Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

8 records – page 1 of 1.

A 60-year follow-up of the incidence and prevalence of multiple sclerosis in Hordaland County, Western Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272084
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2016 Jan;87(1):100-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
N. Grytten
J H Aarseth
H M B Lunde
K M Myhr
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2016 Jan;87(1):100-5
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Aged
Child
Delayed Diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Progressive - epidemiology
Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Sunlight
Vitamin D - metabolism
Young Adult
Abstract
Investigate the incidence of multiple sclerosis during 1953-2013 and estimate the prevalence rate of MS on 1 January 2003 and 2013 in Hordaland County, Western Norway.
All patients with onset of disease in Hordaland 1953-2013 were identified in files from previous studies until 2003 and from patient records at the departments of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital and Haugesund Hospital during 2003-2013. 1558 patients were assessed and 1402 of these were included, of whom 1035 were alive and living in Hordaland at prevalence day 1 January 2013. Annual incidence rates were calculated for 1953-2013.
On 1 January 2003, the crude prevalence rate was 191/100 000 population and on 1 January 2013, the crude prevalence rate was 211.4 (95% CI 198.3 to 224.2) per 100 000; 270.9 (95% CI 250.6 to 292.3) for women and 151.8 (95% CI 136.8 to 167.9) for men. Prevalence peaked at ages 55-59 years for women and 60-64 years for men. The annual incidence rate increased from 1.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 2.6) per 100 000 during 1953-1957 to 7.2 (95% CI 6.0 to 8.5) during 1978-1982 and to 8.5 (95% CI 7.3 to 9.7) during 2003-2007, thus indicating a stabilising incidence over the past 35 years. The female/male ratio ranged from 1.2:1 to 1.8:1 (p=0.381) during the period.
Stabilising rather than increasing incidence combined with the stable female/male ratio are indicative of non-fluctuating environmental factors in a geographical area otherwise characterised by lack of vitamin D effective sun exposure. The rising prevalence of MS could result from improved survival and follow-up methodology.
Notes
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2012 Jul;83(7):719-2422577232
Cites: Nature. 2013 Apr 25;496(7446):518-2223467095
Cites: Mult Scler. 2014 Nov;20(13):1780-224603884
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2014 Jan;85(1):76-8424052635
Cites: Neurology. 2003 Nov 25;61(10):1373-714638958
Cites: Ann Neurol. 1983 Mar;13(3):227-316847134
Cites: Neurology. 1984 Sep;34(9):1202-76540405
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 1984 Aug;70(2):96-1036333133
Cites: Neurology. 1985 Apr;35(4):545-513982640
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 1985 May;71(5):390-54013662
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 1990 Sep;82(3):161-82270743
Cites: Neuroepidemiology. 1991;10(2):53-612062418
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1960;35(147):88-9213737885
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Feb 17;125(4):431-315742014
Cites: Ann Neurol. 2005 Dec;58(6):840-616283615
Cites: Neurology. 2006 Jan 24;66(2):182-616434650
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Dec 20;296(23):2832-817179460
Cites: Ann Neurol. 2007 Apr;61(4):288-9917444504
Cites: Ann Neurol. 2007 Jun;61(6):504-1317492755
Cites: Mult Scler. 2007 Sep;13(8):962-717623734
Cites: J Neurol. 2008 Jan;255(1):49-5518080855
Cites: Mult Scler. 2008 Aug;14(7):880-618573832
Cites: Mult Scler. 2008 Aug;14(7):872-918573834
Cites: Mult Scler. 2008 Nov;14(9):1191-818632781
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2009 Apr;80(4):386-9118931003
Cites: Neurology. 2010 Feb 9;74(6):465-7120071664
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2010 May;9(5):520-3220398859
Cites: Mult Scler. 2010 May;16(5):520-520215479
Cites: Neurology. 2011 Feb 1;76(5):425-3121282589
Cites: Mult Scler. 2011 Feb;17(2):241-420978036
Cites: Ann Neurol. 2011 Feb;69(2):292-30221387374
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 2011 Jun;123(6):396-921492097
Cites: Mult Scler. 2011 Aug;17(8):901-821459810
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 2011 Oct;124(4):250-721143594
Cites: Neurology. 2012 Apr 24;78(17):1315-2222496198
PubMed ID
25714916 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health-related quality of life and disease-modifying treatment behaviour in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis--a multicentre cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117611
Source
Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 2012;(195):51-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
N. Grytten
J H Aarseth
K. Espeset
G. Berg Johnsen
R. Wehus
C. Lund
T. Riise
R. Haugstad
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis Competence Centre, Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. nina.grytten@helse-bergen.no
Source
Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 2012;(195):51-7
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting - epidemiology - therapy
Norway - epidemiology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To assess the overall health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a population-based cohort of patients recently diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) compared with the general Norwegian population, to compare HRQoL among MS patients continuing, switching, stopping or not starting disease-modifying treatment (DMT) and to assess the motivation for DMT according to HRQoL.
