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Age at Menarche and Risk of Multiple Sclerosis: A Prospective Cohort Study Based on the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282031
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Apr 15;185(8):712-719
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2017
Author
Nete Munk Nielsen
Maria Harpsøe
Jacob Simonsen
Egon Stenager
Melinda Magyari
Nils Koch-Henriksen
Jennifer L Baker
Henrik Hjalgrim
Morten Frisch
Peter Bager
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Apr 15;185(8):712-719
Date
Apr-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Menarche
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Few studies have addressed the possible association between age at menarche and multiple sclerosis (MS), and results are conflicting. We studied this issue in a large prospective cohort study. The study cohort comprised 77,330 women included in the Danish National Birth Cohort (1996-2002). Information on menarcheal age was ascertained at the first interview, which took place in the 16th week of pregnancy. Women were followed for MS from the first interview to December 31, 2011. Associations between age at menarche and risk of MS were evaluated with hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Overall, 226 women developed MS during an average follow-up period of 11.7 years. Age at menarche among women with MS was generally lower than that among women without MS (Wilcoxon rank-sum test; P = 0.002). We observed an inverse association between age at menarche and MS risk. For each 1-year increase in age at menarche, risk of MS was reduced by 13% (hazard ratio = 0.87, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.96). Early age at menarche appears to be associated with an increased risk of MS. The mechanisms behind this association remain to be established.
PubMed ID
28369233 View in PubMed
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All-cause mortality among men whose cohabiting partner has been diagnosed with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118419
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Jan;24(1):96-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Naoki Nakaya
Kumi Saito-Nakaya
Pernille E Bidstrup
Susanne O Dalton
Kirsten Frederiksen
Hanne Würtzen
Marianne Steding-Jessen
Yosuke Uchitomi
Morten Frisch
Christoffer Johansen
Author Affiliation
Survivorship, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden, Copenhagen, Denmark. nakaya-thk@umin.ac.jp
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Jan;24(1):96-9
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - psychology
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Spouses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Stress, Psychological - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Previous studies suggest that spouses of cancer patients are at increased risk for several chronic diseases. We investigated mortality in relation to cancer morbidity in the stable female partner.
We established a national retrospective cohort study of 1,422,131 men who had lived continuously with the same partner for at least 5 years and used Cox regression analysis to assess the association between experiencing cancer in a cohabiting partner and all-cause mortality.
The risk for death was only slightly elevated among men whose partner had cancer than for men whose partner remained free of cancer (hazard ratio = 1.03; 95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.05).
Although a cancer diagnosis in a spouse might be associated with considerable distress, our study indicates that the risk for death differs only slightly between men living with a partner with cancer and those living with a partner without cancer.
PubMed ID
23211347 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic use and inflammatory bowel diseases in childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139909
Source
Gut. 2011 Jan;60(1):49-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Anders Hviid
Henrik Svanström
Morten Frisch
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. aii@ssi.dk
Source
Gut. 2011 Jan;60(1):49-54
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Colitis, Ulcerative - chemically induced - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Crohn Disease - chemically induced - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Administration Schedule
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The composition of the intestinal microflora has been proposed as an important factor in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Antibiotics have the potential to alter the composition of the intestinal microflora. A study was undertaken to evaluate the potential association between use of antibiotics and IBD in childhood.
A nationwide cohort study was conducted of all Danish singleton children born from 1995 to 2003 (N=577,627) with individual-level information on filled antibiotic prescriptions, IBD and potential confounding variables. Using Poisson regression, rate ratios (RRs) of IBD were calculated according to antibiotic use. Antibiotic use was classified according to time since use, type, number of courses used and age at use.
IBD was diagnosed in 117 children during 3,173,117 person-years of follow-up. The RR of IBD was 1.84 (95% CI 1.08 to 3.15) for antibiotic users compared with non-users. This association appeared to be an effect on Crohn's disease (CD) alone (RR 3.41) and was strongest in the first 3 months following use (RR 4.43) and among children with =7 courses of antibiotics (RR 7.32).
Antibiotic use is common in childhood and its potential as an environmental risk factor for IBD warrants scrutiny. This is the first prospective study to show a strong association between antibiotic use and CD in childhood. However, as with any observational study, causality cannot be inferred from our results and confounding by indication--in particular, prescribing of antibiotics to children with intestinal symptoms of as yet undiagnosed CD--should also be considered as a possible explanation.
