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23 records – page 1 of 3.

14-year incidence, progression, and visual morbidity of age-related maculopathy: the Copenhagen City Eye Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50573
Source
Ophthalmology. 2005 May;112(5):787-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Helena Buch
Niels V Nielsen
Troels Vinding
Gorm B Jensen
Jan U Prause
Morten la Cour
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, National University Hospital (Rigshospitalet), Copenhagen, Denmark. hbh@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ophthalmology. 2005 May;112(5):787-98
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Macular Degeneration - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retinal Drusen - epidemiology - physiopathology
Retinitis Pigmentosa - epidemiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Vision Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Visual acuity
Visually Impaired Persons - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe the 14-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM) lesions and the related visual loss. DESIGN: Population-based cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Nine hundred forty-six residents (age range, 60-80 years) of Copenhagen participated in the study from 1986 through 1988. Excluding participants who had died since baseline, 359 persons (97.3% of survivors) were reexamined from 2000 through 2002. METHODS: Participants underwent extensive ophthalmologic examinations. Age-related maculopathy lesions were determined by grading color fundus photographs from the examinations using a modified Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of drusen type and size, pigmentary abnormalities, pure geographic atrophy, exudative ARM, visual impairment, and blindness. RESULTS: The 14-year incidences of early and late ARM were 31.5% and 14.8%, respectively. Individuals 75 to 80 years of age at baseline had significantly (P or =125 microm; 34.2% vs. 12.8%, respectively), soft drusen (45.2% vs. 21.4%), pigmentary abnormalities (31.4% vs. 17.0%), pure geographic atrophy (17.4% vs. 1.0%), and exudative ARM (23.3% vs. 5.7%). Severe drusen type, large drusen, and retinal pigmentary abnormalities at baseline were important predictors of incident late ARM. The 14-year incidences of visual impairment (20/200) or legal blindness from late ARM were 6.0% and 3.4%, respectively. Late ARM caused 35.7% of all visual impairment and 66.7% of all blindness. CONCLUSIONS: There is a high incidence of ARM lesions in this elderly white population. Severe drusen type and size or a combination of drusen and pigmentary abnormalities significantly increases the risk of developing late ARM, the most frequent cause of legal blindness in this population.
PubMed ID
15878058 View in PubMed
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Age-related maculopathy: a risk indicator for poorer survival in women: the Copenhagen City Eye Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50591
Source
Ophthalmology. 2005 Feb;112(2):305-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Helena Buch
Troels Vinding
Morten la Cour
Gorm B Jensen
Jan U Prause
Niels V Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, National University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. hbh@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ophthalmology. 2005 Feb;112(2):305-12
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Macular Degeneration - etiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate
Visual acuity
Abstract
PURPOSE: To examine patient survival in age-related maculopathy in a 14-year follow-up study. DESIGN: Population-based 14-year cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Nine hundred forty-six residents, aged 60 to 80 years, living in the Osterbro district of Copenhagen, Denmark, participated in the first examination conducted from 1986 to 1988. These participants were followed until death or until May 1, 2002, whichever came first. METHODS: Participants underwent an extensive ophthalmologic examination at Rigshospitalet, the National University Hospital of Copenhagen. Standardized protocols for physical examination, blood samples, and data from the National Central Person Register, the National Death Register, and the National Patient Register were used. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mortality and age-related maculopathy. RESULTS: By May 1, 2002, 60.9% (577 of 946) of the participants of the baseline study cohort had died. The adjusted 14-year cumulative mortality hazard ratio for subjects with early and late age-related maculopathy at baseline was 1.26 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.51). We identified a strong correlation between mortality and age-related maculopathy among women (relative risk, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.23-2.07) but not among men. CONCLUSIONS: When adjusting for survival-related factors, age-related maculopathy is a significant risk indicator for poorer survival in women and may be a marker of underlying serious systemic factors or aging processes specific to women.
