Skip header and navigation

Refine By

13 records – page 1 of 2.

Source
Neurol India. 2002 Sep;50(3):364-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
S. Jha
A K Dhanuka
M N Singh
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Raebareli Road, Lucknow - 226 014, India. sjha@sgpgi.ac.in
Source
Neurol India. 2002 Sep;50(3):364-5
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Arsenic Poisoning - diagnosis
Chronic Disease
Family Health
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
A family of six members is reported, who accidently consumed arsenic, during preparation of indigenous medicine in their home, and developed arsenic poisoning.
PubMed ID
12391471 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between class III obesity (BMI of 40-59 kg/m2) and mortality: a pooled analysis of 20 prospective studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267096
Source
PLoS Med. 2014 Jul;11(7):e1001673
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Cari M Kitahara
Alan J Flint
Amy Berrington de Gonzalez
Leslie Bernstein
Michelle Brotzman
Robert J MacInnis
Steven C Moore
Kim Robien
Philip S Rosenberg
Pramil N Singh
Elisabete Weiderpass
Hans Olov Adami
Hoda Anton-Culver
Rachel Ballard-Barbash
Julie E Buring
D Michal Freedman
Gary E Fraser
Laura E Beane Freeman
Susan M Gapstur
John Michael Gaziano
Graham G Giles
Niclas Håkansson
Jane A Hoppin
Frank B Hu
Karen Koenig
Martha S Linet
Yikyung Park
Alpa V Patel
Mark P Purdue
Catherine Schairer
Howard D Sesso
Kala Visvanathan
Emily White
Alicja Wolk
Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
Patricia Hartge
Source
PLoS Med. 2014 Jul;11(7):e1001673
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia - epidemiology
Body mass index
Humans
Life expectancy
Obesity - mortality
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The prevalence of class III obesity (body mass index [BMI]=40 kg/m2) has increased dramatically in several countries and currently affects 6% of adults in the US, with uncertain impact on the risks of illness and death. Using data from a large pooled study, we evaluated the risk of death, overall and due to a wide range of causes, and years of life expectancy lost associated with class III obesity.
In a pooled analysis of 20 prospective studies from the United States, Sweden, and Australia, we estimated sex- and age-adjusted total and cause-specific mortality rates (deaths per 100,000 persons per year) and multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for adults, aged 19-83 y at baseline, classified as obese class III (BMI 40.0-59.9 kg/m2) compared with those classified as normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2). Participants reporting ever smoking cigarettes or a history of chronic disease (heart disease, cancer, stroke, or emphysema) on baseline questionnaires were excluded. Among 9,564 class III obesity participants, mortality rates were 856.0 in men and 663.0 in women during the study period (1976-2009). Among 304,011 normal-weight participants, rates were 346.7 and 280.5 in men and women, respectively. Deaths from heart disease contributed largely to the excess rates in the class III obesity group (rate differences?=?238.9 and 132.8 in men and women, respectively), followed by deaths from cancer (rate differences?=?36.7 and 62.3 in men and women, respectively) and diabetes (rate differences?=?51.2 and 29.2 in men and women, respectively). Within the class III obesity range, multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for total deaths and deaths due to heart disease, cancer, diabetes, nephritis/nephrotic syndrome/nephrosis, chronic lower respiratory disease, and influenza/pneumonia increased with increasing BMI. Compared with normal-weight BMI, a BMI of 40-44.9, 45-49.9, 50-54.9, and 55-59.9 kg/m2 was associated with an estimated 6.5 (95% CI: 5.7-7.3), 8.9 (95% CI: 7.4-10.4), 9.8 (95% CI: 7.4-12.2), and 13.7 (95% CI: 10.5-16.9) y of life lost. A limitation was that BMI was mainly ascertained by self-report.
Class III obesity is associated with substantially elevated rates of total mortality, with most of the excess deaths due to heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, and major reductions in life expectancy compared with normal weight. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.