Notes
Comment In: Gastroenterology. 2011 Aug;141(2):768-7021704036
PubMed ID
20966024 View in PubMed
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Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies do not reflect self-reported disability and physical health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of less than 5 years of duration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112615
Source
Rheumatol Int. 2013 Nov;33(11):2763-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Chalotte Heinsvig Poulsen
Søren Jacobsen
Morten Frisch
Kirsten Frederiksen
Christoffer Johansen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Survivorship, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, 49 Strandboulevarden, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark, heinsvig@cancer.dk.
Source
Rheumatol Int. 2013 Nov;33(11):2763-72
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - blood - immunology
Autoantibodies - blood - immunology
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Disability Evaluation
Disease Progression
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Peptides, Cyclic - immunology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
It is well accepted that patients with antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer from more severe forms of RA in terms of clinical presentation and radiographic destruction at long term compared to anti-CCP-negative patients. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate whether the measures of self-reported health among patients with RA of 0.05). Both groups of RA patients reported significantly more physical disabilities in everyday life and significantly poorer physical health than the controls (both p
PubMed ID
23812092 View in PubMed
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Associations between Physical and Mental Health Problems and Sexual Dysfunctions in Sexually Active Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99799
Source
J Sex Med. 2010 Dec 22;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-22-2010
Author
Birgitte Schütt Christensen
Morten Grønbaek
Merete Osler
Bo Vestergaard Pedersen
Christian Graugaard
Morten Frisch
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark Copenhagen University Library, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Sex Med. 2010 Dec 22;
Date
Dec-22-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Introduction. Studies have shown a high prevalence of sexual dysfunctions among individuals with a variety of health problems. Aim. To obtain a population-based assessment of these matters, we studied associations between indicators of physical and mental health problems and sexual dysfunctions in Denmark. Methods. We used questionnaire data from 4,415 sexually active men (mean age 48 years) and women (mean age 45 years) who participated in a nationally representative survey in 2005. Cross-sectional associations of overall health and physical and mental health problems with sexual dysfunctions in the last year were estimated by logistic regression-derived, confounder-adjusted odds ratios (OR(adj) ). Main Outcome Measures. We calculated OR(adj) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for erectile dysfunction, anorgasmia, premature ejaculation, and dyspareunia in men, for lubrication insufficiency, anorgasmia, dyspareunia, and vaginismus in women, and for sexual dysfunction and sexual difficulties overall in both sexes. Results. Sexual dysfunction was significantly more common among participants with poor self-rated health (OR(adj) 1.86, 95% CI 1.05-3.33 in men, OR(adj) 1.91, 1.08-3.37 in women). Physical health problems were significantly associated with male sexual dysfunctions (OR(adj) 1.75, 1.18-2.61), whereas mental health problems were significantly associated with female sexual dysfunctions (OR(adj) 2.59, 1.60-4.22). Conclusion. Among sexually active Danes, poor self-reported overall health is associated with increased rates of sexual dysfunction in both sexes, with physical health problems mainly affecting men's sex lives, and mental health problems being strongly associated with female sexual dysfunction. Christensen BS, Grønbaek M, Osler M, Pedersen BV, Graugaard C, and Frisch M. Associations between physical and mental health problems and sexual dysfunctions in sexually active Danes. J Sex Med **;**:**-**.
PubMed ID
21176110 View in PubMed
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Associations of unhealthy lifestyle factors with sexual inactivity and sexual dysfunctions in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134534
Source
J Sex Med. 2011 Jul;8(7):1903-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Birgitte S Christensen
Morten Grønbaek
Bo V Pedersen
Christian Graugaard
Morten Frisch
Author Affiliation
Statens Serum Institut, Department of Epidemiology Research, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Sex Med. 2011 Jul;8(7):1903-16
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Weight
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Odds Ratio
Sexual Behavior
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological - epidemiology - etiology
Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Substance-Related Disorders - complications
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies have linked obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, and tobacco smoking to erectile dysfunction, but the evidence linking unhealthy lifestyle factors to other sexual dysfunctions or to sexual inactivity is conflicting.
To examine associations between unhealthy lifestyle factors and sexual inactivity with a partner and four specific sexual dysfunctions in each sex.