A multicentre retrospective survey completed by patients recently diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS (relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, RRMS) during 2001-2007 at four university clinics in Norway was performed. HRQoL was measured by the SF-36 version 2 Health Survey and standardized according to the general population with a mean of 50 and a standard deviation of 10. Motivation for DMT was assessed using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS).
The mean age at diagnosis was 37 years. Patients had reduced mean scores for all eight dimensions of the SF-36 with lowest scores on social functioning (mean = 31.1), mental health (mean = 32.7), general health (mean = 39.7) and vitality (mean = 40.9) compared with the general population. Continuers scored higher on mental summary scale (mean = 37.9) and lower on physical summary scale (mean = 43.8) compared with non-starters. Non-starters scored highest on physical summary scale (mean = 45.2, P = 0.007) and lowest on mental summary scale (36.1, P = 0.01) compared with continuers, stoppers and switchers. Patients with high SF-36 physical health summary score and low SF-36 mental health summary score were less motivated for using DMT.
The association of HRQoL and motivation to DMT emphasizes the need for health care personnel to inform and motivate patients to DMT, especially among patients with low mental health and otherwise high physical health and functioning.
PubMed ID
23278657 View in PubMed
Less detail

Immunomodulatory treatment of multiple sclerosis in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164230
Source
Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 2007;187:46-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Ø. Torkildsen
N. Grytten
K-M Myhr
Author Affiliation
The Multiple Sclerosis National Competence Center, Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Clinical Medicine, Section for Neurology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. oivind.torkildsen@gmail.com
Source
Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 2007;187:46-50
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Guideline Adherence
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Immunologic Factors - therapeutic use
Interferon-beta - therapeutic use
Mitoxantrone - therapeutic use
Multiple Sclerosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - immunology
Norway - epidemiology
Peptides - therapeutic use
Physician's Practice Patterns
Prevalence
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
National guidelines for immunomodulatory treatment in multiple sclerosis (MS) were established in Norway in 2001. However, the nation-wide treatment practice has not been evaluated since. We therefore obtained information of all patients who have received prescriptions for the approved immunomodulatory medications, interferon-beta (Betaferon, Avonex, Rebif) and glatiramer acetate (Copaxone) registered in the Norwegian Prescription Database (Reseptregisteret). We also made a survey of patients treated with mitoxantrone (Novantrone) as well as patients supplied with immunomodulatory drugs in treatment trials. To further calculate the treatment frequency, a nation-wide prevalence of MS in Norway was estimated, based on available prevalence studies.
The estimated frequency of MS was approximately 150/100,000 in southern Norway and 100/100,000 in northern Norway. The treatment frequencies varied from 15% to 47% between the different counties with a frequency of 28% for the whole country.
Substantial differences in treatment frequencies between counties were detected, reflecting major differences in clinical practice within the country. This calls for increased focus on clinical application of the established treatment guidelines.
PubMed ID
17419828 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis National Competence Centre and National Multiple Sclerosis registry -- a resource for clinical practice and research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169600
Source
Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 2006;183:37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
K-M Myhr
N. Grytten
J H Aarseth
H. Nyland
Author Affiliation
Multiple Sclerosis National Competence Centre, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. kjell-morten.myhr@helse-bergen.no
Source
Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 2006;183:37-40
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical research
Hospital Departments - organization & administration
Hospitals, University - organization & administration
Humans
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Abstract
The Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis National Competence Centre was established at the Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen in 1996. Promotion of research, supervision and education of doctors and other health care professionals in Norway are the main responsibilities of the Centre. The centre has established national networks for MS care and research and has provided supervision and education of doctors and other health care professionals in Norway. Guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of MS have been established. The National Multiple Sclerosis Registry was established in 1998 and includes by January 2006 50-60% of all MS patients in Norway. Through a national collaboration, the registry aims for inclusion of a biobank unit for collection of cerebrospinal fluid and serum, DNA, and tissue samples.
