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48 records – page 1 of 5.

Adolescent dietary phytoestrogen intake and breast cancer risk (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166482
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2006 Dec;17(10):1253-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Joanne Thanos
Michelle Cotterchio
Beatrice A Boucher
Nancy Kreiger
Lilian U Thompson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont, Canada.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2006 Dec;17(10):1253-61
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Breast Neoplasms - diet therapy - prevention & control
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Humans
Odds Ratio
Phytoestrogens - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
It has been suggested that dietary phytoestrogen intake during adolescence may reduce the risk of developing breast cancer. This population-based case-control study evaluated the association between adolescent dietary phytoestrogen intake and adult breast cancer risk among women in Ontario, Canada.
Pathology-confirmed, population-based breast cancer cases, aged 25-74 years, diagnosed between June 2002 and April 2003, were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry. Population-based controls were recruited, and matched to cases within 5-year age groups. Adolescent phytoestrogen intake was obtained using a brief food frequency questionnaire (n = 3,024 cases, n = 3,420 controls). Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Higher phytoestrogen intake (both isoflavones and lignans) during adolescence was associated with a reduced breast cancer risk, and a monotonic trend was observed from the lowest to the highest quartile (OR [Q2] = 0.91, 95% CI 0.79-1.04, OR[Q3] = 0.86, 95% CI 0.75-0.98, and OR[Q4] = 0.71, 95% CI 0.62-0.82, p-trend
PubMed ID
17111256 View in PubMed
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An examination of at-home food preparation activity among low-income, food-insecure women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183147
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Nov;103(11):1506-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Carey McLaughlin
Valerie Tarasuk
Nancy Kreiger
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Nov;103(11):1506-12
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cooking - methods
Diet
Energy intake
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Services
Food Supply
Health promotion
Humans
Hunger
Income
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Poverty
United States
Women's health
Abstract
A secondary analysis of data from a study of nutritional vulnerability among 153 women in families seeking charitable food assistance was undertaken to estimate the extent and nutritional significance of at-home food preparation activity for these women. At-home food preparation was estimated from women's reported food intakes from three 24-hour recalls. The relationships between food preparation and energy and nutrient intake, food intake, and 30-day household food security status were characterized. Almost all participants (97%) consumed foods prepared from scratch at least once during the three days of observation; 57% did so each day. Both the frequency and complexity of at-home food preparation were positively related to women's energy and nutrient intakes and their consumption of fruits and vegetables, grain products, and meat and alternates. The intakes by women in households with food insecurity with hunger reflected less complex food preparation but no less preparation from scratch than women in households where hunger was not evident, raising questions about the extent to which food skills can protect very poor families from food insecurity and hunger. Our findings indicate the need for nutrition professionals to become effective advocates for policy reforms to lessen economic constraints on poor households.
PubMed ID
14576717 View in PubMed
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An invitation to develop Ontario's cancer research platform: report of the Ontario cancer cohort workshop.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166840
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2006;27(2):94-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Fredrick D Ashbury
Victoria A Kirsh
Nancy Kreiger
Scott T Leatherdale
John R McLaughlin
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2006;27(2):94-7
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical research
Cohort Studies
Education
Health promotion
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Ontario
PubMed ID
17073023 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant medication use and breast cancer risk: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182324
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Dec;32(6):961-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Allan Steingart
Michelle Cotterchio
Nancy Kreiger
Margaret Sloan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Dec;32(6):961-6
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Fibrocystic Breast Disease - complications
Humans
Menopause
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Parity
Abstract
Animal and human studies have reported an association between antidepressant (AD) medication use and breast cancer risk. A population-based case-control study was designed specifically to examine this association among women in Ontario, Canada.
The Ontario Cancer Registry (OCR) identified women diagnosed with primary breast cancer. Controls, randomly sampled from the female population of Ontario, were frequency matched by 5-year age groups. A mailed self-administered questionnaire included questions about lifetime use of AD and potential confounders. Multivariate logistic regression yielded odds ratio estimates.
'Ever' use of AD was reported by 14% (441/3077) cases versus 12% (372/2994) controls. The age-adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for 'ever' use was 1.17, (95% CI: 1.01, 1.36). An increased risk was also observed for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors = 1.33 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.66), Sertraline = 1.58 (95% CI: 1.03, 2.41), and Paroxetine = 1.55 (95% CI: 1.00, 2.40). None of the 30 variables assessed for confounding altered the risk estimate by more than 10%. Multivariate adjustment including all possible breast cancer risk factors yielded an unchanged, but not significant, point estimate (MVOR = 1.2, 95% CI: 0.96, 1.51). No relationship was observed for duration or timing of AD use.