We used nationally representative survey data from 5,552 Danish men and women aged 16-97 years in 2005. Cross-sectional associations of lifestyle factors with sexual inactivity and sexual dysfunctions were estimated by logistic regression-derived, confounder-adjusted odds ratios (ORs).
We calculated ORs for sexual inactivity with a partner and for sexual dysfunction and sexual difficulties overall in both sexes, for erectile dysfunction, anorgasmia, premature ejaculation, and dyspareunia in men, and for lubrication insufficiency, anorgasmia, dyspareunia, and vaginismus in women.
Obesity (body mass index [BMI]=30 kg/m(2) ) or a substantially increased waist circumference (men =102 cm; women =88 cm), physical inactivity, and, among women, tobacco smoking were each significantly associated with sexual inactivity in the last year. Among sexually active men, both underweight (BMI 21 alcoholic beverages/week), tobacco smoking, and use of hard drugs were each significantly positively associated with one or more sexual dysfunctions (ORs between 1.71 and 22.0). Among sexually active women, the only significant positive association between an unhealthy lifestyle factor and sexual dysfunction was between hashish use and anorgasmia (OR 2.85).
In both sexes, several unhealthy lifestyle factors were associated with sexual inactivity with a partner in the last year. Additionally, among sexually active participants, men with unhealthy lifestyles were significantly more likely to experience sexual dysfunctions. Considering the importance of a good sex life, our findings may be useful in attempts to promote healthier lifestyles.
PubMed ID
21569211 View in PubMed
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Autoimmune diseases in a Danish cohort of 4,866 carriers of constitutional structural chromosomal rearrangements.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162756
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2007 Jul;56(7):2402-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Iben Bache
Nete M Nielsen
Klaus Rostgaard
Niels Tommerup
Morten Frisch
Author Affiliation
Wilhelm Johannsen Centre for Functional Genome Research, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. iben@imbg.ku.dk
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2007 Jul;56(7):2402-9
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autoimmune Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosomes, Human - genetics
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gene Rearrangement
Humans
Male
Abstract
Constitutional structural chromosomal rearrangements (CSCRs) have facilitated the identification of genes associated with early-onset monogenic disorders and, more recently, genes associated with common and late-onset disorders. In an attempt to find genetic clues to their etiologies, we studied the risk of autoimmune diseases in a Danish cohort of CSCR carriers.
We followed up 4,866 CSCR carriers over 71,230 person-years (1980 through 2004) for autoimmune diseases recorded in the Danish Hospital Discharge Register. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) served as measures of the relative risk. To identify possible candidate loci for autoimmune diseases, the reported chromosomal breakpoints and deletions in CSCR carriers who developed autoimmune diseases were compared with previously suggested loci for these diseases.
The overall risk of any autoimmune disease among CSCR carriers was inconspicuous (SIR 1.2 [95% CI 0.95-1.5]; n = 74 cases observed versus 61.3 expected), but carriers of rearrangements involving chromosomes 2, 19, and 21 were at significantly increased risk. For the specific autoimmune diseases studied, cohort members were at significantly increased risk of Dupuytren's contracture, pernicious anemia, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Sixteen carriers who developed an autoimmune disease had a chromosomal breakpoint or deletion coinciding with a previously suggested locus, including deletions 18p11, 18q22, and 22q11 associated with JRA.
CSCR carriers do not have a generalized predisposition to autoimmune diseases. However, we confirmed a number of reported susceptibility loci for JRA, and we suggest new susceptibility loci on chromosomes 5 and 11 for Dupuytren's contracture, and 19p13 as a possible shared susceptibility locus for a range of autoimmune diseases.
PubMed ID
17599768 View in PubMed
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Body mass index and risk of autoimmune diseases: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260519
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Jun;43(3):843-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Maria C Harpsøe
Saima Basit
Mikael Andersson
Nete M Nielsen
Morten Frisch
Jan Wohlfahrt
Ellen A Nohr
Allan Linneberg
Tine Jess
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Jun;43(3):843-55
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Autoimmune Diseases - epidemiology
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Obesity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
A possible aetiological link between obesity and certain autoimmune diseases (ADs) has been suggested. We investigated the associations between body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) and 43 ADs.
75,008 women participating in the Danish National Birth Cohort were followed during a median time of 11 years. Diagnoses on ADs were retrieved from the Danish National Patient Register. Cox proportional hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated adjusting for potential confounders (smoking, alcohol, parity and socio-occupational status).