Notes
Cites: Healthy People 2000 Stat Notes. 1995 Mar;(6):1-1011762384
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Mar 28;373(9669):1083-9619299006
Cites: Cancer. 2002 May 1;94(9):2490-50112015775
Cites: Obes Rev. 2001 Aug;2(3):141-712120099
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2002 Aug;5(4):561-512186665
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Sep;13(7):625-3512296510
Cites: Natl Vital Stat Rep. 2002 Sep 16;50(15):1-11912382630
Cites: IARC Sci Publ. 2002;156:69-7012484128
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Jan 1;159(1):83-9314693663
Cites: Obes Surg. 2004 May;14(5):589-60015186624
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004 Jul;13(7):1121-715247122
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1982;35(6):437-437042727
Cites: Cancer. 1989 Aug 1;64(3):570-812743251
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Jan 27;269(4):483-78419667
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 1994 Nov;5(6):491-5007827235
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1995 Feb 1;87(3):190-77707406
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1996 Apr;104(4):362-98732939
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1997 Nov;6(11):907-169367064
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Dec 23;351(26):2694-70315616204
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Mar;29(3):334-915685247
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 May;30(5):822-916404410
Cites: Psychol Methods. 2006 Jun;11(2):193-20616784338
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Jul 5;296(1):79-8616820550
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Sep 20;296(11):1371-616985229
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jan;15(1):188-9617228047
Cites: Curr Diabetes Rev. 2006 Nov;2(4):367-7318220642
Cites: Health Rep. 2008 Jun;19(2):77-8418642521
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Nov 13;359(20):2105-2019005195
Cites: J Intern Med. 2008 Nov;264(5):442-5118513340
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2010 Jan 25;170(2):146-5420101009
Cites: South Med J. 2010 Apr;103(4):323-3020224489
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2010 Nov;163(5):735-4520798226
Cites: JAMA. 2010 Oct 27;304(16):1795-80220935337
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Dec 2;363(23):2211-921121834
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Dec 15;172(12):1442-5420952596
Cites: Circulation. 2011 Apr 19;123(15):1683-70121403092
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2011 Oct;34(10):2152-721836103
Cites: Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 2011 Dec;32(4):372-721490499
Cites: JAMA. 2012 Feb 1;307(5):491-722253363
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(7):e3947122848355
Cites: Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther. 2012 Jul;10(7):933-922908926
Cites: Med Clin North Am. 2013 Jan;97(1):59-7423290730
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2013;10:E7723680506
Cites: Acta Diabetol. 2013 Jun;50(3):443-923447004
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2013 Jun;37(6):889-9122986681
Cites: Mayo Clin Proc. 2014 Mar;89(3):335-4524582192
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2013;13:29023547911
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2000 Feb;10(2):125-3410691066
Cites: J Womens Health Gend Based Med. 2000 Jan-Feb;9(1):19-2710718501
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Aug 1;152(3):264-7110933273
Cites: Control Clin Trials. 2000 Dec;21(6 Suppl):349S-355S11189687
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Sep 26;286(12):1494-711572743
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Dec 15;154(12):1119-2511744517
PubMed ID
25003901 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bacterial communities in ancient permafrost profiles of Svalbard, Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286055
Source
J Basic Microbiol. 2017 Sep 21;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-21-2017
Author
Purnima Singh
Shiv M Singh
Ram N Singh
Simantini Naik
Utpal Roy
Alok Srivastava
Manfred Bölter
Source
J Basic Microbiol. 2017 Sep 21;
Date
Sep-21-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Permafrost soils are unique habitats in polar environment and are of great ecological relevance. The present study focuses on the characterization of bacterial communities from permafrost profiles of Svalbard, Arctic. Counts of culturable bacteria range from 1.50?×?10(3) to 2.22?×?10(5) CFU?g(-1) , total bacterial numbers range from 1.14?×?10(5) to 5.52?×?10(5) cells?g(-1) soil. Bacterial isolates are identified through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas are the most dominant genera, and A. sulfonivorans, A. bergeri, P. mandelii, and P. jessenii as the dominant species. Other species belong to genera Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Enterobacter, Nesterenkonia, Psychrobacter, Rhizobium, Rhodococcus, Sphingobacterium, Sphingopyxis, Stenotrophomonas, and Virgibacillus. To the best of our knowledge, genera Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, Nesterenkonia, Psychrobacter, Rhizobium, Sphingobacterium, Sphingopyxis, Stenotrophomonas, and Virgibacillus are the first northernmost records from Arctic permafrost. The present study fills the knowledge gap of culturable bacterial communities and their chronological characterization from permafrost soils of Ny-Ålesund (79°N), Arctic.
