Skip header and navigation

Refine By

6 records – page 1 of 1.

5-aminosalicylic acid dependency in Crohn's disease: a Danish Crohn Colitis Database study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138932
Source
J Crohns Colitis. 2010 Nov;4(5):575-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Dana Duricova
Natalia Pedersen
Margarita Elkjaer
Jens K Slott Jensen
Pia Munkholm
Author Affiliation
Clinical and Research Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease, ISCARE a.s. and Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. dana.duricova@seznam.cz
Source
J Crohns Colitis. 2010 Nov;4(5):575-81
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Crohn Disease - drug therapy
Denmark
Drug Utilization
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Mesalamine - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The role of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) in Crohn's disease is unclear. The outcome of the first course of 5-ASA monotherapy with emphasis on 5-ASA dependency was retrospectively assessed in consecutive cohort of 537 Crohn's disease patients diagnosed 1953-2007.
Following outcome definitions were used: Immediate outcome (30 days after 5-ASA start) defined as complete/partial response (total regression/improvement of symptoms) and no response (no regression of symptoms with a need of corticosteroids, immunomodulator or surgery). Long-term outcome defined as prolonged response (still in complete/partial response 1 year after induction of response); 5-ASA dependency (relapse on stable/reduced dose of 5-ASA requiring dose escalation to regain response or relapse =1 year after 5-ASA cessation regaining response after 5-ASA re-introduction).
One hundred sixty-five (31%) patients had monotherapy with 5-ASA. In 50% 5-ASA monotherapy was initiated =1 year after diagnosis (range 0-49 years). Complete/partial response was obtained in 75% and no response in 25% of patients. Thirty-six percent had prolonged response, 23% developed 5-ASA dependency and 38% were non-responders in long-term outcome. Female gender had higher probability to develop prolonged response or 5-ASA dependency (OR 2.89, 95%CI: 1.08-7.75, p=0.04). The median duration (range) of 5-ASA monotherapy was 34 months (1-304) in prolonged responders, 63 (6-336) in 5-ASA dependent and 2 (0-10) in non-responders.
A selected phenotype of Crohn's disease patients may profit from 5-ASA. Fifty-nine percent of patients obtained long-term benefit with 23% becoming 5-ASA dependent. Prospective studies are warranted to assess the role of 5-ASA in Crohn's disease.
PubMed ID
21122562 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alpha-defensin DEFA1A3 gene copy number elevation in Danish Crohn's disease patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133471
Source
Dig Dis Sci. 2011 Dec;56(12):3517-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Cathrine Jespersgaard
Peder Fode
Marianne Dybdahl
Ida Vind
Ole Haagen Nielsen
Claudio Csillag
Pia Munkholm
Ben Vainer
Lene Riis
Margarita Elkjaer
Natalia Pedersen
Elisabeth Knudsen
Paal Skytt Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Immunology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Dig Dis Sci. 2011 Dec;56(12):3517-24
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Crohn Disease - blood - epidemiology - genetics
DNA Copy Number Variations
Denmark - epidemiology
Gene Dosage
Gene Expression Regulation
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Peptides, Cyclic - biosynthesis - genetics
Prevalence
RNA, Messenger - genetics
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Risk factors
alpha-Defensins - biosynthesis - genetics
Abstract
Extensive copy number variation is observed for the DEFA1A3 gene encoding alpha-defensins 1-3. The objective of this study was to determine the involvement of alpha-defensins in colonic tissue from Crohn's disease (CD) patients and the possible genetic association of DEFA1A3 with CD.
Two-hundred and forty ethnic Danish CD patients were included in the study. Reverse transcriptase PCR assays determined DEFA1A3 expression in colonic tissue from a subset of patients. Immunohistochemical analysis identified alpha-defensin peptides in colonic tissue. Copy number of DEFA1A3 and individual alleles, DEFA1 and DEFA3, were compared with those for controls, by use of combined real-time quantitative PCR and pyrosequencing, and correlated with disease location.
