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Association between maternal comorbidity and preterm birth by severity and clinical subtype: retrospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130750
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2011;11:67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nathalie Auger
Thi Uyen Nhi Le
Alison L Park
Zhong-Cheng Luo
Author Affiliation
Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, 190, boulevard Crémazie Est, Montréal, Québec, H2P-1E2, Canada. nathalie.auger@inspq.qc.ca
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2011;11:67
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - pathology
Pregnancy outcome
Premature Birth - epidemiology - pathology
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Young Adult
Abstract
Preterm birth (PTB) is a major cause of infant morbidity and mortality, but the relationship between comorbidity and PTB by clinical subtype and severity of gestational age remains poorly understood. We evaluated associations between maternal comorbidities and PTB by clinical subtype and gestational age.
We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 1,329,737 singleton births delivered in hospitals in the province of Québec, Canada, 1989-2006. PTB was classified by clinical subtype (medically indicated, preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM), spontaneous preterm labour) and gestational age ( 2.0). At the population level, several major comorbidities (placental abruption, chorioamnionitis, oliogohydramnios, structural abnormality, cervical incompetence) were key contributors to all clinical subtypes of PTB, especially at
Notes
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PubMed ID
21970736 View in PubMed
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Association between perceived security of the neighbourhood and small-for-gestational-age birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155264
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2008 Sep;22(5):467-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Nathalie Auger
Mark Daniel
Robert W Platt
Yuquan Wu
Zhong-Cheng Luo
Robert Choinière
Author Affiliation
Unité Etudes et Analyses de l'Etat de Santé de la Population, Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Québec, Canada. nathalie.auger@inspq.qc.ca
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2008 Sep;22(5):467-77
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Canada - epidemiology
Crime - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Models, Statistical
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban health
Abstract
Evidence points to an association between a mother's place of residence and her newborn's health, independent of individual characteristics. Neighbourhood constructs such as immigrant density, deprivation and crime have all been separately associated with birth outcomes. Little research has considered the joint influence of variables representing a spectrum of neighbourhood constructs. Subjective vs. objective measures of neighbourhood constructs (e.g. reported vs. perceived crime) are often not considered. We sought to evaluate the relationship between neighbourhood measures of reported crime, neighbourhood perceived security, immigrant density, material/social deprivation, residential stability and the odds of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) birth in an urban setting in Canada. Neighbourhood was defined as police districts (n = 49). We linked Montreal livebirths 1997-2001 (n = 98 330) to police district crime measures, survey data on perceived security, and 2001 census data. We used multi-level analysis to calculate odds ratios (OR) for neighbourhood effects on SGA birth accounting for individual characteristics. Mothers residing in neighbourhoods with the most favourable perception had a lower odds of SGA birth than neighbourhoods with the least favourable perception [OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.77, 0.97]. Mothers in neighbourhoods with lower proportions of immigrants had lower odds of SGA birth relative to neighbourhoods with the highest proportion of immigrants. Reported crime, residential stability and material/social deprivation (accounting for neighbourhood perception) were not associated with SGA birth. Immigrant density and subjective perceptions of neighbourhood security are associated with SGA birth. Public health strategies to improve fetal growth should target neighbourhoods with low perceived security and high immigrant density.
PubMed ID
18782253 View in PubMed
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Association of fast-food restaurant and fruit and vegetable store densities with cardiovascular mortality in a metropolitan population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141001
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2010 Oct;25(10):711-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Mark Daniel
Catherine Paquet
Nathalie Auger
Geng Zang
Yan Kestens
Author Affiliation
Sansom Institute for Health Research, The University of South Australia, North Terrace, Adelaide, SA, Australia. mark.daniel@unisa.edu.au
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2010 Oct;25(10):711-9
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Fast Foods - supply & distribution
Female
Fruit - supply & distribution
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Urban Population
Vegetables - supply & distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
Most studies that link neighbourhoods to disease outcomes have represented neighbourhoods as area-level socioeconomic status. Where objective contextual attributes of urban environments have been measured, few studies of food availability have evaluated mortality as an outcome. We sought to estimate associations between the availability of fast-food restaurants (FFR), fruit and vegetable stores (FVS), and cardiovascular mortality in an urban area. Food business data were extracted from a validated commercial database containing all businesses and services in the Montréal Census Metropolitan Area (MCMA). Mortality data (1999-2003) were obtained for the MCMA (3.4 million residents). Directly standardised mortality rates for cardiovascular deaths (n = 30,388) and non-cardiovascular deaths (all causes - cardiovascular deaths) (n = 91,132) and FFR and FVS densities (n/km²) were analysed for 845 census tracts. Generalised additive models and generalised linear models were used to analyse food source-mortality relationships. FVS density was not associated with cardiovascular or non-cardiovascular mortality (relative risk (RR) = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.76, 1.36, and RR = 1.14, 95% CI: 0.87, 1.50, respectively). Higher FFR density was associated with mortality in bivariate and multivariable analyses. Relative risks of death (95% CI) per 10% increase in FFR density were similar for both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality: 1.39 (1.19, 1.63) and 1.36 (1.18, 1.57), respectively, accounting for socio-demographic covariates. FFR density is associated with cardiovascular mortality but this relationship is no different in magnitude than that for non-cardiovascular mortality. These results together with null associations between FVS density and mortality do not support a major role for food source availability in cardiovascular outcomes.