PubMed ID
15691568 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of fundus photography and fundus autofluorescence in the diagnosis of cuticular drusen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274479
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 2016 Mar;100(3):378-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Tracy B Høeg
Birgitte Moldow
Ronald Klein
Morten La Cour
Kristian Klemp
Ditte Erngaard
Christina Ellervik
Helena Buch
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 2016 Mar;100(3):378-82
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bruch Membrane - pathology
Denmark
Eye Diseases, Hereditary - classification - diagnosis
Female
Fundus Oculi
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Observer Variation
Optical Imaging
Photography
Retina - pathology
Retinal Drusen - classification - diagnosis
Rural Population
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine non-mydriatic fundus photography (FP) and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) as alternative non-invasive imaging modalities to fluorescein angiography (FA) in the detection of cuticular drusen (CD).
Among 2953 adults from the Danish Rural Eye Study (DRES) with gradable FP, three study groups were selected: (1) All those with suspected CD without age-related macular degeneration (AMD) on FP, (2) all those with suspected CD with AMD on FP and (3) a randomly selected group with early AMD. Groups 1, 2 and 3 underwent FA and FAF and group 4 underwent FAF only as part of DRES CD substudy. Main outcome measures included percentage of correct positive and correct negative diagnoses, Cohen's ? and prevalence-adjusted and bias-adjusted ? (PABAK) coefficients of test and grader reliability.
CD was correctly identified on FP 88.9% of the time and correctly identified as not being present 83.3% of the time. CD was correctly identified on FAF 62.0% of the time and correctly identified as not being present 100.0% of the time. Compared with FA, FP has a PABAK of 0.75 (0.60 to 1.5) and FAF a PABAK of 0.44 (0.23 to 0.95).
FP is a promising, non-invasive substitute for FA in the diagnosis of CD. FAF was less reliable than FP to detect CD.
PubMed ID
26216869 View in PubMed
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Danish Rural Eye Study: Epidemiology of Adult Visual Impairment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275555
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2016;23(1):53-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Tracy Beth Høeg
Christina Ellervik
Helena Buch
Morten La Cour
Kristian Klemp
Jan Kvetny
Ditte Erngaard
Birgitte Moldow
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2016;23(1):53-62
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Vision Disorders - epidemiology
Visual acuity
Visually Impaired Persons - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the frequency and causes of visual impairment (VI) in a select population of Danish adults.
A total of 3843 adults aged 20-94 years from the Danish General Suburban Population Study (GESUS) were included in the population-based, cross-sectional ophthalmological study, Danish Rural Eye Study (DRES). All DRES participants received a comprehensive general health examination preceding their eye examination, including measurement of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) for each eye, bilateral 45° retinal fundus photographs and further ophthalmological examination where indicated.
Overall, 3826 of 3843 participants (99.6%) had bilateral visual acuity measurements. The overall frequency of VI (BCVA 50 years and 3.7% (95% CI 2.1-6.5%; n = 11) in participants >80 years. The primary causes of VI in the better-seeing eye were age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in 46.7% (7/15) and cataract in 26.7% (4/15). A total of 43.3% (n = 115) of participants >80 years were pseudophakic in one or both eyes. The frequency of diabetes (HbA1c = 48 mmol/mol or self-reported diagnosis) was 5.9% (n = 227), including 1.3% (n = 51) newly diagnosed in the GESUS. Of participants determined to have VI due to exudative AMD, 50% had received anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment.
We report a relatively low frequency of VI among Danish adults over 59 years of age compared with that observed 10-15 years ago, which is both consistent with other recent Scandinavian studies and reflective of our relatively healthy and mobile population sample.
PubMed ID
26825126 View in PubMed
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Danish Rural Eye Study: the association of preschool vision screening with the prevalence of amblyopia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267581
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2015 Jun;93(4):322-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Tracy B Høeg
Birgitte Moldow
Christina Ellervik
Kristian Klemp
Ditte Erngaard
Morten la Cour
Helena Buch
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2015 Jun;93(4):322-9
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Amblyopia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Vision Screening
Visual Acuity - physiology
Visually Impaired Persons - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine the prevalence of amblyopia in Denmark before and after the initiation of the Danish national preschool vision screening programme.
In a population-based cross-sectional study, 3826 participants of the Danish General Suburban Population Study (GESUS) aged 20 years and older from a Danish rural municipality received a complete general health examination and an ophthalmological interview and examination. This study included a comprehensive ophthalmologic interview, measurement of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in each eye, Hirschberg's test for strabismus and two 45-degree retinal fundus photographs of each eye. A complete ophthalmologic examination was performed when indicated.