Inflammatory-dependent mRNA expression of DEFA1A3 (P
PubMed ID
21701837 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effectiveness of anti-tumour necrosis factor-a therapy in Danish patients with inflammatory bowel diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268292
Source
Dan Med J. 2015 Mar;62(3)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Steffen Bank
Paal Skytt Andersen
Johan Burisch
Natalia Pedersen
Stine Roug
Julie Galsgaard
Stine Ydegaard Turino
Jacob Broder Brodersen
Shaista Rashid
Sara Avlund
Thomas Bastholm Olesen
Anders Green
Hans Jürgen Hoffmann
Marianne Kragh Thomsen
Vibeke Østergaard Thomsen
Bjørn Andersen Nexø
Ulla Vogel
Vibeke Andersen
Source
Dan Med J. 2015 Mar;62(3)
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adalimumab - therapeutic use
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Cohort Studies
Colitis, Ulcerative - drug therapy
Crohn Disease - drug therapy
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infliximab - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - antagonists & inhibitors
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor-a (anti-TNF) treatment in a large cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) in clinical practice and to establish a cohort for future studies of genetic markers associated with treatment response.
A national, clinically based cohort of previously naïve anti-TNF treated patients from 18 medical departments was established. The patients were screened for tuberculosis prior to treatment initiation. By combining the unique personal identification number of Danish citizens (the CPR number) from blood samples with data from the National Patient Registry, patients with International Classification of Diseases, Version 10 (ICD-10) codes K50-K63 were identified. Treatment efficacy reflected the maximum response within 22 weeks.
Among 492 patients with CD and 267 patients with UC, 74%/13%/14% and 65%/12%/24% were responders, partial responders and non-responders to anti-TNF therapy, respectively. More patients with UC than with CD were non-responders (odds ratio (OR) = 1.96, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.34-2.87, p = 0.001). Young age was associated with a beneficial response (p = 0.03), whereas smoking = 10 cigarettes/day was associated with non-response among patients with CD (OR = 2.33, 95% CI: 1.13-4.81, p = 0.03).
In this clinically based cohort of Danish patients with IBD treated with anti-TNF, high response rates were found. Heavy smoking was associated with non-response, whereas young age at treatment initiation was associated with a beneficial response among patients with CD. Thus, the results obtained in this cohort recruited from clinical practice were similar to those previously obtained in clinical trials.
The work was funded by Health Research Fund of Central Denmark Region, Colitis-Crohn Foreningen and the University of Aarhus (PhD grant).
Clinicaltrials NCT02322008.
PubMed ID
25748864 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ehealth: low FODMAP diet vs Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in irritable bowel syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265921
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Nov 21;20(43):16215-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-21-2014
Author
Natalia Pedersen
Nynne Nyboe Andersen
Zsuzsanna Végh
Lisbeth Jensen
Dorit Vedel Ankersen
Maria Felding
Mette Hestetun Simonsen
Johan Burisch
Pia Munkholm
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Nov 21;20(43):16215-26
Date
Nov-21-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted
Dietary Carbohydrates - metabolism
Feasibility Studies
Female
Fermentation
Humans
Internet
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - diagnosis - diet therapy - metabolism - microbiology
Lactobacillus rhamnosus - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Dropouts
Probiotics - therapeutic use
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the effects of a low fermentable, oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols diet (LFD) and the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
Randomised, unblinded controlled trial on the effect of 6-wk treatment with LFD, LGG or a normal Danish/Western diet (ND) in patients with IBS fulfilling Rome III diagnostic criteria, recruited between November 2009 and April 2013. Patients were required to complete on a weekly basis the IBS severity score system (IBS-SSS) and IBS quality of life (IBS-QOL) questionnaires in a specially developed IBS web self-monitoring application. We investigated whether LFD or LGG could reduce IBS-SSS and improve QOL in IBS patients.
