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Alcohol-attributable and alcohol-preventable mortality in Denmark: an analysis of which intake levels contribute most to alcohol's harmful and beneficial effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106686
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Jan;29(1):15-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Marie Eliasen
Ulrik Becker
Morten Grønbæk
Knud Juel
Janne Schurmann Tolstrup
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, 2nd Floor, 1353, Copenhagen K, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Jan;29(1):15-26
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - mortality - prevention & control
Alcohol-Related Disorders - complications - mortality - prevention & control
Alcoholic Intoxication - complications - mortality
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to quantify alcohol-attributable and -preventable mortality, totally and stratified on alcohol consumption in Denmark 2010, and to estimate alcohol-related mortality assuming different scenarios of changes in alcohol distribution in the population. We estimated alcohol-attributable and -preventable fractions based on relative risks of conditions causally associated with alcohol from meta-analyses and information on alcohol consumption in Denmark obtained from 14,458 participants in the Danish National Health Survey 2010 and corrected for adult per capita consumption. Cause-specific mortality data were obtained from the Danish Register of Causes of Death. In total, 1,373 deaths among women (5.0% of all deaths) and 2,522 deaths among men (9.5% of all deaths) were attributable to alcohol, while an estimated number of 765 (2.8%) and 583 (2.2%) deaths were prevented by alcohol. Of the alcohol-attributable deaths, 73 and 81% occurred within the high alcohol consumption group (>14/21 drinks/week for women/men). A reduction of 50% in the alcohol consumption was associated with a decrease of 1,406 partly alcohol-attributable deaths (46%) and 37 alcohol-preventable deaths (3%). Total compliance with sensible drinking guidelines with a low risk limit (
PubMed ID
24129661 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation in men and women: the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9123
Source
Circulation. 2005 Sep 20;112(12):1736-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-2005
Author
Kenneth J Mukamal
Janne S Tolstrup
Jens Friberg
Gorm Jensen
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Division of General Medicine and Primary Care, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA. kmukamal@bidmc.harvard.edu
Source
Circulation. 2005 Sep 20;112(12):1736-42
Date
Sep-20-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The relationship of the full range of alcohol consumption with risk of incident atrial fibrillation has been inconsistent in previous, mainly case-control studies. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a prospective cohort study, we studied the association between self-reported alcohol use and incident atrial fibrillation among 16,415 women and men enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. We ascertained use of beer, wine, and spirits individually at up to 3 study visits with a structured questionnaire. We identified cases of atrial fibrillation by routine study ECGs and a validated nationwide registry of all hospitalizations. A total of 1071 cases occurred during follow-up. Among both women and men, alcohol consumption throughout the moderate range was not associated with risk of atrial fibrillation. However, consumption of 35 or more drinks per week among men was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.45 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.04); few women consumed this amount of alcohol. Approximately 5% of cases of atrial fibrillation among men were attributable to heavy alcohol use. Further adjustment for blood pressure and incident coronary heart disease and congestive heart failure did not attenuate the association (hazard ratio 1.63; 95% CI 1.15 to 2.31). CONCLUSIONS: Heavy alcohol consumption is associated with a higher risk of atrial fibrillation, at least among men. This relationship does not appear to be related to the adverse effects of heavy drinking on coronary heart disease or blood pressure.
PubMed ID
16157768 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking pattern and risk of alcoholic liver cirrhosis: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269609
Source
J Hepatol. 2015 May;62(5):1061-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Gro Askgaard
Morten Grønbæk
Mette S Kjær
Anne Tjønneland
Janne S Tolstrup
Source
J Hepatol. 2015 May;62(5):1061-7
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - classification
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Abstract
Alcohol is the main contributing factor of alcoholic cirrhosis, but less is known about the significance of drinking pattern.