The prevalence of monocular visual impairment (MVI) was 4.26% (95% CI, 3.66-4.95, n = 163). Amblyopia was the most common cause, accounting for 33%. The prevalence of amblyopia was 1.44% (95% CI, 1.01-1.81, n = 55), being higher among non-preschool vision screened persons compared to those who were offered (estimated 95% attendance) preschool vision screening (1.78%, n = 41, 95% CI 1.24-2.33 versus 0.44%, n = 2, 95% CI, 0.12-1.60, p = 0.024). The leading cause of amblyopia was anisometropia (45.5%, 25/55).
Amblyopia was the most common cause of MVI. Following the initiation of the Danish national preschool vision screening programme, which has an approximate attendance rate of 95%, the prevalence of amblyopia decreased by fourfold.
PubMed ID
25545299 View in PubMed
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Diabetic vitrectomy in a large type 1 diabetes patient population: long-term incidence and risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260706
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2014 Aug;92(5):439-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Christoffer Ostri
Morten la Cour
Henrik Lund-Andersen
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2014 Aug;92(5):439-43
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - epidemiology - surgery
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology
Diabetic Retinopathy - blood - epidemiology - surgery
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Incidence
Laser Coagulation
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Vitrectomy - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Diabetic vitrectomy represents an end-point of diabetic retinopathy progression. This study was designed to estimate long-term incidence of diabetic vitrectomy and associated risk factors.
Retrospective review of prospectively collected data from a large diabetes centre between 1996 and 2010. Surgical history was obtained from The Danish National Patient Register.
The population consisted of 3980 patients with type 1 diabetes. Median follow-up was 10.0 years. In total, 106 patients underwent diabetic vitrectomy in the observation period. Surgery indications were nonclearing vitreous haemorrhage (43%) or tractional retinal detachment (57%). The cumulative incidence rates of diabetic vitrectomy were 1.6% after 5 years and 2.9% after 10 years. When excluding patients with no or mild diabetic retinopathy, the corresponding rates were higher; 3.7% and 6.4%, respectively (p 75 mmol/mol in the observation period (p 0.05 for all variables).
Diabetic vitrectomy is rarely required in a type 1 diabetes population with varying degrees of retinopathy, but the risk increases markedly with poor metabolic control.
PubMed ID
23910735 View in PubMed
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Eales' disease in Inuit: report of four cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5358
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2003 Jun;81(3):304-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Birgitte Moldow
Morten la Cour
Author Affiliation
moldow@attglobal.net
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2003 Jun;81(3):304-8
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Fluorescein Angiography
Glucocorticoids - therapeutic use
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits
Laser Coagulation
Male
Retinal Vasculitis - diagnosis - ethnology - therapy
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis - ethnology
Visual acuity
Vitrectomy
Abstract
PURPOSE: To report four cases of Eales' disease in Inuit from Greenland diagnosed within a 6.5-year period. There are no previous reports on Eales' disease among Greenlanders. METHODS: Four younger Inuit, three males and one female, were diagnosed with Eales' disease based on fundus changes and exclusion of possible differential diagnoses. Several studies point to a possible relation between Eales' disease and tuberculosis (TB); examination of possible exposure to TB was part of the clinical investigation. RESULTS: Retinal changes made panretinal laser photocoagulation necessary in all cases. Four eyes in three patients were vitrectomized. Three patients received oral corticosteroid treatment. The final visual outcome was relatively good, with a visual acuity below 6/60 (3/36) in only one vitrectomized eye. All patients had been exposed to TB. CONCLUSION: Eales' disease seems to be rather common in the small population of Inuit (56,000) in Greenland. Attention is required to ensure diagnosis and appropriate treatment, including laser photocoagulation, leading to a reasonably good prognosis.