One hundred twenty-three patients (median age 37 years, range: 18-74 years), 90 (73%) females were randomised: 42 to LFD, 41 to LGG and 40 to ND. A significant reduction in mean ? SD of IBS-SSS from baseline to week 6 between LFD vs LGG vs ND was revealed: 133 ? 122 vs 68 ? 107, 133 ? 122 vs 34 ? 95, P
Notes
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2014 Apr;27 Suppl 2:263-7523909813
Cites: World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Jan 21;20(3):829-4224574756
Cites: World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Jun 7;20(21):6680-424914395
Cites: World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Jun 14;20(22):6759-7324944467
Cites: World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Jun 28;20(24):7570-8624976697
Cites: J Clin Gastroenterol. 2015 Apr;49(4):300-524637731
Cites: Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2000 Jan;12(1):39-4310656208
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2000 Apr;95(4):974-8010763947
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2000 Apr;95(4):999-100710763950
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2003 Jan;98(1):122-712526947
Cites: Psychol Med. 1997 Mar;27(2):363-709089829
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 1997 Apr;11(2):395-4029146781
Cites: Dig Dis Sci. 1998 Feb;43(2):400-119512138
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2005 Jun 15;21(12):1399-40915948806
Cites: Gut. 2006 May;55(5):643-816099784
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Oct;106(10):1631-917000196
Cites: World J Gastroenterol. 2008 May 7;14(17):2650-6118461650
Cites: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008 Jul;6(7):765-7118456565
Cites: Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2009 Jul;57(3):279-9219459089
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2009 Jan;104 Suppl 1:S1-3519521341
Cites: Gut. 2010 Mar;59(3):325-3219091823
Cites: J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Feb;25(2):252-820136989
Cites: J Clin Gastroenterol. 2009 Mar;43(3):214-2019623100
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2010 Apr;31(8):874-8220102355
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2010 Aug;32(4):513-2120497137
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Oct;110(10):1469-7620869485
Cites: Gut. 2010 Dec;59(12):1652-6121071584
Cites: Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2011 Feb;8(2):76-821293507
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2011 Mar;70(3):278-8521334499
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2011 Jun;33(12):1302-1021507030
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2011 Nov;34(9):1079-8721899584
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012;5:CD00511122592702
Cites: J Nutr. 2012 Aug;142(8):1510-822739368
Cites: Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 2012 Sep;41(3):629-3722917168
Cites: BMJ. 2012;345:e583622951548
Cites: Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013 Jan;10(1):13-2323147658
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2012 Nov;36(9):840-922971016
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2013 May;144(5):903-911.e323357715
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2013 May;108(5):718-2723545709
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2013 May;108(5):707-1723588241
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2013 Sep;38(5):467-7623841880
Cites: Int J Clin Pract. 2013 Sep;67(9):895-90323701141
Cites: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2013 Oct;48(10):1127-3523957590
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2013 Oct;38(8):864-8623981066
Cites: Intern Med J. 2013 Oct;43(10):1067-7424134168
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2014 Jan;146(1):67-75.e524076059
Cites: J Zhejiang Univ Sci B. 2014 Jun;15(6):590-724903997
PubMed ID
25473176 View in PubMed
Less detail

EHealth: self-management in inflammatory bowel disease and in irritable bowel syndrome using novel constant-care web applications. EHealth by constant-care in IBD and IBS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276133
Source
Dan Med J. 2015 Dec;62(12):B5168
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Natalia Pedersen
Source
Dan Med J. 2015 Dec;62(12):B5168
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Colitis, Ulcerative - drug therapy
Crohn Disease - drug therapy
Denmark
Diet Therapy - methods
Disease Progression
Feasibility Studies
Feces - chemistry
Female
Gastrointestinal Agents - therapeutic use
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - psychology - therapy
Infliximab - therapeutic use
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - psychology - therapy
Leukocyte L1 Antigen Complex - analysis
Male
Mesalamine - therapeutic use
Patient compliance
Self Care - methods - psychology
Severity of Illness Index
Software
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are chronic gastrointestinal disorders of unknown aetiology of increasing incidence and changing disease activity or severity. Approximately 60-80% of IBD patients suffer from IBS. Monitoring and treatment goals of IBD are to optimise the disease course by prolonging remission periods and preventing or shortening periods of active disease. Constant-care web-monitoring and treatment approaches with active patient involvement have been proven effective in UC, increasing patients' adherence and improving the disease outcomes.  
