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Ontario Child Health Study. Implications for clinical services, research and training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230419
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Aug;34(6):492-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
N R Grant
D R Offord
H M Blum
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Western Ontario, London.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Aug;34(6):492-9
Date
Aug-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychiatry - education
Child
Child Psychiatry - education
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Ontario
Referral and Consultation - utilization
Research
Risk factors
Abstract
The Ontario Child Health Study (OCHS) described in the companion paper (1) confirms the fact that psychiatric disorders among children and adolescents are prevalent, that comorbidity and associated impairements are common and that only a minority of children are seen by any definite mental health or social service. The current assessment and treatment methods and the present service system leave the majority of children unserved. Children and their families suffer a good deal before they are adequately diagnosed and treated, and treatment service delivered on a one-by-one basis are expensive. The OCHS data, has, it follows, important implications for clinical work, for mental health service planning, for further research and for training in child and adolescent psychiatry. This paper does not address all the implications of the OCHS in these areas but does attempt to address those which follow from the summary of the OCHS data described in (1).
PubMed ID
2670177 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1992 May;37(4):228-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992

Service needs of families where one parent has an affective illness: implications for service, education, and policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192947
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2001;20(1):107-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
C. Byrne
B. Pape
A. Ivask
L. Kuczynski
G. Browne
S. Whittaker
N R Grant
Y. Ashford
Author Affiliation
McMaster University.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2001;20(1):107-21
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Family Health
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Mood Disorders
Professional-Family Relations
Social Support
Abstract
This study explored the service needs of families with a parent with an affective illness. Focus-group and individual interviews were conducted at selected locations across Canada with individuals who had an affective disorder, their partners, and their adult children. A total of 67 participants were recruited. Corresponding service providers were mailed a questionnaire which asked information regarding these families' needs, the service provider's role with these families, and what prevented or assisted them in addressing those needs. A total of 419 service providers participated in the study. There was congruence between family-identified needs and the needs identified by service providers. However, there remains a large disparity between the knowledge of needs and having these needs met. The results of this study identify the gaps in service provision and make recommendations for changes in the areas of service, education, and policy-making.
PubMed ID
11599130 View in PubMed
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