Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Health care provider communication: an empirical model of therapeutic effectiveness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117011
Source
Cancer. 2013 May 1;119(9):1706-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2013
Author
Harvey M Chochinov
Susan E McClement
Thomas F Hack
Nancy A McKeen
Amanda M Rach
Pierre Gagnon
Shane Sinclair
Jill Taylor-Brown
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. harvey.chochinov@cancercare.mb.ca
Source
Cancer. 2013 May 1;119(9):1706-13
Date
May-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cancer Care Facilities - manpower
Communication
Empirical Research
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - therapy
Professional-Patient Relations
Abstract
Patients who are facing life-threatening and life-limiting cancer almost invariably experience psychological distress. Responding effectively requires therapeutic sensitivity and skill. In this study, we examined therapeutic effectiveness within the setting of cancer-related distress with the objective of understanding its constituent parts.
Seventy-eight experienced psychosocial oncology clinicians from 24 health care centers across Canada were invited to participate in 3 focus groups each. In total, 29 focus groups were held over 2 years, during which clinicians articulated the therapeutic factors deemed most helpful in mitigating patient psychosocial distress. The content of each focus group was summarized into major themes and was reviewed with participants to confirm their accuracy. Upon completion of the focus groups, workshops were held in various centers, eliciting participant feedback on an empirical model of therapeutic effectiveness based on the qualitative analysis of focus group data.
Three primary, interrelated therapeutic domains emerged from the data, forming a model of optimal therapeutic effectiveness: 1) personal growth and self-care (domain A), 2) therapeutic approaches (domain B), and 3) creation of a safe space (domain C). Areas of domain overlap were identified and labeled accordingly: domain AB, therapeutic humility; domain BC, therapeutic pacing; and domain AC, therapeutic presence.
This empirical model provides detailed insights regarding the elements and pedagogy of effective communication and psychosocial care for patients who are experiencing cancer-related distress.
Notes
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 1999 Oct;35(11):1592-710673967
Cites: J Palliat Med. 2012 Sep;15(9):998-100522946576
Cites: Aust Fam Physician. 2000 Nov;29(11):1022-511127057
Cites: Psychooncology. 2001 Jan-Feb;10(1):19-2811180574
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2002 Feb;54(3):433-4311824919
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2001 Aug;2(8):499-50511905726
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2003 Feb;23(1):1-3312559992
Cites: Palliat Med. 2003 Sep;17(6):527-3714526887
Cites: Palliat Med. 2003 Dec;17(8):688-9414694920
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2004 Jun 14;90(12):2297-30415162149
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 1998 Aug;28(2):345-529725732
Cites: Psychooncology. 2004 Oct;13(10):700-815386643
Cites: Med Educ. 2005 Jul;39(7):742-5015960795
Cites: Nurs Outlook. 2005 May-Jun;53(3):134-4015988450
Cites: Psychooncology. 2005 Oct;14(10):831-45; discussion 846-716200519
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2007 Mar 26;96(6):868-7417311020
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2007 May 1;25(13):1691-717470861
Cites: Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2007 Jun;11(3):413-817623625
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2008 Aug;18(8):1049-6118650561
Cites: Psychother Res. 2008 Sep;18(5):508-2218816002
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2008 Dec;36(6):559-7118579340
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2009 Feb;29(1):47-5618952334
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2009 Nov;17(11):1417-2319283411
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2010 Feb;18(2):255-6319609571
Cites: J Support Oncol. 2010 Jan-Feb;8(1):4-1220235417
Cites: Psychother Res. 2010 Nov;20(6):627-4620737352
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2011 Mar;82(3):389-9521257280
Cites: Psychooncology. 2011 Jun;20(6):594-60021305646
Cites: Psychooncology. 2011 Jun;20(6):601-821308857
Cites: Psychotherapy (Chic). 2010 Mar;47(1):20-722401997
Comment In: Cancer. 2013 May 1;119(9):1609-1023341022
PubMed ID
23341092 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Patient Dignity Inventory: applications in the oncology setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121035
Source
J Palliat Med. 2012 Sep;15(9):998-1005
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Harvey Max Chochinov
Susan E McClement
Thomas F Hack
Nancy A McKeen
Amanda M Rach
Pierre Gagnon
Shane Sinclair
Jill Taylor-Brown
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Manitoba Palliative Care Research Unit, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. harvey.chochinov@cancercare.mb.ca
Source
J Palliat Med. 2012 Sep;15(9):998-1005
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Medical Oncology - manpower - methods
Neoplasms - psychology
Palliative Care - psychology
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Right to Die
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - psychology
Terminally Ill - psychology
Abstract
The Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI) is a novel 25-item psychometric instrument, designed to identify multiple sources of distress (physical, functional, psychosocial, existential, and spiritual) commonly seen in patients who are terminally ill. It was also designed to help guide psychosocial clinicians in their work with patients. While its validity and reliability have been studied within the context of palliative care, its utility in clinical settings has not as yet been examined.
The purpose of this study was to determine how psychosocial oncology professionals would use the PDI with within their practice and what utility it might have across the broad spectrum of cancer.
Between October 2008 and January 2009, psychosocial oncology clinicians from across Canada were invited to use the PDI to determine their impressions of this approach in identifying distress and informing their practice.
Ninety participants used the PDI and submitted a total of 429 feedback questionnaires detailing their experience with individual patients. In 76% of instances, the PDI revealed one or more previously unreported concerns; in 81% of instances, clinicians reported that the PDI facilitated their work. While it was used in a wide range of circumstances, clinicians were more inclined to apply the PDI to patients engaged in active treatment or palliation, rather than those in remission, having recently relapsed, or newly diagnosed. Besides its utility in identifying distress, the PDI enabled clinicians to provide more targeted therapeutic responses to areas of patient concern.
While this study suggests various clinical applications of the PDI, it also provides an ideal forerunner for research that will directly engage patients living with cancer.
PubMed ID
22946576 View in PubMed
Less detail