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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Crustacean remains from the Yuka mammoth raise questions about non-analogue freshwater communities in the Beringian region during the Pleistocene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307224
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 01 21; 10(1):859
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-21-2020
Author
Anna N Neretina
Maria A Gololobova
Alisa A Neplyukhina
Anton A Zharov
Christopher D Rogers
David J Horne
Albert V Protopopov
Alexey A Kotov
Author Affiliation
A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Leninsky Prt. 33, Moscow, 119071, Russia.
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 01 21; 10(1):859
Date
01-21-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Crustacea
Extinction, Biological
Female
Fresh Water
Mammoths
Paleontology
Russia
Abstract
Frozen permafrost Pleistocene mammal carcasses with soft tissue remains are subject to intensive study and help elucidate the palaeoenvironment where these animals lived. Here we present an inventory of the freshwater fauna and flora found in a sediment sample from the mummified Woolly Mammoth carcass found in August 2010, from the Oyogos Yar coast near the Kondratievo River in the Laptev Sea region, Sakha (Yakutia) Republic, NE Russia. Our study demonstrates that the waterbody where the carcass was buried could be characterized as a shallow pond or lake inhabited mainly by taxa which are present in this area today, but additionally by some branchiopod crustacean taxa currently absent or unusual in the region although they exist in the arid zone of Eurasia (steppes and semi-deserts). These findings suggest that some "non-analogue" crustacean communities co-existed with the "Mammoth fauna". Our findings raise questions about the nature of the waterbodies that existed in Beringia during the MIS3 climatic optimum when the mammoth was alive.
PubMed ID
31964906 View in PubMed
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[Effective forms of the work of a pediatric polyclinic]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38268
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1989;(5):43-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
N V Ivannikova
V A Platonova
A F Neretina
R I Kitaeva
L B Kosenko
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1989;(5):43-5
Date
1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Day Care - organization & administration
English Abstract
Hospitals, Pediatric - organization & administration
Hospitals, Special - organization & administration
Humans
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - organization & administration
Ukraine
Abstract
The experience gained in the organization of a day hospital for 100 beds on the basis of a health centre of a city children's polyclinic is presented. A new organizational form has become possible due to adequate fittings with diagnostic equipment and medicaments. 1258 children were treated in the day hospital for 3 years. Thus it became possible to improve servicing of the children registered for medical supervision and to decrease the number of acute conditions by 2.5. Both parents and children approved of the feasibility of treatment in day hospitals.
PubMed ID
2740938 View in PubMed
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Excessive Parallelism in Protein Evolution of Lake Baikal Amphipod Species Flock.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305260
Source
Genome Biol Evol. 2020 Sep 01; 12(9):1493-1503
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-01-2020
Author
Valentina Burskaia
Sergey Naumenko
Mikhail Schelkunov
Daria Bedulina
Tatyana Neretina
Alexey Kondrashov
Lev Yampolsky
Georgii A Bazykin
Author Affiliation
Center of Life Sciences, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Moscow, Moscow Oblast, Russia.
Source
Genome Biol Evol. 2020 Sep 01; 12(9):1493-1503
Date
Sep-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Repeated emergence of similar adaptations is often explained by parallel evolution of underlying genes. However, evidence of parallel evolution at amino acid level is limited. When the analyzed species are highly divergent, this can be due to epistatic interactions underlying the dynamic nature of the amino acid preferences: The same amino acid substitution may have different phenotypic effects on different genetic backgrounds. Distantly related species also often inhabit radically different environments, which makes the emergence of parallel adaptations less likely. Here, we hypothesize that parallel molecular adaptations are more prevalent between closely related species. We analyze the rate of parallel evolution in genome-size sets of orthologous genes in three groups of species with widely ranging levels of divergence: 46 species of the relatively recent lake Baikal amphipod radiation, a species flock of very closely related cichlids, and a set of significantly more divergent vertebrates. Strikingly, in genes of amphipods, the rate of parallel substitutions at nonsynonymous sites exceeded that at synonymous sites, suggesting rampant selection driving parallel adaptation. At sites of parallel substitutions, the intraspecies polymorphism is low, suggesting that parallelism has been driven by positive selection and is therefore adaptive. By contrast, in cichlids, the rate of nonsynonymous parallel evolution was similar to that at synonymous sites, whereas in vertebrates, this rate was lower than that at synonymous sites, indicating that in these groups of species, parallel substitutions are mainly fixed by drift.
