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Effect of community population size on breast cancer screening, stage distribution, treatment use and outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126944
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jan-Feb;103(1):46-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
Robert A Olson
Alan Nichol
Nadine R Caron
Ivo A Olivotto
Caroline Speers
Stephen Chia
Ashley Davidson
Andy Coldman
Chris Bajdik
Scott Tyldesley
Author Affiliation
BC Cancer Agency, Centre for the North, Prince George, BC. rolson2@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jan-Feb;103(1):46-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - pathology - therapy
British Columbia - epidemiology
Combined Modality Therapy - utilization
Drug Utilization
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Mass Screening - utilization
Mastectomy - methods - utilization
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant - utilization
Rural Health Services - utilization
Survival Rate
Abstract
Residents of rural communities have decreased access to cancer screening and treatments compared to urban residents, though use of resources and patient outcomes have not been assessed with a comprehensive population-based analysis. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether breast cancer screening and treatments were utilized less frequently in rural BC and whether this translated into differences in outcomes.
All patients diagnosed with breast cancer in British Columbia (BC) during 2002 were identified from the Cancer Registry and linked to the Screening Mammography database. Patient demographics, pathology, stage, treatments, mammography use and death data were abstracted. Patients were categorized as residing in large, small and rural local health authorities (LHAs) using Canadian census information. Use of resources and outcomes were compared across these LHA size categories. We hypothesized that mastectomy rates (instead of breast-conserving surgery) would be higher in rural areas, since breast conservation is standardly accompanied by adjuvant radiotherapy, which has limited availability in rural BC. In contrast we hypothesized that cancer screening and systemic therapy use would be similar, as they are more widely dispersed across BC. Exploratory analyses were performed to assess whether disparities in screening and treatment utilization translated into differences in survival.
2,869 breast cancer patients were included in our study. Patients from rural communities presented with more advanced disease (p=0.01). On multivariable analysis, patients from rural, compared to urban, LHAs were less likely to be screening mammography attendees (OR=0.62; p
PubMed ID
22338328 View in PubMed
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Getting to the root of trauma in Canada's Aboriginal population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175312
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1023-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2005
Author
Nadine R Caron
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Northern Medical Program, Prince George, BC. caronn@unbc.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1023-4
Date
Apr-12-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Canada
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Wounds and Injuries - ethnology - prevention & control
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Apr 16;166(8):1029-3512002979
Cites: Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 2000 Dec;21(4):339-4211111793
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2001 Jun;16(2):169-7711356755
Cites: Public Health. 2001 Jan;115(1):44-5011402351
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1007-1115824405
Cites: Inj Control Saf Promot. 2002 Sep;9(3):199-20512462174
Cites: BMJ. 2003 Aug 23;327(7412):419-2212933728
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Dec 1;155(11):1569-788956834
Cites: Lancet. 1997 May 3;349(9061):1269-769142060
Comment On: CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1007-1115824405
PubMed ID
15824407 View in PubMed
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Partnering With Northern British Columbia First Nations in the Spectrum of Biobanking and Genomic Research: Moving Beyond the Disparities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307006
Source
JCO Glob Oncol. 2020 02; 6:120-123
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2020
Author
Nadine R Caron
Brooke T Boswell
Viktor Deineko
Megan A Hunt
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia.
Source
JCO Glob Oncol. 2020 02; 6:120-123
Date
02-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PubMed ID
32031443 View in PubMed
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Patterns of outdoor recreational injury in northern British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106999
Source
Wilderness Environ Med. 2013 Dec;24(4):397-401
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Floyd A Besserer
Nadine R Caron
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Saskatchewan College of Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Electronic address: fbesserer@gmail.com.
Source
Wilderness Environ Med. 2013 Dec;24(4):397-401
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Recreation
Retrospective Studies
Sports
Trauma Centers
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine the patterns of severe injury documented at a northern British Columbia regional trauma center based on age, sex, month of year, activity type, injury type, and injury severity as they relate to participation in outdoor recreational activities.
A retrospective analysis of data abstracted from the British Columbia Trauma Registry for patients sustaining injuries between April 1, 2004, and March 31, 2007, while engaged in outdoor recreational activities in the Northern Health Authority. The British Columbia Trauma Registry inclusion criteria are as follows: 1) admitted for treatment of injuries sustained from the transfer of external energy or force; 2) admitted to the facility within 7 days of injury; and 3) length of stay more than 2 days or in-hospital mortality.
In all, 159 patients met study criteria. August and September were peak injury months (mean 7.3 and 7.0 per month, respectively). The highest injury patterns involved cycling (n = 31), all-terrain vehicle operation (n = 30), horseback riding (n = 22), and snowmobiling (n = 22). Of the 159 patients, 76.1% were male, with a peak age distribution between 10 years and 19 years (22%). Males were more commonly injured than females among cycling (83.9%), all-terrain vehicle (86.7%), and snowmobile (100%) traumas. Females were more commonly injured from horseback riding events (42.1%).
This study emphasizes the need for rapid translation of research findings into injury prevention awareness and programming in northern British Columbia, particularly relating to cycling, horseback riding, snowmobiling, and all-terrain vehicle operation. Further investigation is required to analyze long-term outcomes for this common injury population.
PubMed ID
24075058 View in PubMed
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