During follow-up, 2430 women (3.2%) developed a total of 2607 new-onset ADs. Risk of any autoimmune disease was increased in obese women (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.46) compared with normal weight women (18.5-=25 kg/m2). Obese women (BMI=30 kg/m2) were at increased risk of sarcoidosis (HR 3.59; 95% CI, 2.31 to 5.57) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (HR 2.67; 95% CI, 1.71 to 4.17). Risk of dermatitis herpetiformis increased by 14% (95% CI, 1% to 30%) per BMI unit. Conversely, risk of celiac disease and Raynaud's phenomenon decreased by 7% (95% CI, 1% to 13%) and 12% (95% CI, 4% to 19%) per BMI unit, respectively. Further associations between BMI and risk of psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease were suggested.
BMI was found to be associated with several Ads. This was most pronounced between obesity and risk of sarcoidosis and and risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus. These novel findings need confirmation and the possible role of adipose tissue-derived immunological changes in the development of autoimmune reactions needs consideration.
PubMed ID
24609069 View in PubMed
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Body size at birth and same-sex marriage in young adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99102
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2010 Feb;39(1):117-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Morten Frisch
Slobodan Zdravkovic
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, 2300, Copenhagen S, Denmark. mfr@ssi.dk
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2010 Feb;39(1):117-23
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Size
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Homosexuality, Female
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
An unexplained excess of overweight has been reported among lesbians. In contrast, reports suggest that gay men may be, on average, slightly lighter and shorter than heterosexual men. We studied associations between weight, length, and body mass index (BMI) at birth and same-sex marriage in young adulthood among 818,671 Danes. We used linear regression to calculate differences in mean body measures at birth and Poisson regression analysis to calculate confounder-adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRR) of same-sex marriage according to body measures at birth. Overall, 739 persons entered same-sex marriage at age 18-32 years during 5.6 million person-years of follow-up. Birth year-adjusted mean body measures at birth were similar for same-sex married and other women. However, same-sex marriage rates were 65% higher among women of heavy birth weight (IRR = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.18-2.31, for > or =4000 vs. 3000-3499 g, p = .02), and rates were inversely associated with birth length (p (trend) = .04). For same-sex married men, birth year-adjusted mean weight (-72 g, p = .03), length (-0.3 cm, p = .04), and BMI (-0.1 kg/m(2), p = .09) at birth were lower than for other Danish men. Same-sex marriage rates were increased in men of short birth length (IRR = 1.45; 95% CI = 1.01-2.08, for
PubMed ID
18780174 View in PubMed
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Cancer in a population-based cohort of men and women in registered homosexual partnerships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7307
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Jun 1;157(11):966-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2003
Author
Morten Frisch
Else Smith
Andrew Grulich
Christoffer Johansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Center, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. mfr@ssi.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Jun 1;157(11):966-72
Date
Jun-1-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - complications
Adolescent
Adult
Anus Neoplasms - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Homosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sarcoma, Kaposi - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Cancer patterns among broad populations of homosexual men and women have not been studied systematically. The authors followed 1,614 women and 3,391 men in Denmark for cancer from their first registration for marriage-like homosexual partnership between 1989 and 1997. Ratios of observed to expected cancers measured relative risk. Women in homosexual partnerships had cancer risks similar to those of Danish women in general (overall relative risk (RR) = 0.9, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.6, 1.4), but only one woman developed cervical carcinoma in situ versus 5.8 women expected (RR = 0.2, 95% CI: 0.0, 0.97). Overall, men in homosexual partnerships were at elevated cancer risk (RR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.8, 2.5), due mainly to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (RR = 136, 95% CI: 96, 186) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (RR = 15.1, 95% CI: 10.4, 21.4). Anal squamous carcinoma also occurred in excess (RR = 31.2, 95% CI: 8.4, 79.8). After exclusion of Kaposi's sarcoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and anal squamous carcinoma, no unusual cancer risk remained (RR = 1.0, 95% CI: 0.8, 1.3). With anal squamous carcinoma and HIV/AIDS-associated cancers as notable exceptions in men, cancer incidence rates among homosexual persons in marriage-like partnerships are similar to those prevailing in society at large.
PubMed ID
12777359 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.