PubMed ID
12780413 View in PubMed
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Effect of Randomized Lipid Lowering With Simvastatin and Ezetimibe on Cataract Development (from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270964
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2015 Dec 15;116(12):1840-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2015
Author
Casper N Bang
Anders M Greve
Morten La Cour
Kurt Boman
Christa Gohlke-Bärwolf
Simon Ray
Terje Pedersen
Anne Rossebø
Peter M Okin
Richard B Devereux
Kristian Wachtell
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2015 Dec 15;116(12):1840-4
Date
Dec-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticholesteremic Agents - therapeutic use
Aortic Valve Stenosis - blood - complications - drug therapy
Cataract - epidemiology - etiology
Cholesterol, LDL - blood - drug effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Double-Blind Method
Drug Therapy, Combination
Ezetimibe - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Simvastatin - therapeutic use
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Recent American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on statin initiation on the basis of total atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk argue that the preventive effect of statins on cardiovascular events outweigh the side effects, although this is controversial. Studies indicate a possible effect of statin therapy on reducing risk of lens opacities. However, the results are conflicting. The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study (NCT00092677) enrolled 1,873 patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and no history of diabetes, coronary heart disease, or other serious co-morbidities were randomized (1:1) to double-blind 40 mg simvastatin plus 10 mg ezetimibe versus placebo. The primary end point in this substudy was incident cataract. Univariate and multivariate Cox models were used to analyze: (1) if the active treatment reduced the risk of the primary end point and (2) if time-varying low-density lipoproteins (LDL) cholesterol lowering (annually assessed) was associated with less incident cataract per se. During an average follow-up of 4.3 years, 65 patients (3.5%) developed cataract. Mean age at baseline was 68 years and 39% were women. In Cox multivariate analysis adjusted for age, gender, prednisolone treatment, smoking, baseline LDL cholesterol and high sensitivity C-reactive protein; simvastatin plus ezetimibe versus placebo was associated with 44% lower risk of cataract development (hazard ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.33 to 0.96, p = 0.034). In a parallel analysis substituting time-varying LDL-cholesterol with randomized treatment, lower intreatment LDL-cholesterol was in itself associated with lower risk of incident cataract (hazard ratio 0.78 per 1 mmol/ml lower total cholesterol, 95% confidence interval 0.64 to 0.93, p = 0.008). In conclusion, randomized treatment with simvastatin plus ezetimibe was associated with a 44% lower risk of incident cataract development. This effect should perhaps be considered in the risk-benefit ratio of statin treatment.
PubMed ID
26602073 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of 411 140 cataract operations performed in public hospitals and private hospitals/clinics in Denmark between 2004 and 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264011
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2015 Feb;93(1):16-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Søren Solborg Bjerrum
Kim Lyngby Mikkelsen
Morten la Cour
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2015 Feb;93(1):16-23
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cataract - epidemiology
Cataract Extraction - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitals, Private - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Public - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To study the epidemiology and mortality in patients who had cataract surgery in public hospitals and private hospitals/clinics in Denmark between 2004 and 2012 and to assess the validity of the Danish cataract registries.
Register- and chart-based study.
A total of 411 140 cataract operations were performed in 243 856 patients. Patients who had cataract surgery in public hospitals had an overall statistically significantly 62% higher mortality compared to patients who had cataract surgery in private hospitals/clinics. The decrease in mean age at first eye cataract surgery in private hospitals/clinics was statistically significantly greater compared to the decrease in mean age at first eye cataract surgery in public hospitals (p
PubMed ID
25495244 View in PubMed
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Macular holes: classification, epidemiology, natural history and treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187357
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2002 Dec;80(6):579-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Morten la Cour
Jakob Friis
Author Affiliation
Eye Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. m.la.cour@dadlnet.dk
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2002 Dec;80(6):579-87
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Prevalence
Retinal Perforations - classification - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Macular hole is a retinal disease primarily affecting elderly women. Its overall prevalence in the Danish population is estimated to be 0.14%. The majority of cases are unilateral. The fully developed macular hole evolves through a series of stages starting with an impending hole. About half of impending macular holes regress spontaneously. The remaining half progress to full thickness macular holes. In a patient with a macular hole in one eye, the risk of development of a macular hole in the fellow eye is less than 2% if posterior vitreous detachment is present. If the posterior vitreous is attached, the risk is approximately 15%. If an impending hole is found in the other eye, the risk rises to 50%.
Macular hole surgery is able to close full thickness macular holes in approximately 90% of cases. Visual acuity of 20/50 or better can be obtained in approximately half of patients with recent onset of symptoms. Complications include retinal detachment, endophthalmitis, late reopening of an initially successfully closed hole and retinal pigment epithelial abnormalities. Retinal detachment should be expected in less than 5% of cases.
PubMed ID
12485276 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.