We investigated the risk of alcoholic cirrhosis among 55,917 participants (aged 50-64 years) in the Danish Cancer, Diet, and Health study (1993-2011). Baseline information on alcohol intake, drinking pattern, and confounders was obtained from a questionnaire. Follow-up information came from national registers. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for alcoholic cirrhosis in relation to drinking frequency, lifetime alcohol amount, and beverage type.
We observed 257 and 85 incident cases of alcoholic cirrhosis among men and women, respectively, none among lifetime abstainers. In men, HR for alcoholic cirrhosis among daily drinkers was 3.65 (95% CI: 2.39; 5.55) compared to drinking 2-4 days/week. Alcohol amount in recent age periods (40-49 and 50-59 years) was associated with an increased risk, whereas the amount in 20-29 and 30-39 years was not. In men drinking 14-28 drinks/week, HR was 7.47 (95% CI: 1.68; 33.12), 3.12 (95% CI: 1.53; 6.39), and 1.69 (95% CI: 0.79; 3.65) in drinkers of little (
Notes
Comment In: J Hepatol. 2015 May;62(5):1000-125646887
PubMed ID
25634330 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking patterns and risk of diabetes: a cohort study of 70,551 men and women from the general Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292493
Source
Diabetologia. 2017 Oct; 60(10):1941-1950
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Charlotte Holst
Ulrik Becker
Marit E Jørgensen
Morten Grønbæk
Janne S Tolstrup
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, 2. Floor, 1353, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Diabetologia. 2017 Oct; 60(10):1941-1950
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Alcohol consumption is inversely associated with diabetes, but little is known about the role of drinking patterns. We examined the association between alcohol drinking patterns and diabetes risk in men and women from the general Danish population.
This cohort study was based on data from the Danish Health Examination Survey 2007-2008. Of the 76,484 survey participants, 28,704 men and 41,847 women were eligible for this study. Participants were followed for a median of 4.9 years. Self-reported questionnaires were used to obtain information on alcohol drinking patterns, i.e. frequency of alcohol drinking, frequency of binge drinking, and consumption of wine, beer and spirits, from which we calculated beverage-specific and overall average weekly alcohol intake. Information on incident cases of diabetes was obtained from the Danish National Diabetes Register. Cox proportional hazards model was applied to estimate HRs and 95% CIs.
During follow-up, 859 men and 887 women developed diabetes. The lowest risk of diabetes was observed at 14 drinks/week in men (HR 0.57 [95% CI 0.47, 0.70]) and at 9 drinks/week in women (HR 0.42 [95% CI 0.35, 0.51]), relative to no alcohol intake. Compared with current alcohol consumers consuming
Notes
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PubMed ID
28748324 View in PubMed
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Alcoholic beverage preference and risk of becoming a heavy drinker.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10029
Source
Epidemiology. 2002 Mar;13(2):127-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Majken K Jensen
Anne T Andersen
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Ulrik Becker
Thorkil Thorsen
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Epidemiology. 2002 Mar;13(2):127-32
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Beer
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Wine
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Studies have suggested that wine drinkers are at lower risk of death than beer or spirits drinkers. The aim of this study is to examine whether the risk of becoming a heavy or excessive drinker differs among individuals who prefer different types of alcoholic beverages. METHODS: In a longitudinal study of 10,330 moderate drinkers from Copenhagen, Denmark, we used logistic regression analyses to address the risk of becoming a heavy or excessive drinker (above 14 and 21 drinks per week, respectively, for women and above 21 and 35 drinks per week for men) according to preference of wine, beer, or spirits. RESULTS: Compared with those who preferred wine, those who preferred beer tended to have increased risk of becoming heavy and excessive drinkers. Women who preferred beer had odds ratios of 1.14 (95% CI = 0.87-1.50) for becoming heavy drinkers and 1.50 (95% CI = 0.93-2.43) for becoming excessive drinkers. For men who preferred beer the ORs were 1.16 (95% CI = 0.84-1.58) and 1.81 (95% CI = 0.85-3.82). CONCLUSION: The finding that moderate wine drinkers appear to be at lower risk of becoming heavy and excessive drinkers may add to the explanation of the reported beverage-specific differences in morbidity and mortality.