PubMed ID
28940222 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bacterial communities in ancient permafrost profiles of Svalbard, Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289236
Source
J Basic Microbiol. 2017 Dec; 57(12):1018-1036
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Purnima Singh
Shiv M Singh
Ram N Singh
Simantini Naik
Utpal Roy
Alok Srivastava
Manfred Bölter
Author Affiliation
Birla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS), Pilani-K.K. Birla Goa Campus, Zuarinagar, Goa, India.
Source
J Basic Microbiol. 2017 Dec; 57(12):1018-1036
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - classification - genetics
Bacterial Load
Biota
Cluster analysis
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
Permafrost - microbiology
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Svalbard
Abstract
Permafrost soils are unique habitats in polar environment and are of great ecological relevance. The present study focuses on the characterization of bacterial communities from permafrost profiles of Svalbard, Arctic. Counts of culturable bacteria range from 1.50?×?103 to 2.22?×?105 CFU?g-1 , total bacterial numbers range from 1.14?×?105 to 5.52?×?105 cells?g-1 soil. Bacterial isolates are identified through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas are the most dominant genera, and A. sulfonivorans, A. bergeri, P. mandelii, and P. jessenii as the dominant species. Other species belong to genera Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Enterobacter, Nesterenkonia, Psychrobacter, Rhizobium, Rhodococcus, Sphingobacterium, Sphingopyxis, Stenotrophomonas, and Virgibacillus. To the best of our knowledge, genera Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, Nesterenkonia, Psychrobacter, Rhizobium, Sphingobacterium, Sphingopyxis, Stenotrophomonas, and Virgibacillus are the first northernmost records from Arctic permafrost. The present study fills the knowledge gap of culturable bacterial communities and their chronological characterization from permafrost soils of Ny-Ålesund (79°N), Arctic.
PubMed ID
28940222 View in PubMed
Less detail

Elective tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated children in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157682
Source
Intensive Care Med. 2008 Aug;34(8):1498-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Tania Principi
Gavin C Morrison
Doreen M Matsui
Kathy N Speechley
Jamie A Seabrook
Ram N Singh
Alik Kornecki
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre, ON N6A5W9, London, ON, Canada.
Source
Intensive Care Med. 2008 Aug;34(8):1498-502
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Injuries - therapy
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Guillain-Barre Syndrome - therapy
Humans
Intensive Care Units, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Respiration, Artificial
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult - therapy
Time Factors
Tracheostomy - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Abstract
To determine the current practice and opinions of paediatric intensivists in Canada regarding tracheostomy in children with potentially reversible conditions which are anticipated to require prolonged mechanical ventilation.
Self-administered survey among paediatric intensivists within paediatrics critical care units (PCCU) across Canada.
All 16 PCCUs participated in the survey with a response rate of 81% (63 physicians). In 14 of 16 centres one to five tracheostomies were performed during 2006. Two centres did not perform any tracheostomies. The overall rate of tracheostomy is less than 1.5%. Percutaneous technique is used in 3/16 (19%) of centres. Readiness to undertake tracheostomy during the first 21[Symbol: see text]days of illness is influenced by patient diagnosis; severe traumatic brain injury 66% vs. 42% in a 2-year-old with Guillain-Barré syndrome, 48% in a 9-year-old with Guillain-Barré syndrome, and 12% in a child with isolated ARDS. In a child with ARDS 25% of respondents would never consider tracheostomy. Age does not affect timing nor keenness for tracheostomy. The majority, 81%, believe that the risks associated with the procedure do not outweigh the potential benefits. Finally, 51% believe that tracheostomy is underutilized in children.
Elective tracheostomy is rarely performed among ventilated children in Canada. However, 51% of physicians believe it is underutilized. The role of elective tracheostomy and the percutaneous technique in children requires further investigation.