PubMed ID
16637927 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis Registry and Biobank.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117614
Source
Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 2012;(195):20-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
K-M Myhr
N. Grytten
J H Aarseth
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis Registry and Biobank, Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. kjmy@haukeland.no
Source
Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 2012;(195):20-3
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Specimen Banks
Data Collection
Humans
Informed consent
Mental Competency
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - therapy
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Abstract
OBJEVTIVES: Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system with unknown cause and without any curable treatment. Research aiming at defining the pathogenesis of the disease is therefore needed.
The Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis Registry and Biobank has been established for systematic collection of clinical and epidemiological data as well as biological samples. Data collection is based on informed consent from the individual patients and recordings by the treating neurologists.
All researchers have, by application, access to data and biological samples from the Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis Registry and Biobank.
By this combined effort from both patients and health care personnel, the Registry and Biobank aims to facilitate research for improved understanding of disease mechanisms and improved health care in multiple sclerosis.
PubMed ID
23278652 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis Registry and Biobank.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269048
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2015;132(199):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
K-M Myhr
N. Grytten
Ø. Torkildsen
S. Wergeland
L. Bø
J H Aarseth
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2015;132(199):24-8
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Specimen Banks - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Nucleic Acid - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Abstract
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system with unknown cause and various benefits from disease modifying therapies. Systematic recording of data into national MS registries is therefore needed to optimize treatment and define the pathogenesis of the disease. The Norwegian MS Registry and Biobank was established for systematic collection of clinical and epidemiological data, as well as biological samples. Data collection is based on informed consent from the individual patients and recordings by treating neurologists. All researchers have, by application, access to data and biological samples from the Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis Registry and Biobank. By this combined effort from both patients and healthcare personnel, the Registry and Biobank aims to facilitate research for improved understanding of disease mechanisms and improved health care in MS.
PubMed ID
26046555 View in PubMed
Less detail

Stoppers and non-starters of disease-modifying treatment in multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121276
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2013 Feb;127(2):133-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
N. Grytten
J H Aarseth
K. Espeset
G B Johnsen
R. Wehus
C. Lund
R C Haugstad
Author Affiliation
National Multiple Sclerosis Competence Centre, Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. nina.grytten.torkildsen@helse-bergen.no
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2013 Feb;127(2):133-40
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Interferon-beta - therapeutic use
Male
Medication Adherence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting - drug therapy - psychology
Norway
Peptides - therapeutic use
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
To explore the frequency of non-starters and stoppers of disease-modifying therapy (DMT) in a cohort of people recently diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to identify reasons for non-starting or stopping DMT measured by demographic variables, social support [The Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL)] and disease-related stress [The Impact of Event Scale (IES)].
A multicentre retrospective cohort study using postal surveys completed by people with MS was performed, comprising all patients diagnosed with MS during 2000-2007 at four university clinics in Norway.
Of the 424 respondents, 180 (42%) were still using the first prescribed DMT, 83 (20%) were using DMT after switching DMT at least once, 53 (12.5%) had ended DMT, and 108 (25.5%) had never started DMT. The risk of non-starting DMT was associated with increasing age at diagnosis, the region, disease-related stress and avoidant trauma coping. The risk factors for stopping therapy after the first prescribed DMT were adverse events and high education.
Disease-related stress, avoidant trauma coping, age at diagnosis and education should be considered when motivating people with MS to use DMT. Hence, the challenges to starting and continuing treatment will probably also remain a problem with orally administered DMT.
PubMed ID
22924678 View in PubMed
Less detail

Time trends in the incidence and prevalence of multiple sclerosis in Norway during eight decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269047
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2015;132(199):29-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
N. Grytten
Ø. Torkildsen
K-M Myhr
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2015;132(199):29-36
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Specimen Banks
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex ratio
Abstract
Norway has been subjected to numerous epidemiological investigations on the prevalence and incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS), dating back to 1935. The objective of this study was to review the studies on the prevalence and incidence of MS in Norway, provide an update on the prevalence of MS in Norway, and describe the time trends in the prevalence and incidence of MS in relation to risk factors, case ascertainment, and data. We performed a systematic search on PubMed and MEDLINE up to November 2014 using the search string 'multiple sclerosis prevalence in Norway' or 'multiple sclerosis incidence in Norway'. In addition, we scrutinized the reference lists of the publications identified for relevant citations. We retrieved data on the distribution of MS in Norway on December 31, 2013 from the Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis Registry and Biobank and the Norwegian Patient Registry. We identified 29 articles. From 1961 to 2014, the reported prevalence of MS increased from 20 to 203 per 100,000 inhabitants, and the incidence increased from 1.9 to 8.0 per 100,000. The nationwide crude prevalence in Norway, based on the Norwegian Patient Registry, was 208 per 100,000 on December 31, 2013. The reported prevalence of MS in Norway has increased 10-fold, with several possible causes. During eight decades, neurological health services have generally become more accessible to the population, and transforming diagnostic criteria has made the diagnosis of MS more precise and valid. There have also been changes in lifestyle behavior and known risk factors, such as vitamin D and smoking, that might have contributed to the increased incidence of MS. A possible role of increased survival in MS needs to be examined further.