Notes
Comment In: Epidemiology. 2002 Mar;13(2):120-211880749
PubMed ID
11880751 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake, drinking patterns and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in Denmark: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9707
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Apr;14(3):277-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Anne Tjønneland
Birthe L Thomsen
Connie Stripp
Jane Christensen
Kim Overvad
Lene Mellemkaer
Morten Grønbaek
Jørgen H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. annet@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Apr;14(3):277-84
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The available epidemiological evidence indicates that drinking alcohol per se is associated with breast cancer. However, it has not been investigated how the breast cancer risk for a given total alcohol consumption depends on the drinking frequency. METHODS: Within the prospective study on 'Diet, Cancer and Health', we examined the relationship between breast cancer, intake of total alcohol and frequency of drinking among 23,778 postmenopausal women, among whom 425 cases of breast cancer accrued during a median follow-up of 4.8 years. RESULTS: The dose-response relationship between total alcohol intake and breast cancer showed an increase in the rate ratio of 1.10 per 10 g/day (95% CI: 1.04-1.16) with no evidence for differences by type of alcohol beverage. No interaction was found between drinking frequency and total alcohol intake in the risk of breast cancer (p = 0.40). CONCLUSIONS: The present study supports previous ones in showing a monotonic increase in the risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women with increasing average daily intake of alcohol, and this relationship with alcohol intake did not depend on drinking frequency.
PubMed ID
12814207 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake, myocardial infarction, biochemical risk factors, and alcohol dehydrogenase genotypes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98530
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2009 Oct;2(5):507-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Janne S Tolstrup
Morten Grønbaek
Børge G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol Research, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. jst@niph.dk
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2009 Oct;2(5):507-14
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Dehydrogenase - genetics
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Biological Markers - blood - metabolism
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fibrinogen - metabolism
Follow-Up Studies
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - enzymology - epidemiology - genetics - metabolism
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The risk of myocardial infarction is lower among light-to-moderate alcohol drinkers compared with abstainers. We tested associations between alcohol intake and risk of myocardial infarction and risk factors and whether these associations are modified by variations in alcohol dehydrogenases. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used information on 9584 men and women from the Danish general population in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. During follow-up, from 1991 to 2007, 663 incident cases of myocardial infarction occurred. We observed that increasing alcohol intake was associated with decreasing risk of myocardial infarction, decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and fibrinogen, increasing diastolic and systolic blood pressure and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and with U-shaped nonfasting triglycerides. In contrast, ADH1B and ADH1C genotypes were not associated with risk of myocardial infarction or with any of the cardiovascular biochemical risk factors, and there was no indication that associations between alcohol intake and myocardial infarction and between alcohol intake and risk factors were modified by genotypes. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing alcohol intake is associated with decreasing risk of myocardial infarction, decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and fibrinogen, increasing diastolic and systolic blood pressure and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and U-shaped nonfasting triglycerides. These associations were not modified by ADH1B and ADH1C are genotypes.
PubMed ID
20031627 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use as predictor for infertility in a representative population of Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9692
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Aug;82(8):744-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Janne Schurmann Tolstrup
Susanne Krüger Kjaer
Claus Holst
Heidi Sharif
Christian Munk
Merete Osler
Lone Schmidt
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol Research, National Institute of Public Health, and Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen Hospital Corporation, Denmark. jst@niph.dk
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Aug;82(8):744-9
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - etiology
Maternal Age
Population Surveillance
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Our aim was to examine the association between use of alcohol and subsequent incidence of primary infertility. METHODS: The study subjects were chosen from a population-based cohort of Danish women aged 20-29 years. Eligible women were nulliparous and not pregnant (n = 7760). Information on alcohol intake and potential confounders (age, education, marital status, diseases in the reproductive organs, and cigarette smoking) was assessed at enrollment. The incidence of fertility problems during follow-up was obtained by record linkage with the Danish Hospital Discharge Register and the Danish Infertility Cohort Register. Main outcome measures were hazard ratios of infertility according to alcohol intake at baseline estimated in a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 4.9 years, 368 women had experienced infertility. Alcohol intake at baseline was unassociated with infertility among younger women, but was a significant predictor for infertility among women above age 30. In this age group, the adjusted hazard ratio for consuming seven or more drinks per week was 2.26 (95% confidence interval: 1.19-4.32) compared with women consuming less than one drink per week. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that alcohol intake is a predictor for infertility problems among women in the later reproductive age group.