A modest association between 'ever' use of AD and breast cancer was found using the most parsimonious multivariate model. OR estimates did not change, but CI were widened and statistical significance lost, after adjustment for factors associated with breast cancer risk.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Dec;32(6):966-714681257
PubMed ID
14681256 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant medication use and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma risk: no association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178524
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Sep 15;160(6):566-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2004
Author
Saira Bahl
Michelle Cotterchio
Nancy Kreiger
Neil Klar
Author Affiliation
Division of Preventive Oncology, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Sep 15;160(6):566-75
Date
Sep-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Animals
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - classification
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Chi-Square Distribution
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Disease Models, Animal
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - chemically induced - classification - epidemiology
Male
Medical History Taking
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Registries
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
Animal and human studies have suggested that antidepressant medications may be associated with several cancers. The authors evaluated the association between antidepressant medication use and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma using a Canadian population-based case-control study, the National Enhanced Cancer Surveillance Study. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cases (n=638) diagnosed in 1995-1996 were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry, and controls (n=1,930) were identified from the Ontario Ministry of Finance Property Assessment Database. Antidepressant medication use was ascertained using a self-administered questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. "Ever" use of antidepressant medications was not associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma risk. The odds ratio for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with 25 or more months of tricyclic antidepressant medication use was 1.6; however, this was nonsignificant. Duration or history of use or individual types of antidepressant medications were not associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma risk. These findings do not support an increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with antidepressant medication use.
PubMed ID
15353417 View in PubMed
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Antihistamine use and breast cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184647
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Sep 10;106(4):566-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-2003
Author
Victoria Nadalin
Michelle Cotterchio
Nancy Kreiger
Author Affiliation
Division of Preventive Oncology, Research Unit, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. victoria.nadalin@cancercare.on.ca
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Sep 10;106(4):566-8
Date
Sep-10-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Histamine H1 Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Antihistamines are structurally similar to DPPE, a tamoxifen derivative known to promote tumor growth, and to antidepressants. Animal experiments have linked certain antihistamines and antidepressants with enhanced tumor growth in mice. The few epidemiologic studies examining antihistamine use have not indicated an increased risk. In light of suggestive animal data, structural similarities between antihistamines and DPPE, the widespread use of antihistamines, and the lack of epidemiologic investigation into their use and breast cancer risk, it is important to examine this issue. Female cases aged 25-74 years, diagnosed 1996 to 1998, were identified through the Ontario Cancer Registry. Controls were a random, age-matched sample of women. Cases (n=3,133) and controls (n=3,062) completed a mailed questionnaire that included questions about antihistamines used regularly (undefined), type and duration. Age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained using logistic regression. Antihistamine users were at no increased risk for breast cancer (OR=0.93, 95% CI: 0.81, 1.06), and no trend in risk was observed for age starting or duration of use. Antihistamine users were at no increased risk. No confounding or effect modification was identified in multivariate modeling. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that women who use antihistamines are at a greater breast cancer risk than those who do not.
PubMed ID
12845653 View in PubMed
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Benzodiazepines and risk for breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171223
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;16(8):632-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Erika Halapy
Nancy Kreiger
Michelle Cotterchio
Margaret Sloan
Author Affiliation
Division of Preventive Oncology, Cancer Care Ontario, Canada.
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;16(8):632-6
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Anxiety Agents - adverse effects
Benzodiazepines - adverse effects
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Carcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Random Allocation
Risk factors
Abstract
The study aim is to evaluate benzodiazepine use and risk for breast cancer in Ontario, Canada, by using a population-based case-control study design.
Cases were a random sample of women aged 25 to 74 years identified through the Ontario Cancer Registry and diagnosed with breast cancer between 1996 and 1998 (n = 3133). Controls were an age-matched random sample of women (n = 3062). Cases and controls completed a self-administered questionnaire that included questions about their past use of benzodiazepines (defined as daily use for at least 2 months) and potential confounders. Individual classes of benzodiazepines also were evaluated. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated.
Compared with nonusers, ever use of benzodiazepines was not significantly associated with risk for breast cancer (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.88-1.27). No apparent trends were observed for duration of use, time since first use, or time since last use. Estimates according to individual classes of benzodiazepines, including diazepam, lorazepam, and chlordiazepoxide, also were not statistically significant.
Our data show no association between benzodiazepine use and breast cancer risk. Results confirm findings from previous studies that diazepam use does not increase the risk for breast cancer and also suggest no association with the use of other benzodiazepine compounds.
PubMed ID
16406246 View in PubMed
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Calcium and vitamin D intake and mortality: results from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113637
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013 Jul;98(7):3010-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Lisa Langsetmo
Claudie Berger
Nancy Kreiger
Christopher S Kovacs
David A Hanley
Sophie A Jamal
Susan J Whiting
Jacques Genest
Suzanne N Morin
Anthony Hodsman
Jerilynn C Prior
Brian Lentle
Millan S Patel
Jacques P Brown
Tassos Anastasiades
Tanveer Towheed
Robert G Josse
Alexandra Papaioannou
Jonathan D Adachi
William D Leslie
K Shawn Davison
David Goltzman
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013 Jul;98(7):3010-8
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Sex Characteristics
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
Calcium and vitamin D are recommended for bone health, but there are concerns about adverse risks. Some clinical studies suggest that calcium intake may be cardioprotective, whereas others report increased risk associated with calcium supplements. Both low and high serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D have been associated with increased mortality.
