available programs, offer coordinated community-based services, collaborate with other sectors, and advocate for more equitable services and policies.
PubMed ID
16268092 View in PubMed
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Factors affecting postpartum depressive symptoms of adolescent mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165539
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 Jan-Feb;36(1):47-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
M Loretta Secco
Sheila Profit
Evelyn Kennedy
Audrey Walsh
Nicole Letourneau
Miriam Stewart
Author Affiliation
Joint St. FX/Cape Breton University Nursing Program, Cape Breton University, Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada. loretta_secco@capebretonu.ca
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 Jan-Feb;36(1):47-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Depression, Postpartum - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Emotions
Female
Humans
Infant Care - psychology
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Maternal Behavior
Nurse's Role
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prenatal Care
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To assess the extent that anticipated maternal emotions in response to infant care (infant care emotionality or frustration and dissatisfaction with infant crying or fussing, or both), several forms of social support, and socioeconomic status explain fourth-week postpartum depressive symptoms of adolescent mothers.
Secondary multiple regression analysis of a subset of variables from a larger longitudinal study that examined adolescent mothers and infants.
Two university teaching hospitals in Western Canada.
Convenience sample of 78 healthy adolescent mothers.
Prenatal anticipated infant care emotionality, perceived family and friend social support, socioeconomic status, enacted social support, and postpartum depressive symptoms.
Anticipated infant care emotionality (R2=.19) and socioeconomic status (R2=.07) significantly predicted postpartum depressive symptoms. Family support, friend support, and enacted social support were not significant predictors of postpartum depressive symptoms.
Nurses in various settings can assess the pregnant adolescent's anticipated infant care emotionality and socioeconomic status to determine their potential risk or vulnerability to postpartum depressive symptoms. More negative prenatal infant care emotionality was the strongest predictor of postpartum depressive symptoms. Validation of study findings with a larger, more representative sample is recommended.
PubMed ID
17238946 View in PubMed
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Global and relationship-specific perceptions of support and the development of postpartum depressive symptomatology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164365
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 May;42(5):389-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Cindy-Lee Dennis
Nicole Letourneau
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5T 1P8, Canada. cindylee.dennis@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 May;42(5):389-95
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Mental Health Services - supply & distribution
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Social Support
Abstract
A lack of social support has consistently been demonstrated to be an important modifiable risk factor for postpartum depression. As such, a greater understanding of specific support variables may assist health professionals in the development of effective preventive interventions. The purpose of this paper was two-fold: (1) to determine if women discriminated between global and relationship-specific perceptions of support, and (2) to examine the influence of global and relationship-specific perceptions of support in the immediate postpartum period on the development of depressive symptomatology at 8 weeks postpartum.
As part of a longitudinal study, a diverse sample of 594 mothers completed questionnaires that included the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and global and relationship-specific (e.g., partner, mother, and other women with children) measures of support.
Mothers clearly discriminated between global and relationship-specific perceptions of support and those with depressive symptomatology at 8 weeks had significantly lower perceptions of both global and relationship-specific support at 1-week postpartum. Using discriminant function analysis, four variables, reliable reliance from partner, nurturance from partner, attachment to other women with children, and EPDS score at 1-week postpartum, differentiated between mothers who experienced depressive symptomatology at 8 weeks and those who did not.
Relationship-specific interventions may be beneficial if they include strategies that target a positive partner relationship through preceptions of reliable alliance and feeling needed and provide opportunites for interaction with other mothers. Maternal mood at 1 week postpartum was the largest predictor of depressive symptomatology at 8 weeks.
PubMed ID
17396205 View in PubMed
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Health inequities experienced by Aboriginal children with respiratory conditions and their parents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106137
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2013 Sep;45(3):6-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Miriam Stewart
Malcolm King
Roxanne Blood
Nicole Letourneau
Jeffrey R Masuda
Sharon Anderson
Lisa Bourque Bearskin
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing and Social Support Research Program, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2013 Sep;45(3):6-27
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Inuits
Male
Social Justice
Young Adult
Abstract
Asthma and allergies are common conditions among Aboriginal children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to assess the health and health-care inequities experienced by affected children and by their parents. Aboriginal research assistants conducted individual interviews with 46 Aboriginal children and adolescents who had asthma and/or allergies (26 First Nations, 19 Métis, 1 Inuit) and 51 parents or guardians of these children and adolescents. Followup group interviews were conducted with 16 adolescents and 25 parents/ guardians. Participants reported inadequate educational resources, environmental vulnerability, social and cultural pressures, exclusion, isolation, stigma, blame, and major support deficits. They also described barriers to health-service access, inadequate health care, disrespectful treatment and discrimination by health-care providers, and deficient health insurance. These children, adolescents, and parents recommended the establishment of culturally appropriate support and education programs delivered by Aboriginal peers and health professionals.
PubMed ID
24236369 View in PubMed
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Impacts of a support intervention for low-income women who smoke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139863
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 Dec;71(11):1901-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Miriam J Stewart
Kaysi Eastlick Kushner
Lorraine Greaves
Nicole Letourneau
Denise Spitzer
Madeline Boscoe
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Faculty of Nursing, 3rd Floor Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 Dec;71(11):1901-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cities
Consumer Satisfaction
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Poverty - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Self-Help Groups
Smoking - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Social Support
Abstract
The objective of this pilot study was to implement and evaluate the impact of a support intervention tailored to the assessed support needs, resources and preferences of low-income women who smoke in three Canadian cities. The support intervention, informed by theoretical foundations, provided holistic one-to-one and group support over 14 weeks. The support intervention was facilitated by trained professional and peer facilitators. The impact was evaluated through analysis of qualitative and quantitative data collected at pre-, post-, and delayed post-test contacts. This analysis revealed that the intervention exerted positive impacts on smoking reduction/cessation, social networks, coping, and health behaviors. Participants reported satisfaction with the intervention.
Notes
Comment In: Soc Sci Med. 2010 Dec;71(11):1910-2; discussion 1912-320888107
PubMed ID
20970232 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.