To assess the feasibility and efficacy of the novel constant-care eHealth applications in: i) CD patients treated with infliximab (IFX), ii) UC patients with active disease on mesalazine, iii) IBS patients and iv) IBD patients with IBS on a low FODMAP diet (LFD).  
New constant-care web applications www.cd.constant-care.dk, www.meza.constant-care.dk and www.ibs.constant-care.dk in IBD patients were developed and assessed in this thesis. An integrated inflammatory burden measure of disease activity, consisting of a subjective (clinical indices) and of an objective (faecal calprotectin) part and a treatment guide to drug doses and intervals, was incorporated into the web applications and used by patients.
Web-guided IFX treatment in CD demonstrated patients' inter- and intra-individual variability in infusion intervals and provided patients with individualised treatment according to their needs. Web-guided treatment with multimatrix mesalazine was efficacious in a majority of UC patients with mild-to-moderate disease activity. Web-guided IBS-monitoring in IBD and in IBS patients on LFD was shown to be a feasible method that actively involved patients in their disease management and had a positive short-term impact on the disease. Moreover, the new constant-care concepts were demonstrated to be safe and to have a positive impact on quality of life and adherence to treatment and helped to reduce the costs.  
The novel constant-care web applications have proven feasible in improving the disease outcomes in CD patients on IFX, in UC patients on mesalazine, and in monitoring IBS. These applications are expected to be implemented in the clinical practice of gastroenterology in Denmark in the coming years. Future studies will help to assess whether the natural disease course can be improved in the long-term.
PubMed ID
26621403 View in PubMed
Less detail

Infliximab dependency is related to decreased surgical rates in adult Crohn's disease patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141255
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Oct;22(10):1196-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Natalia Pedersen
Dana Duricova
Martin Lenicek
Margarita Elkjaer
Martin Bortlik
Paal Skytt Andersen
Libor Vitek
Bogi Davidsen
Vibeke Wewer
Milan Lukas
Pia Munkholm
Author Affiliation
Gastroenterology Unit, Medical Section, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark. natalia.pedersen@zeniavej.dk
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Oct;22(10):1196-203
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage
Crohn Disease - drug therapy - genetics - surgery
Czech Republic
Denmark
Digestive System Surgical Procedures - utilization
Female
Gastrointestinal Agents - administration & dosage
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Predictive value of tests
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Infliximab dependency in children with Crohn's disease (CD) has recently been described and found to be associated with a decreased surgery rate.
To assess infliximab dependency of adult CD patients, evaluate the impact on surgery, and search for possible clinical and genetic predictors.
Two hundred and forty-five CD patients treated with infliximab were included from Danish and Czech Crohn Colitis Database (1999-2006). Infliximab response was assessed as immediate outcome, 1 month after infliximab start: complete, partial, and no response. Three months outcome, after last intended infusion: prolonged response (maintenance of complete/partial response), infliximab dependency (relapse requiring repeated infusions to regain complete/partial response or need of infliximab >12 months to sustain response).
Forty-seven percent obtained prolonged response, 29% were infliximab dependent and 24% nonresponders. The cumulative probability of surgery 40 months after infliximab start was 20% in prolonged responders, 23% in infliximab-dependent patients and 76% in nonresponders (P
PubMed ID
20739896 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.