The purpose of this study was to determine the association between total calcium and vitamin D intake and mortality and heterogeneity by source of intake.
The Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study cohort is a population-based longitudinal cohort with a 10-year follow-up (1995-2007).
This study included randomly selected community-dwelling men and women.
A total of 9033 participants with nonmissing calcium and vitamin D intake data and follow-up were studied.
Total calcium intake (dairy, nondairy food, and supplements) and total vitamin D intake (milk, yogurt, and supplements) were recorded.
The outcome variable was all-cause mortality.
There were 1160 deaths during the 10-year period. For women only, we found a possible benefit of higher total calcium intake, with a hazard ratio of 0.95 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-1.01) per 500-mg increase in daily calcium intake and no evidence of heterogeneity by source; use of calcium supplements was also associated with reduced mortality, with hazard ratio of 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.66-0.92) for users vs nonusers with statistically significant reductions remaining among those with doses up to 1000 mg/d. These associations were not modified by levels of concurrent vitamin D intake. No definitive associations were found among men.
Calcium supplements, up to 1000 mg/d, and increased dietary intake of calcium may be associated with reduced risk of mortality in women. We found no evidence of mortality benefit or harm associated with vitamin D intake.
PubMed ID
23703722 View in PubMed
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Calibration of the dietary questionnaire for the Canadian Study of Diet, Lifestyle and Health cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186699
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2003 Feb;6(1):79-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Meera G Jain
Thomas E Rohan
Colin L Soskolne
Nancy Kreiger
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. meera.jain@utoronto.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2003 Feb;6(1):79-86
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calibration
Canada
Cohort Studies
Diet
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
For proper interpretation of results from epidemiological studies that use food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs), it is necessary to know the relationship between reported intakes from the FFQ and true usual intake. In this paper, we report a calibration study conducted to investigate the performance of the FFQ used in a cohort study, the Canadian Study of Diet, Lifestyle and Health.
Over a 1-year period, 151 men and 159 women completed a full set of questionnaires including a self-administered baseline FFQ, three 24-hour diet recalls administered by telephone, and a second FFQ self-administered subsequently. The association between the nutrient estimates derived from the FFQs and the diet recalls was evaluated by calculating deattenuated Pearson's correlation coefficients.
FFQs estimated mean daily nutrient intakes higher than the diet recalls. When the log-transformed and energy-adjusted nutrient intakes from the average of three 24-hour recalls were compared against the baseline FFQ, the following deattenuated correlations were obtained in men and women, respectively: total energy 0.44 and 0.32, total fat 0.64 and 0.68, saturated fat 0.68 and 0.70, dietary fibre 0.65 and 0.44, vitamin E 0.32 and 0.37, vitamin C 0.40 and 0.37, beta-carotene 0.34 and 0.29, alcohol 0.74 and 0.67, caffeine 0.81 and 0.76, with a median correlation of 0.49 and 0.53. Correlations between the second FFQ and diet recalls were similar. The correlations between the two FFQs as a test of reliability had a median value 0.64 for men and 0.63 for women for selected nutrients.
The study suggests that the FFQ method gives acceptable levels of nutrients or food component estimates, as assessed by this calibration study against diet recalls, when limited to energy-adjusted and deattenuated values.
PubMed ID
12581469 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Study of Diet, Lifestyle, and Health: design and characteristics of a new cohort study of cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165122
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 2007;31(1):12-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Thomas E Rohan
Colin L Soskolne
Kenneth K Carroll
Nancy Kreiger
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. rohan@aecom.yu.edu
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 2007;31(1):12-7
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Diet
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health
Health Behavior
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Questionnaires
Research Design
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
We have established a new cohort study, the Canadian Study of Diet, Lifestyle, and Health, to investigate the relationship between diet, lifestyle factors, molecular markers, and cancer incidence in Canada.
The cohort was established predominantly by recruiting alumni from the Universities of Alberta, Toronto, and Western Ontario between 1995 and 1998, but also includes a small contingent recruited mostly in 1992 through the Canadian Cancer Society. Participants completed baseline lifestyle and food frequency questionnaires, measured waist and hip circumferences, and provided hair and toenail specimens.
Seventy-three thousand nine hundred and nine individuals (34,291 males and 39,618 females) were recruited, with representation from all Canadian provinces and territories; 97% provided biological specimens. The mean (S.D.) ages of the male and female participants at recruitment were 51.6 (15.6) and 46.1 (15.2) years, respectively. Data from a random sample of the study subjects at baseline show that approximately one-half of the males and one-third of the females were overweight (BMI>or=25kg/m(2)), and approximately one-quarter of all participants reported that they walked at least 4h/week. Mean (S.D.) daily caloric intake was 2341 (697)kcal for males and 2091 (612)kcal for females.
Given the rich repository of questionnaire and biological data, and an average follow-up time for cohort members of 10.4 years, the study is poised to make a major Canadian contribution towards understanding the roles of diet, lifestyle factors, and molecular markers in influencing cancer risk.
PubMed ID
17303348 View in PubMed
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48 records – page 1 of 5.