PubMed ID
20821254 View in PubMed
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The Balanced Scorecard: a tool for health policy decision-making.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179722
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 May-Jun;95(3):233-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nathalie Auger
Denis A Roy
Author Affiliation
Community Medicine Residency Program, McGill University, Direction de Santé Publique de Montréal-Centre. nauger@santepub-mtl.qc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 May-Jun;95(3):233-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Emigration and Immigration
Health Policy
Humans
Quebec
Regional Health Planning - methods
Rural Population
Urban Population
PubMed ID
15191139 View in PubMed
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[Beauty and smoking: the utilization of public health programs in the prevention of tobacco use disorders].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160454
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):400-1
Publication Type
Article
Author
Christine Lacroix
Nathalie Auger
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC. c-lacroix@videotron.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):400-1
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beauty
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Public Health - methods
Quebec
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - prevention & control
Social Marketing
Tobacco Use Disorder - complications - prevention & control
Abstract
Research in tobacco prevention is increasingly showing that anti-smoking campaigns aimed at youth work. However, not all interventions are effective, and some have had unintended harmful effects, even to the point of increasing tobacco use by youth. In this commentary, we discuss potentials risks associated with interventions poorly supported by the evidence, using the example of tobacco prevention campaigns that focus on the effects of smoking on beauty. We conclude with two points: 1) the importance of using strategies based on evidence, and 2) the importance of rigorous evaluation of innovative strategies.
PubMed ID
17985683 View in PubMed
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Causes of widening life expectancy inequalities in Qu├ębec, Canada, 1989-2004.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130130
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Sep-Oct;102(5):375-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jessica Adam-Smith
Sam Harper
Nathalie Auger
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montréal, QC. jessica.adam-smith@mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Sep-Oct;102(5):375-81
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Infant
Life Expectancy - trends
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Quebec - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Inequalities in life expectancy between the most and least materially deprived areas in the province of Quebec, Canada are increasing, but the reasons for this trend are unclear. An analysis of which causes of death, in which age groups, are implicated in this trend is necessary to understand it and provide clear targets for intervention.
We analyzed Quebec mortality data for three 4-year periods from 1989-2004. Differences in life expectancy at birth between the most- and least-deprived areas in each period and over time were decomposed by age and cause of death for men and women using the Arriaga method.
Life expectancy increased for all areas, but the increase was smaller in deprived areas. Cancer, heart disease and unintentional injuries accounted for the largest shares of inequality in each period. Among women, the widening life expectancy gap was largely due to increased lung cancer mortality. Among men, mortality from HIV was an important cause of widening inequality. Increasing inequality in both sexes was offset by a decrease in mortality from unintentional injuries in deprived areas (narrowing the gap between the most- and least-deprived areas). The largest share of inequality among women was due to deaths in the 65-and-over age group. Among men, the largest share shifted over time from middle-age to the 65-and-over age group.
The widening life expectancy gap between advantaged and disadvantaged areas in Quebec is driven by relatively few causes of death with well-known risk factors and strategies for prevention.
PubMed ID
22032105 View in PubMed
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Children and youth perceive smoking messages in an unbranded advertisement from a NIKE marketing campaign: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135452
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2011;11:26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nathalie Auger
Mark Daniel
Bärbel Knäuper
Marie-France Raynault
Barry Pless
Author Affiliation
Institut national de santé publique du Québec, 190, boulevard Crémazie Est, Montréal, Québec H2P 1E2, Canada. nathalie.auger@inspq.qc.ca
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2011;11:26
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Advertising as Topic
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Cluster analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Marketing
Mass Media
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Perception
Sports
Students - psychology
Visual perception
Abstract
How youth perceive marketing messages in sports is poorly understood. We evaluated whether youth perceive that the imagery of a specific sports marketing advertisement contained smoking-related messages.
Twenty grade 7 to 11 classes (397 students) from two high schools in Montréal, Canada were recruited to participate in a cluster randomised single-blind controlled trial. Classes were randomly allocated to either a NIKE advertisement containing the phrase 'LIGHT IT UP' (n = 205) or to a neutral advertisement with smoking imagery reduced and the phrase replaced by 'GO FOR IT' (n = 192). The NIKE logo was removed from both advertisements. Students responded in class to a questionnaire asking open-ended questions about their perception of the messages in the ad. Reports relating to the appearance and text of the ad, and the product being promoted were evaluated.