PubMed ID
18418569 View in PubMed
Less detail

Elevated platelet-derived microparticle levels during unstable angina.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213792
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1995 Dec;11(11):1015-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
N. Singh
C H Gemmell
P A Daly
E L Yeo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Centenary Health Centre, Scarborough, Ontario.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1995 Dec;11(11):1015-21
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Angina, Unstable - blood - diagnosis - immunology
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Canada
Coronary Care Units
Female
Flow Cytometry
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Platelet Activation
Abstract
To use fluorescent-activated flow cytometry coupled with activation-dependent and -independent platelet-specific monoclonal antibodies in a pilot study to assess the degree and time course of platelet activation events in patients presenting within 24 h of onset of Canadian Cardiovascular Society class 4 angina.
Although activated platelets play a key role in the pathogenesis of unstable angina, the development of simple assays to quantify platelet activation events directly is lacking.
Blood samples were drawn from six unstable angina patients from the coronary care every 4 h over a 24 h period into a fixative and analyzed the following day. All patients were on acetylsalicylic acid and heparin. Comparisons were made with six healthy, medication-free volunteers. Platelets were defined by flow cytometry as positive for fluorochrome-labelled monoclonal antibody to glycoprotein Ib (AP1) and within the single intact platelet window defined by scatter characteristics. The presence of the fluorochrome-labelled activation-specific monoclonal antibody (KC4.1 for anti-P-selectin, PAC-1 for activated glycoprotein IIb/IIIa) was used to determine the percentage of activated platelets. Platelet activation-dependent microparticles were identified by gating on AP1-positive events and defining microparticles (percentage of total platelet events) as being smaller (forward size scatter) than single intact platelets.
There was a marked, sixfold increase in microparticle generation (17 +/- 7% versus 2.8 +/- 1.4%) in the unstable angina patients (P = 0.001) compared with healthy volunteers. Further assessment of six coronary care unit patients with nonischemic cardiac disorders demonstrated a highly variable intermediate level of microparticle generation (11 +/- 7%). No differences in activated glycoprotein IIb/IIIa expression were noted for the various groups and P-selectin expression was lower in the unstable angina patients (6 +/- 2% versus 12 +/- 3%, (P = 0.007).
This pilot study suggests that measuring circulating platelet microparticle levels is a simple yet useful parameter for the assessment of platelet activation in unstable angina compared with activation markers on intact whole platelets. Despite antiplatelet and antithrombin therapy, significant platelet activation occurred in these patients over the initial 24 h. Flow cytometry may be a useful tool in assessing the efficacy of newer therapeutic modalities.
PubMed ID
8542543 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fostering self-change among problem drinkers: a proactive community intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210779
Source
Addict Behav. 1996 Nov-Dec;21(6):817-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
L C Sobell
J A Cunningham
M B Sobell
S. Agrawal
D R Gavin
G I Leo
K N Singh
Author Affiliation
Nova Southeastern University, Center for Psychological Studies, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33314, USA.
Source
Addict Behav. 1996 Nov-Dec;21(6):817-33
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Feedback
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Ontario
Patient Education as Topic
Self Care - psychology
Social Environment
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This paper describes the rationale and design for a recently implemented study involving a community-based intervention designed to foster self-change for individuals who otherwise would be unlikely to seek formal help or treatment for their alcohol problem. The study is based on research examining natural recovery processes with alcohol abusers and on clinical trials using a Guided Self-Change model of treatment with problem drinkers. Advertisements and mailed pamphlets are used to solicit individuals who wanted to change their drinking on their own using self-help materials. Respondents are screened and, if eligible, are randomly assigned to two conditions: Guided Self-Change (GSC) or Educational Materials Control (EMC) (projected N = 788): All subjects complete and mail in several brief assessment forms. Subjects in the GSC group receive advice and personalized feedback based on their assessment answers. Subjects in the EMC group receive educational pamphlets prepared for general medical and mental health settings. Subject characteristics and drinking-related history variables for the first 10% of the sample are presented. Subjects will be followed up at 12 months following the intervention.