PubMed ID
32653919 View in PubMed
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Fast evolution from precast bricks: genomics of young freshwater populations of threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272373
Source
PLoS Genet. 2014 Oct;10(10):e1004696
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Nadezhda V Terekhanova
Maria D Logacheva
Aleksey A Penin
Tatiana V Neretina
Anna E Barmintseva
Georgii A Bazykin
Alexey S Kondrashov
Nikolai S Mugue
Source
PLoS Genet. 2014 Oct;10(10):e1004696
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological - genetics
Animals
Aquatic Organisms
Biological Evolution
Female
Fresh Water
Gene Frequency
Genetics, Population
Genome
Male
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Russia
Selection, Genetic
Smegmamorpha - genetics
Abstract
Adaptation is driven by natural selection; however, many adaptations are caused by weak selection acting over large timescales, complicating its study. Therefore, it is rarely possible to study selection comprehensively in natural environments. The threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) is a well-studied model organism with a short generation time, small genome size, and many genetic and genomic tools available. Within this originally marine species, populations have recurrently adapted to freshwater all over its range. This evolution involved extensive parallelism: pre-existing alleles that adapt sticklebacks to freshwater habitats, but are also present at low frequencies in marine populations, have been recruited repeatedly. While a number of genomic regions responsible for this adaptation have been identified, the details of selection remain poorly understood. Using whole-genome resequencing, we compare pooled genomic samples from marine and freshwater populations of the White Sea basin, and identify 19 short genomic regions that are highly divergent between them, including three known inversions. 17 of these regions overlap protein-coding genes, including a number of genes with predicted functions that are relevant for adaptation to the freshwater environment. We then analyze four additional independently derived young freshwater populations of known ages, two natural and two artificially established, and use the observed shifts of allelic frequencies to estimate the strength of positive selection. Adaptation turns out to be quite rapid, indicating strong selection acting simultaneously at multiple regions of the genome, with selection coefficients of up to 0.27. High divergence between marine and freshwater genotypes, lack of reduction in polymorphism in regions responsible for adaptation, and high frequencies of freshwater alleles observed even in young freshwater populations are all consistent with rapid assembly of G. aculeatus freshwater genotypes from pre-existing genomic regions of adaptive variation, with strong selection that favors this assembly acting simultaneously at multiple loci.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25299485 View in PubMed
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Genomic study of the Ket: a Paleo-Eskimo-related ethnic group with significant ancient North Eurasian ancestry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270114
Source
Sci Rep. 2016;6:20768
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
. Khrameeva 5,2 , Olga P. Konovalova 4 , Tatiana Neretina 4 , Yuri V. Nikolsky 6,11 , George Starostin 7,8 , Vita V. Stepanova 5,2 , Igor V. Travinsky # , Martin Tříska 9 , Petr Tříska 10 , Tatiana V. Tatarinova 2,9,12 * 1 Department of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of
  1 document  
Author
Pavel Flegontov
Piya Changmai
Anastassiya Zidkova
Maria D Logacheva
N Ezgi Altinisik
Olga Flegontova
Mikhail S Gelfand
Evgeny S Gerasimov
Ekaterina E Khrameeva
Olga P Konovalova
Tatiana Neretina
Yuri V Nikolsky
George Starostin
Vita V Stepanova
Igor V Travinsky
Martin Tríska
Petr Tríska
Tatiana V Tatarinova
Source
Sci Rep. 2016;6:20768
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
2700110
Abstract
