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'Making a difference': A new care paradigm for pregnant and parenting Aboriginal people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161103
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;98(4):321-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Dawn A Smith
Nancy C Edwards
Patricia J Martens
Colleen Varcoe
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Room 3251b-451 Smyth Rd, Ottawa, ON K1H 8M5. dsmith@uottawa.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;98(4):321-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Parenting
Perinatal Care - standards
Postnatal Care - standards
Pregnancy
Abstract
To describe community-based stakeholders' views of how safe and responsive care "makes a difference" to health and well-being for pregnant and parenting Aboriginal people. Community-based stakeholders included community members, providers of health and social care, and health care and community leaders.
A postcolonial standpoint, participatory research principles and a case-study design were used to investigate two Aboriginal organizations' experiences improving care for pregnant and parenting Aboriginal people. Data were collected through researcher field notes, exploratory interviews and small group discussions with purposively selected community-based leaders, members and providers. Data were analyzed using an interpretive descriptive method.
Community participants' views of "making a difference" emphasized: recognizing relevant outcomes of care; acknowledging progress over time; and using a strengths-based approach in which providers appreciate individuals' efforts and the challenges of their contextual circumstances.
"Making a difference" to pregnant and parenting Aboriginal people would facilitate Aboriginal peoples' efforts to tackle the deeply embedded socio-historical determinants of well-being and capacity, and thus shift priorities for care upstream to focus on such determinants. Such a paradigm for care would integrate multiple perspectives on desirable outcomes within local frameworks based on values and priorities of Aboriginal parents, while also incorporating the benefits and wisdom of existing yet further downstream approaches to care.
Design and evaluation of care based on community values and priorities and using a strengths-based approach can improve early access to and relevance of care during pregnancy and parenting for Aboriginal people.
PubMed ID
17896745 View in PubMed
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People and money matter: investment lessons from the Ontario Heart Health Program, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159758
Source
Health Promot Int. 2008 Mar;23(1):24-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Barbara L Riley
Nancy C Edwards
Josie R d'Avernas
Author Affiliation
Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation, Lyle S. Hallman Institute N, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1. briley@healthy.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Health Promot Int. 2008 Mar;23(1):24-34
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - economics - prevention & control
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Community-Institutional Relations
Financing, Organized
Health Care Rationing - economics - organization & administration
Health Promotion - economics - organization & administration
Humans
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Public Health Practice - economics
Abstract
Resource allocation is a critical issue for public health decision-makers. Yet little is known about the level and type of resources needed to build capacity to plan and implement comprehensive programs. This paper examines the relationships between investments and changes in organizational capacity and program implementation in the first phase (1998-2003) of the Ontario Heart Health Program (OHHP)--a province-wide, comprehensive public health program that involved 40 community partnerships. The study represents a subset of findings from a provincial evaluation. Investments, organizational capacity of public health units and implementation of heart health activities were measured longitudinally. Investment information was gathered annually from the provincial government, local public health units and community partners using standard reports, and was available from 1998 to 2002. Organizational capacity and program implementation were measured using a written survey, completed by all health units at five measurement times from 1994 to 2002. Combining provincial and local sources, the average total investment by year five was $1.66 per capita. Organizational capacity of public health units and implementation of heart health activities increased both before and during the first 2 years of the OHHP, and then plateaued at a modest level for capacity and a low level for implementation after that. Amount of funding was positively associated with organizational capacity, yet this association was overpowered by the negative influence of turnover of a key staff position. Regression analysis indicated that staff turnover explained 23% of local variability in organizational capacity. Findings reinforce the need for adequate investment and retention of key staff positions in complex partnership programs. Better accounting of public health investments, including monetary and in-kind investments, is needed to inform decisions about the amount and duration of public health investments that will lead to effective program implementation.
PubMed ID
18086687 View in PubMed
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Population and public health ethics in Canada: a snapshot of current national initiatives and future issues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128881
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Nov-Dec;102(6):410-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sarah M Viehbeck
Ryan Melnychuk
Christopher W McDougall
Heather Greenwood
Nancy C Edwards
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institutes of Health Research - Institute of Population and Public Health, Ottawa, ON. Sarah.Viehbeck@uottawa.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Nov-Dec;102(6):410-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Capacity building
Disaster Planning - standards
Disease Outbreaks - ethics - prevention & control
Health Policy
Health Promotion - ethics - standards
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Population Surveillance
Public Health - ethics
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
To date, some work has been undertaken to define a code and stewardship framework for public health ethics. However, gaps in our understanding and application of ethics to the field of population and public health (PPH) remain. This paper presents the approach to building capacity for PPH ethics by three national-level organizations: the Canadian Institutes of Health Research-Institute of Population and Public Health, the National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy, and the Public Health Agency of Canada. By first looking at each of the organizations' respective activities and then across organizations, we synthesize our common approaches, highlight future directions and pose questions aimed at stimulating dialogue about the role of, and challenges confronting, the emerging field of PPH ethics in Canada.
PubMed ID
22164547 View in PubMed
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Population health intervention research in Canada: catalyzing research through funding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125975
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2011 Dec;43(4):93-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Nancy C Edwards
Sarah M Viehbeck
Erica Di Ruggiero
Meghan McMahon
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2011 Dec;43(4):93-8
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Financing, Government
Health Policy - economics
Health Services Research - economics - trends
Humans
Public Health - economics
Research Support as Topic
PubMed ID
22435310 View in PubMed
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Revisiting our social justice roots in population health intervention research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145026
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Nov-Dec;100(6):405-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nancy C Edwards
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing and Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Nov-Dec;100(6):405-8
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Promotion - history
Health Services Research
Healthcare Disparities
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Public Health
Social Justice - history
PubMed ID
20209730 View in PubMed
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Social justice and core competencies for public health: improving the fit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157381
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Mar-Apr;99(2):130-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nancy C Edwards
Colleen MacLean Davison
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing and Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON. nedwards@uottawa.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Mar-Apr;99(2):130-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Human Rights - standards
Humans
Professional Competence
Public Health - standards
Social Class
Social Justice
Abstract
Social justice is a core value of public health. However, the public health core competencies for Canada document (release 1.0) does not contain any explicit reference to the essential attributes of social justice within the competencies themselves. We argue that social justice attributes should be integrated into the core competencies and propose examples for consideration.
PubMed ID
18457288 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.