PubMed ID
8904946 View in PubMed
Less detail

Is a full team required for emergency management of pediatric trauma?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223339
Source
J Trauma. 1992 Aug;33(2):213-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1992
Author
R. Singh
N. Kissoon
N. Singh
M. Girotti
P. Lane
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Emergency, Children's Hospital of Western Ontario, London.
Source
J Trauma. 1992 Aug;33(2):213-8
Date
Aug-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric - organization & administration
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Injury Severity Score
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Patient care team
Retrospective Studies
Trauma Centers - organization & administration
Wounds and Injuries - mortality - therapy
Abstract
Pediatric trauma centers often do not meet the guidelines requiring a trauma team as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). We reviewed our experience with a team consisting of a pediatric emergency physician, resident, nurse, and respiratory therapist. The surgical and pediatric critical care residents and staff were available within 5 minutes. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 146 patients (aged 8.1 +/- 4.8 years) between 1987 and 1989, with Injury Severity Scores (ISS) greater than or equal to 16 or admitted to the pediatric critical care unit. The time of presentation, surgical services consulted, and the nature of the injury were obtained from chart review. The Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS), the Revised Trauma Score (RTS), the Injury Severity Score (ISS), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, and Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM) were used to determine the severity of insult and physiologic derangement on admission. The Modified Injury Severity Score (MISS) was determined and the Delta score for Disability Assessment was assigned at discharge. The Delta score was also determined at 3-month intervals up to one year. The probability of survival (Ps) was calculated, using the ISS and RTS. The Z statistic for this group of patients was then determined, using the Major Trauma Outcome Study (MTOS) methodology. The percentages of patients who were normal, disabled, and dead were 61%, 31.5%, and 7.5%, respectively, at 6 months follow-up. Eleven deaths were expected based on PRISM and TRISS analysis. Our mortality and morbidity figures were comparable with those of centers with teams based on AAP guidelines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1507283 View in PubMed
Less detail

Obesity and life expectancy among long-lived Black adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113823
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2014 Jan;69(1):63-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Pramil N Singh
Ralph W Clark
Patti Herring
Joan Sabaté
David Shavlik
Gary E Fraser
Author Affiliation
DrPH, Center for Health Research, Nichol Hall Room 1710, School of Public Health, Loma Linda, CA 92350. psingh@llu.edu.
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2014 Jan;69(1):63-72
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Americans
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Obesity - ethnology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate - trends
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
In samples of African Americans and the elderly adults, obesity is often not found to be a risk factor for mortality. These data contradict the evidence linking obesity to chronic disease in these groups. Our objective was to determine whether obesity remains a risk factor for mortality among long-lived black adults.
The Adventist Health Study 2 is a large prospective cohort study of Seventh-day Adventist church members who are encouraged by faith-based principles to avoid tobacco, alcohol, and meat consumption. We conducted an attained age survival analysis of 22,884 U.S. blacks of the cohort-half of whom attained an age of 58-108 years during the follow-up (adult life expectancy of 84 years in men, 89 years in women).
Women in the highest body mass index quintile (>33.8) experienced a significant 61% increase (hazard ratio [95% CI] = 1.62 [1.23, 2.11] relative to the middle quintile) in mortality risk and a 6.2-year (95% CI = 2.8-10.2 years) decrease in life expectancy. Men in the highest body mass index quintile (>30.8) experienced a significant 87% increase (hazard ratio [95% CI] = 1.87 [1.28, 2.73] relative to the middle quintile) in mortality risk and 5.9-year (95% CI = 2.1- 9.5 years) decrease in life expectancy. Obesity (>30) was a significant risk factor relative to normal weight (18.5-24.9) in never-smokers. Instantaneous hazards indicated excess risk from obesity was evident through at least age 85 years. The nonobese tended to follow plant-based diets and exercise vigorously.
Avoiding obesity promotes gains in life expectancy through at least the eighth decade of life in black adults. Evidence for weight control through plant-based diets and active living was found in long-lived nonobese blacks.
PubMed ID
23682156 View in PubMed
Less detail

13 records – page 1 of 2.