The Kets, an ethnic group in the Yenisei River basin, Russia, are considered the last nomadic hunter-gatherers of Siberia, and Ket language has no transparent affiliation with any language family. We investigated connections between the Kets and Siberian and North American populations, with emphasis on the Mal'ta and Paleo-Eskimo ancient genomes, using original data from 46 unrelated samples of Kets and 42 samples of their neighboring ethnic groups (Uralic-speaking Nganasans, Enets, and Selkups). We genotyped over 130,000 autosomal SNPs, identified mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal haplogroups, and performed high-coverage genome sequencing of two Ket individuals. We established that Nganasans, Kets, Selkups, and Yukaghirs form a cluster of populations most closely related to Paleo-Eskimos in Siberia (not considering indigenous populations of Chukotka and Kamchatka). Kets are closely related to modern Selkups and to some Bronze and Iron Age populations of the Altai region, with all these groups sharing a high degree of Mal'ta ancestry. Implications of these findings for the linguistic hypothesis uniting Ket and Na-Dene languages into a language macrofamily are discussed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26865217 View in PubMed
Documents
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Identification of Ceriodaphnia Dana, 1853 (Crustacea: Cladocera) taxa from European Russia based on ephippial morphology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297995
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Dec 03; 4527(1):105-123
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-03-2018
Author
Alexey A Kotov
Aisylu G Ibragimova
Anna N Neretina
Author Affiliation
A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Leninsky Prospect 33, Moscow 119071, Russia.. user@example.com.
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Dec 03; 4527(1):105-123
Date
Dec-03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Cladocera
Crustacea
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Russia
Abstract
Over the last decades significant progress was achieved in the investigations of water fleas (Crustacea: Cladocera). Their morphology, taxonomy and biogeography can be considered as well-studied, but still there are genera almost ignored by taxonomists. The genus Ceriodaphnia Dana, 1853 (Cladocera: Daphniidae) belongs to such problematic groups. From previous publications, it is obvious that different taxa from the genus have a very different morphology of their ephippia. Here, we study ephippium morphology in six common taxa from central-northern European Russia (Ceriodaphnia megops Sars, 1862; C. laticaudata P.E. Müller, 1867; C. rotunda (Straus, 1820) sensu Sars, 1862; C. quadrangula (O.F. Müller, 1785); C. pulchella Sars, 1862; C. reticulata (Jurine, 1820)) using light and scanning electron microscopy. A key to their identification based on ephippium morphology is proposed. This could be the starting point for revisions based on morphological characters with special emphasis on ephippia. Also, we propose that Ceriodaphnia taxa at least from the Holocene subfossil samples could be identified to the species group level according to structure of their ephippia. This approach to identification of Ceriodaphnia remains in sediments could improve palaeoecological reconstructions. However a global revision of the genus is still needed.
PubMed ID
30651480 View in PubMed
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Molecular analysis of Spiophanes bombyx complex (Annelida: Spionidae) with description of a new species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305398
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(7):e0234238
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2020
Author
Vasily I Radashevsky
Victoria V Pankova
Vasily V Malyar
Tatyana V Neretina
Jin-Woo Choi
Seungshic Yum
Céline Houbin
Author Affiliation
National Scientific Center of Marine Biology, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok, Russia.