Notes
Cites: Mult Scler. 2013 Jul;19(8):1022-723257617
Cites: Eur J Neurol. 2013 Dec;20(12):1546-5223834430
Cites: Mult Scler. 2014 May;20(6):726-3224158977
Cites: BMC Neurol. 2014;14:19625274070
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 2014 Nov;130(5):328-3724893674
Cites: Mult Scler. 2014 Nov;20(13):1780-224603884
Cites: Mult Scler. 2014 Nov;20(13):1675-725395546
Cites: Mult Scler. 2014 Dec;20(14):1833-4024842958
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 2015 Feb;131(2):69-7925208981
Cites: Mult Scler. 2015 Apr;21(4):388-9525182290
Cites: Mult Scler. 2015 May;21(6):695-70225344371
Cites: Neurology. 2003 Oct 28;61(8):1122-414581676
Cites: J Neurol. 2000 Feb;247(2):129-3310751116
Cites: Ann Neurol. 2001 Jul;50(1):121-711456302
Cites: Eur J Neurol. 2001 Sep;8(5):463-911554910
Cites: Ann Neurol. 1983 Mar;13(3):227-316847134
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1952 May 8;246(19):722-814929306
Cites: Ulster Med J. 1954 Mar;23(Suppl. 2):1-2713238437
Cites: Brain. 1961 Jun;84:186-20313773723
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Feb 17;125(4):431-315742014
Cites: Ann Neurol. 2005 Dec;58(6):840-616283615
Cites: Neurology. 2006 Jan 24;66(2):182-616434650
Cites: Tissue Antigens. 2007 Apr;69(4):299-30417389012
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 2007;187:46-5017419828
Cites: J Neurol. 2007 Apr;254(4):471-717377831
Cites: J Neurol. 2008 Jan;255(1):49-5518080855
Cites: Neuroepidemiology. 2008;30(3):140-618382112
Cites: Mult Scler. 2008 Nov;14(9):1191-818632781
Cites: Neurology. 2009 Nov 10;73(19):1543-5019901245
Cites: Neurology. 1984 Sep;34(9):1202-76540405
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 1985 May;71(5):390-54013662
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 1985 Sep;72(3):321-74061052
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1991 May 1;133(9):932-91851394
Cites: Neurology. 1991 Jun;41(6):887-922046935
Cites: Neuroepidemiology. 1991;10(2):53-612062418
Cites: Brain. 1996 Feb;119 ( Pt 1):203-118624682
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 1996 Feb-Mar;93(2-3):104-98741127
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 2004 Jun;109(6):378-8415147459
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 1965;16:1-624285524
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 1966;42:Suppl 19:12-85909413
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 1970;46(4):455-835504330
Cites: Eur Neurol. 1974;11(5):281-954853293
Cites: Neurology. 1976 Jun;26(6 PT 2):20-258393
Cites: Mult Scler. 2010 May;16(5):520-520215479
Cites: Ann Neurol. 2011 Feb;69(2):292-30221387374
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 2011 Jun;123(6):396-921492097
Cites: Mult Scler. 2011 Aug;17(8):901-821459810
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 2011 Oct;124(4):250-721143594
Cites: Mult Scler. 2012 Sep;18(9):1334-622328681
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 2012;(195):36-4223278655
Cites: J Neurol. 2013 Jun;260(6):1481-823292231
Comment In: Acta Neurol Scand. 2015 Nov;132(5):368-926369381
Comment In: Acta Neurol Scand. 2015 Nov;132(5):364-726423981
PubMed ID
26046556 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.