Relative to the neutral ad, more students reported that the phrase 'LIGHT IT UP' was smoking-related (37.6% vs. 0.5%) and that other parts of the ad resembled smoking-related products (50.7% vs. 10.4%). The relative risk of students reporting that the NIKE ad promoted cigarettes was 4.41 (95% confidence interval: 2.64-7.36; P
Notes
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PubMed ID
21477307 View in PubMed
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Contribution of local area deprivation to cultural-linguistic inequalities in foetal growth restriction: trends over time in a Canadian metropolitan centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114577
Source
Health Place. 2013 Jul;22:38-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Nathalie Auger
Alison L Park
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
Institut national de santé publique du Québec, 190, boul. Crémazie E, Montréal, Canada H2P 1E23. nathalie.auger@inspq.qc.ca
Source
Health Place. 2013 Jul;22:38-47
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Culture
Female
Fetal Development
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Language
Minority Groups
Poverty Areas
Quebec
Residence Characteristics
Social Class
Urban Population
Young Adult
Abstract
This study investigated temporal trends in heterogeneity of foetal growth restriction across neighbourhood deprivation levels for two culturally distinct communities (Anglophones and Francophones) in a North American metropolitan centre. Inequalities in foetal growth restriction related to deprivation fell from 1989 to 2008 for Francophones, but initial improvements for Anglophones later reversed with a rise in poor foetal growth in the most materially disadvantaged and, unexpectedly, advantaged areas as well. Inequalities in foetal growth restriction related to neighbourhood material deprivation may be emerging in this minority Anglophone population. Potential mechanisms underlying these trends are discussed, as well as implications for perinatal health policy.
PubMed ID
23603425 View in PubMed
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Contribution of maternal age to preterm birth rates in Denmark and Quebec, 1981-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108020
Source
Am J Public Health. 2013 Oct;103(10):e33-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Nathalie Auger
Anne V Hansen
Laust Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Nathalie Auger is with the Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Montreal, Canada; the Research Centre of the University of Montreal Hospital Centre, Montreal; and the Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal. Anne V. Hansen and Laust Mortensen are with the Section of Social Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2013 Oct;103(10):e33-8
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
We sought evidence to support the hypothesis that advancing maternal age is potentially causing a rise in preterm birth (PTB) rates in high-income countries.
We assessed maternal age-specific trends in PTB using all singleton live births in Denmark (n = 1 674 308) and Quebec (n = 2 291 253) from 1981 to 2008. We decomposed the country-specific contributions of age-specific PTB rates and maternal age distribution to overall PTB rates over time.
PTB rates increased from 4.4% to 5.0% in Denmark and from 5.1% to 6.0% in Quebec. Rates increased the most in women aged 20 to 29 years, whereas rates decreased or remained stable in women aged 35 years and older. The overall increase over time was driven by age-specific PTB rates, although the contribution of younger women was countered by fewer births at this age in both Denmark and Quebec.
PTB rates increased among women aged 20 to 29 years, but their contribution to the overall PTB rates was offset by older maternal age over time. Women aged 20 to 29 years should be targeted to reduce PTB rates, as potential for prevention may be greater in this age group.
PubMed ID
23947312 View in PubMed
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Disparities and Trends in Birth Outcomes, Perinatal and Infant Mortality in Aboriginal vs. Non-Aboriginal Populations: A Population-Based Study in Quebec, Canada 1996-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266411
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0138562
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lu Chen
Lin Xiao
Nathalie Auger
Jill Torrie
Nancy Gros-Louis McHugh
Hamado Zoungrana
Zhong-Cheng Luo
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0138562
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Aboriginal populations are at substantially higher risks of adverse birth outcomes, perinatal and infant mortality than their non-Aboriginal counterparts even in developed countries including Australia, U.S. and Canada. There is a lack of data on recent trends in Canada.
We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study (n = 254,410) using the linked vital events registry databases for singleton births in Quebec 1996-2010. Aboriginal (First Nations, Inuit) births were identified by mother tongue, place of residence and Indian Registration System membership. Outcomes included preterm birth, small-for-gestational-age, large-for-gestational-age, low birth weight, high birth weight, stillbirth, neonatal death, postneonatal death, perinatal death and infant death.
Perinatal and infant mortality rates were 1.47 and 1.80 times higher in First Nations (10.1 and 7.3 per 1000, respectively), and 2.37 and 4.46 times higher in Inuit (16.3 and 18.1 per 1000, respectively) relative to non-Aboriginal (6.9 and 4.1 per 1000, respectively) births (all p
Notes
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PubMed ID
26397838 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.