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(7):e0234238
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Annelida - classification - genetics
Europe
North Sea
Polychaeta - classification - genetics
Species Specificity
Abstract
Spiophanes bombyx (Claparède, 1870) from the Gulf of Naples, Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy, was the first described Spiophanes with fronto-lateral horns on the prostomium. It was also considered the only horned species occurring in European waters. Our sequence data of five gene fragments suggest the presence of two horned sibling Spiophanes species in northern Europe: S. cf. bombyx in the North and the Norwegian seas, and S. cf. convexus in Brittany, northern France, and Bay of Biscay, northern Spain. Spiophanes cf. bombyx worms are genetically close to a single examined specimen of S. bombyx from Venice Lagoon, Italy but their conspecificity should be verified by further study. Our sequence data show that horned Spiophanes from the North Pacific are genetically distant from horned European species, and that S. uschakowi Zachs, 1933, originally described from the Sea of Japan (East Sea) is a valid species. The data also suggest the presence of two horned sibling Spiophanes species in the North East Pacific: S. hakaiensis Radashevsky & Pankova, n. sp. distributed from Alaska south to about Point Conception, and S. norrisi Meißner & Blank, 2009, distributed from San Francisco Bay south to Baja California Sur, Mexico. Spiophanes from South America, morphologically similar to S. norrisi, are suggested to belong to a new species. Molecular data also suggest the presence of two sibling species among the worms from northern Europe identified by morphology as S. kroyeri Grube, 1860. Worms from the Barents Sea and northern part of the North Sea are tentatively referred to as S. cf. kroyeri; worms from the northern and central parts of the North Sea and from the Bay of Biscay, northern Spain, are tentatively referred to as S. cf. cirrata M. Sars in G.O. Sars, 1872. Sequence data also show that S. duplex from California is genetically different from morphologically similar worms from South America. The South American worms are referred to resurrected S. soederstroemi Hartman, 1953 which was originally described from off Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and then considered as a junior synonym of S. duplex. Analysis of divergence times of Spiophanes lineages suggested that the origin of the most recent common ancestor of horned Spiophanes with metameric nuchal organs was around 11.1 mya (95% HPD: 5.1-19.0 mya) and that the divergence of the North Atlantic and North Pacific lineages was around 7.9 mya (95% HPD: 4.1-13.3 mya). The North Atlantic lineage was estimated to have diverged 4.8 mya (95% HPD: 2.2-8.6 mya), resulting in the origin of S. cf. bombyx and S. cf. convexus. The North Pacific lineage was estimated to have diverged first by the isolation and speciation of S. norrisi 1.7 mya (95% HPD: 2.3-1.0 mya), and then by the isolation and speciation of S. uschakowi and S. hakaiensis n. sp. 1.3 mya (95% HPD: 2.0-0.7 mya). The estimates place the divergences soon after maximum glacial period in the North Pacific (2.4-3.0 mya).
PubMed ID
32609771 View in PubMed
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Molecular analysis of the Pygospio elegans group of species (Annelida: Spionidae).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274346
Source
Zootaxa. 2016;4083(2):239-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Vasily I Radashevsky
Victoria V Pankova
Tatyana V Neretina
Alexandra N Stupnikova
Alexander B Tzetlin
Source
Zootaxa. 2016;4083(2):239-50
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Pygospio elegans Claparède, 1863, the type species of the genus Pygospio, was originally described from Normandy, France, and later widely reported from boreal waters in the northern hemisphere. Sequence data of four gene fragments (2576 bp in total) of the mitochondrial 16S rDNA, nuclear 18S and 28S rDNA, and Histone 3 have shown that individuals from California and Oregon, USA, Scotland and the White Sea, Russia were genetically similar (the average p-distances for the combined data between the four groups ranged from 0.04 to 0.16%, average p = 0.1%). These individuals are considered to be conspecific and the amphiboreal distribution of P. elegans is here confirmed. Adult morphology of the species is briefly described and illustrated. The molecular analysis revealed two genetically distant populations, Pygospio sp. 1 from the Sea of Okhotsk and Pygospio sp. 2 from Oregon. The morphological differences and high average genetic p-distances for the combined data (ranging from 3.06 to 3.18%, average p = 3.12%) between Pygospio sp. 2 and P. elegans suggest the presence of an undescribed Pygospio species co-occurring with P. elegans in Oregon. High morphological similarity and moderate genetic p-distances for the combined data (ranging from 1 to 1.11%, average p = 1.07%) between Pygospio sp. 1 and P. elegans indicate a comparatively recent genetic divergence of the Pygospio population in the Sea of Okhotsk. Taking into account the high genetic similarity of the remote European and North American populations of P. elegans and medial location of the Pygospio sp. 1 population, we suggest the latter to belong to a separate species. However, this conclusion should be verified in further studies on the morphology, reproductive biology and genetics of this population. The present findings show the need to re-examine Pygospio from the Asian Pacific and elsewhere that have been identified as P. elegans.
PubMed ID
27394228 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.