PubMed ID
12848646 View in PubMed
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Amount and type of alcohol and risk of dementia: the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9873
Source
Neurology. 2002 Nov 12;59(9):1313-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-12-2002
Author
Thomas Truelsen
Dorte Thudium
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Institute of Preventive Medicine, Kommunehospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. truelsen@post3.tele.dk
Source
Neurology. 2002 Nov 12;59(9):1313-9
Date
Nov-12-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Beer
Case-Control Studies
Central Nervous System Depressants - therapeutic use
Dementia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Denmark - epidemiology
Ethanol - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Wine
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess whether amount or type of alcohol is associated with risk of dementia. Methods and subjects: Case-control nested in a cohort study among participants in the third Copenhagen City Heart Study (1991 to 1994), aged 65 years or more, who where screened using the Mini-Mental State Examination and subsequently examined for dementia. There were 83 subjects diagnosed with dementia and the remaining 1,626 nondemented subjects were included as controls. The two groups were compared with regard to alcohol intake and type of alcohol assessed 15 years before. RESULTS: Average weekly total alcohol intake had no significant effect on risk of dementia. Monthly and weekly intake of wine was significantly associated with a lower risk of dementia. For beer and spirits, only a monthly intake of beer was significantly associated with an increased risk of dementia. The effect of alcohol on risk of dementia did not differ between men and women. CONCLUSIONS: Monthly and weekly intake of wine is associated with a lower risk of dementia. The results do not indicate that people should start drinking or increase wine consumption to avoid dementia, but instead suggest that certain substances in wine may reduce the occurrence of dementia.
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2002 Nov 12;59(9):1300-112427873
PubMed ID
12427876 View in PubMed
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Amount and type of alcohol consumption and missing teeth among community-dwelling older adults: findings from the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127155
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karen Heegaard
Kirsten Avlund
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Allan Bardow
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. karen.heegaard@mail.tele.dk
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - classification - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Population Surveillance
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study if an association between total weekly intake of alcohol, type-specific weekly alcohol intake, alcoholic beverage preference, and the number of teeth among older people exists.
A cross-sectional study including a total of 783 community-dwelling men and women aged 65-95 years who were interviewed about alcohol drinking habits and underwent a clinical oral and dental examination. Multiple regression analyses were applied for studying the association between total weekly alcohol consumption, beverage-specific alcohol consumption, beverage preference (defined as the highest intake of one beverage type compared with two other types), and the number of remaining teeth (= 20 versus >20 remaining teeth).
The odds ratio (OR) of having a low number of teeth decreased with the total intake of alcohol in women, with ORs for a low number of teeth of 0.40 [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 0.22-0.76] in women drinking 1-14 drinks per week and 0.34 (95 percent CI 0.16-0.74) in women with an intake of more than 14 drinks per week compared with abstainers. Similar relations could also be obtained for type-specific alcohol intake of wine and for wine and spirits preference among women. Men who preferred beer showed a decreased risk for a low number of teeth compared with men with other alcohol preferences.
In this study, alcohol consumption, wine drinking, and wine and spirits preference among women were associated with a higher number of teeth compared with abstainers. Among men, those who preferred beer also had a higher number of teeth.
PubMed ID
22320290 View in PubMed
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79 records – page 1 of 8.